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Winter 1977, Volume 43, Number 4

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Kansas Memory has been created by the Kansas State Historical Society to share its historical collections via the Internet. Read more.

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Date - 1840s - 1847

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Fort Leavenworth map

Fort Leavenworth map
Date: 1847
This is a hand-drawn map of Fort Leavenworth showing building locations, the fort's proximity to the Missouri River, and the Santa Fe Trail.


James McBride Gaston collection

James McBride Gaston collection
Creator: Gaston, James M. B. (James McBride), 1824-1889
Date: 1847 - 1848
Diary of James McBride Gaston and his experience traveling the Santa Fe Trail during the Mexican War. Born on March 22, 1824 in Randolph County, Illinois to William Gaston, Jr. and his wife Elizabeth Couch, Gaston came from a line of soldiers. His father, from Kentucky, served in the War of 1812, and his grandfather William Gaston, Sr. of South Carolina served in the Revolutionary War. James himself enlisted with the 1st Illinois Infantry Regiment, Co. C in the spring of 1847 and made the march via the Santa Fe Trail to New Mexico. He returned to Illinois in the fall of 1848. In July 1852, Gaston married Mary Margaret Storment, daughter of John Storment and Margaret Kell, in Marion County, Illinois. When civil war broke out, he re-enlisted, serving in Co. G, 22nd Illinois Infantry Regiment. He received a gunshot wound in November 1861 at the Battle of Belmont (Missouri), but continued to serve for three years, until discharged with a disability in 1864. He held the rank of corporal in both wars. Mary died in 1866, two months after the birth of their fourth child, only one of whom lived to maturity (Margaret Elizabeth Gaston, who died in 1898). In 1867, James married again, to Mrs. Nancy Jane Hill Creel, who died in 1891. James Gaston died on February 27, 1889 and was buried with both wives in Marion County, Illinois.


Kickapoo Corral, Arkansas River, Cowley County, Kansas

Kickapoo Corral, Arkansas River, Cowley County, Kansas
Date: Bulk 1847-1905
This photograph represents the Kickapoo Corral at the Arkansas River in Winfield, Cowley County, Kansas. The photo was taken by H.E. Shilliman (1847-1909) in Winfield, Kansas. In the bottom right corner in pencil the number 102 is written.


United States Office of Indian Affairs, Central Superintendency, St. Louis, Missouri. Volume 14, Property returns

United States Office of Indian Affairs, Central Superintendency, St. Louis, Missouri. Volume 14, Property returns
Creator: United States. Office of Indian Affairs. Central Superintendency
Date: 1844-1849
This volume contains property returns as recorded by Thomas H. Harvey, Superintendent of Indian Affairs, Central Superintendency, in St. Louis, Missouri. Some of the property accounted for includes stationary, books, office furniture, safes, agricultural implements, blacksmith's tools, and rifles. Partial funding for the digitization of these records was provided by the National Park Service. Volumes 14 and 15 are bound together.


United States Office of Indian Affairs, Central Superintendency, St. Louis, Missouri. Volume 15, Accounts

United States Office of Indian Affairs, Central Superintendency, St. Louis, Missouri. Volume 15, Accounts
Creator: United States. Office of Indian Affairs. Central Superintendency
Date: 1844-1849
This volume contains records of current accounts of the Superintendent of Indian Affairs, Central Superintendency, at St. Louis, Missouri. Thomas H. Harvey held this position from 1844-1849. Expenditures are recorded for several sub-agencies, including Fort Leavenworth, Upper Missouri, Council Bluffs, Great Nemaha and Osage River, and the various Indian tribes in each region. These expenditures included salaries for blacksmiths and interpreters, annuities, and provisions. Partial funding for the digitization of these records was provided by the National Park Service. Volumes 14 and 15 are bound together.


United States Office of Indian Affairs, Central Superintendency, St. Louis, Missouri. Volume 9, Correspondence

United States Office of Indian Affairs, Central Superintendency, St. Louis, Missouri. Volume 9, Correspondence
Creator: United States. Office of Indian Affairs. Central Superintendency
Date: 1847-1855
This volume contains correspondence sent by the Office of Indian Affairs, Central Superintendency in St. Louis, Missouri from 1847-1855. The correspondence was sent by the Superintendents of Indian Affairs to the Commissioners of Indian Affairs. During this period the superintendents included Thomas H. Harvey, David D. Mitchell, and Alfred Cumming; the commissioners included William Medill, Orlando Brown, Luke Lea, and George Washington Manypenny. Topics of discussion focused on the appropriation of federal funds for treaties, the hiring and firing of Indian agents, and the transportation and storage of goods and supplies. Partial funding for the digitization of these records was provided by the National Park Service. A searchable, full-text (PDF) transcription is available under "External Links" below.


Vote the Land Free stamp

Vote the Land Free stamp
Date: between 1844 and 1848
This stamp was used by the National Reform Party to impress the phrase "Vote the Land Free" on U. S. coins in the 1840s. In 1844, the National Reform Association (NRA) was organized by George Henry Evans in New York City to lobby Congress for free homesteads in the West. By marking coins, the NRA hoped to attract recognition. The donor, Ellis Smalley was a blacksmith, political activist, and former probate judge near Council Grove. Smalley was a delegate from Plainfield, New Jersey, at the first convention held in October of 1845, and was elected Secretary of the National Reform Association. Among his duties, on May 16, 1844, Smalley and other members of the NRA signed a letter to Joseph Smith, leader of the Mormon Church, asking Smith's opinions concerning public lands. In 1848, NRA was absorbed into other political movements, like the Free Soil and Abolitionists. The efforts of the NRA led to the Homestead Act of 1862. By 1878 Smalley had moved to Kansas and was noted as a member of the City Council of Council Grove.


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