Kansas MemoryKansas Memory

Kansas Historical SocietyKansas Historical Society

-

Log In

Username:

Password:

After login, go to:

Register
Forgot Username?
Forgot Password?

Browse Users
Contact us

-

Martha Farnsworth

-

Podcast Archive

Governor Mike Hayden Interview
Details
Listen Now
Subscribe - iTunesSubscribe - RSS

More podcasts

-

Popular Item

undated 1977 (Box 49, Folder 4)

-

Random Item

U.S. Navy officers at Portland, England U.S. Navy officers at Portland, England

-

Site Statistics

Total images: 732,046
Bookbag items: 38,117
Registered users: 11,693

-

About

Kansas Memory has been created by the Kansas State Historical Society to share its historical collections via the Internet. Read more.

-

Syndication

Matching items: 4

Category Filters

Objects and Artifacts - Archeological Artifacts - Material/Stone Type - Tahlequah

Search within these results


       

Search Tips

Start Over | RSS Feed RSS Feed

View: Image Only | Title Only | Detailed
Sort by: TitleSort by Title, Ascending | Date | Creator | Newest

Showing 1 - 4 of 4 (results per page: 10 | 25 | 50)


Alternately Beveled Knives from 14MY316

Alternately Beveled Knives from 14MY316
Date: 800-1000 CE
These two alternately beveled knife fragments were recovered from an Early Ceramic village in Montgomery County. The site had at least one house and may represent a Pomona occupation. Radiocarbon dating on a burned post gave a date of 800-1000 CE. Archeologists believe that knives shaped like these would have been used for bison butchering. They can be alternately sharpened on all four sides or on two alternate sides. One knife has an exposed portion of a fossilized segmented worm, Spriggina floudersi. The other knife was made of a chert called Tahlequah, that outcrops in eastern Oklahoma.


Drills from the Tobias Site, 14RC8

Drills from the Tobias Site, 14RC8
Date: 1400-1700 CE
These six drills were used to bore holes in softer materials than the drill material itself, such as hides, shells, or soft stone. Those on the top row were made of Alibates flint, a silicified or agatized dolomite from the Canadian River valley in the Texas panhandle. The drill on the bottom left was made of Tahlequah chert, that outcrops in eastern Oklahoma. The drill on the center bottom row is made of heat-treated Permian chert and the drill on the bottom right was made of an unknown chert type. All six drills were recovered from the excavations at the 1977 Kansas Archeology Training Program field school at the Tobias site in Rice County. The Tobias site is a Great Bend aspect (ancestral Wichita) village that had dense artifact deposits, house remains, and numerous deep trash-filled storage pits. It is listed in the National Register of Historic Places.


Side-Notched Arrow Points from the Tobias Site, 14RC8

Side-Notched Arrow Points from the Tobias Site, 14RC8
Date: 1400-1700 CE
These four side-notched arrow points were made on Tahlequah chert that outcrops in eastern Oklahoma. The notches on the arrow points aided in hafting the point to the arrow shaft. They were recovered from the excavations during the 1977 Kansas Archeology Training Program field school at the Tobias site in Rice County. The Tobias site is a Great Bend Aspect (ancestral Wichita) village that had dense artifact deposits, house remains, and numerous deep trash-filled storage pits. The site is listed in the National Register of Historic Places.


Tahlequah Modified Flakes from the Malone Site, 14RC5

Tahlequah Modified Flakes from the Malone Site, 14RC5
Date: 1432-1651 CE
These modified flakes were collected from the Malone village site in Rice County and donated to the Kansas Historical Society in 1963. Tahlequah chert outcrops in eastern Oklahoma. Either a piece of the raw material or the modified flakes were traded into Kansas. The Malone site is a Great Bend aspect (ancestral Wichita) village that had dense artifact deposits and numerous deep trash-filled storage pits.


Showing 1 - 4

Copyright © 2007-2020 - Kansas Historical Society - Contact Us
This website was developed in part with funding provided by the Information Network of Kansas.