Kansas MemoryKansas Memory

Kansas Historical SocietyKansas Historical Society

-

Log In

Username:

Password:

After login, go to:

Register
Forgot Username?
Forgot Password?

Browse Users
Contact us

-

Martha Farnsworth

-

Podcast Archive

Governor Mike Hayden Interview
Details
Listen Now
Subscribe - iTunesSubscribe - RSS

More podcasts

-

Popular Item

undated 1977 (Box 49, Folder 4)

-

Random Item

James John Marr, World War I soldier James John Marr, World War I soldier

-

Site Statistics

Total images: 732,046
Bookbag items: 38,116
Registered users: 11,693

-

About

Kansas Memory has been created by the Kansas State Historical Society to share its historical collections via the Internet. Read more.

-

Syndication

Matching items: 21

Category Filters

Objects and Artifacts - Archeological Artifacts - Site Name - Sharps Creek

Search within these results


       

Search Tips

Start Over | RSS Feed RSS Feed

View: Image Only | Title Only | Detailed
Sort by: TitleSort by Title, Ascending | Date | Creator | Newest

Showing 1 - 21 of 21 (results per page: 10 | 25 | 50)


Awls from the Sharps Creek Site, 14MP408

Awls from the Sharps Creek Site, 14MP408
Date: 1500-1800 CE
These three awls were recovered from the Sharps Creek site in McPherson County, a Great Bend aspect (ancestral Wichita) village that was occupied during the Late Ceramic period. Awls were usually made from deer bone and used as a perforating tool in soft material, like hides, and possibly in basket and pottery manufacturing. The two awls on the left were recovered during excavation at the site in 1968 by Kansas Historical Society archeologists. The smaller awl on the right was recovered during excavations at the 1993 Kansas Archeology Training Program field school.


Bone Beads from the Sharps Creek Site, 14MP408

Bone Beads from the Sharps Creek Site, 14MP408
Date: 1500-1800 CE
Shown are four bone beads recovered from the Sharps Creek site, a Great Bend aspect (ancestral Wichita) village in McPherson County. The beads were made from a section of bird bone. They were scored, then cut or snapped, and finally had their edges smoothed, to form the tabular beads. The shortest bead was recovered during excavations at the 1993 Kansas Archeology Training program field school and the other three were donated to the Kansas Historical Society in 1993.


Ceramic Handles from the Sharps Creek Site, 14MP408

Ceramic Handles from the Sharps Creek Site, 14MP408
Date: 1500-1800 CE
These four ceramic handles were just a few of the many recovered from the Sharps Creek village in McPherson County during the 1993 Kansas Archeology Training Program. The large loop style handle on the far left and the small strap handle next to it were both attached to the vessel using rivets. The rivets were made of clay, and created by inserting a portion of the handle into a hole in the pot and then smoothing over the interior. The two wide strap handles on the right may have been attached by being molded onto the lip and the body of their vessels.


Cone Tinkler from the Sharps Creek Site, 14MP408

Cone Tinkler from the Sharps Creek Site, 14MP408
Date: 1500-1800 CE
This cone tinkler was recovered by Kansas Historical Society Archeologists and volunteers during the 1993 Kansas Archeology Training Program field school at the Sharps Creek site. Tinklers were used to decorate hair, clothes and other objects. The Sharps Creek site is a Great Bend aspect (ancestral Wichita) village in McPherson County occupied during the Middle Ceramic period.


Decorated Vessel Handle from the Sharps Creek Site, 14MP408

Decorated Vessel Handle from the Sharps Creek Site, 14MP408
Date: 1500-1800 CE
This handle sherd was recovered from the Sharps Creek archeological site during the 1993 Kansas Archeological Training Program field school. This wide strap handle has four deeply incised lines as decoration. It was molded to the top of the vessel rim, but riveted to the vessel at its base. The Sharps Creek site was a Great Bend aspect (ancestral Wichita) village in McPherson County that was occupied during the Late Ceramic period.


Diminutive Biface from the Sharps Creek Site, 14MP408

Diminutive Biface from the Sharps Creek Site, 14MP408
Date: 1500-1800 CE
This biface, extremely small yet quite refined, was recovered during excavations at the Sharps Creek site at the 1993 Kansas Archeology Training Program field school. A biface is a chipped stone tool that has been modified on both faces, or sides. This example may have been made a chert type called Alibates agatized dolomite, which outcrops in the Texas panhandle at the Canadian River valley. The Sharps Creek site is a Great Bend aspect (ancestral Wichita) village in McPherson County.


Drills from the Sharps Creek Site, 14MP408

Drills from the Sharps Creek Site, 14MP408
Date: 1500-1800 CE
These four drills are just a few of those recovered from the 1993 Kansas Archeology Training Program field school at the Sharps Creek site, a Great Bend aspect (ancestral Wichita) village in McPherson County. Drills were used to bore holes in softer materials than the drill itself, such as hides, shell, wood, or soft stone. The two drills on the left are made of Smoky Hill silicified chalk, a type of chert that outcrops in western Kansas and Nebraska. The two drills on the right are of an unknown material.


Fresno Arrow Points from the Sharps Creek Site, 14MP408

Fresno Arrow Points from the Sharps Creek Site, 14MP408
Date: 1500-1800 CE
These five Fresno arrow points were recovered from excavations at the Sharps Creek site during the 1993 Kansas Archeology Training Program field school. Archeologists identify Fresno points as being unnotched with a triangular shape. The three points on the left are made of Florence chert. The two on the right are of an unknown chert. The far left point was heat-treated prior to its completion in order to make a better knappable chert. The Sharps Creek site is a Great Bend aspect (ancestral Wichita) village in McPherson County.


Fresno Arrow Points from the Sharps Creek Site, 14MP408

Fresno Arrow Points from the Sharps Creek Site, 14MP408
Date: 1500-1800 CE
These four Fresno arrow points were recovered from excavations at the Sharps Creek site during excavations by Kansas Historical Society Archeologists in 1968 and during the 1993 Kansas Archeology Training Program field school. Archeologists identify Fresno points as being unnotched with a triangular shape. The Sharps Creek site is a Great Bend aspect (ancestral Wichita) village site in McPherson County.


Fresno Arrow Points from the Sharps Creek Site, 14MP408

Fresno Arrow Points from the Sharps Creek Site, 14MP408
Date: 1500-1800 CE
These three Fresno arrow points were recovered from excavations at the Sharps Creek site in 1968 by Kansas Historical Society archeologists. Archeologists identify Fresno points as being unnotched with a triangular shape. The three points are made of Permian chert. All were heat-treated prior to their completion in order to make a better knappable chert. The Sharps Creek site is a Great Bend aspect (ancestral Wichita) village in McPherson County.


Great Bend aspect Pottery from the Sharps Creek Site, 14MP408

Great Bend aspect Pottery from the Sharps Creek Site, 14MP408
Date: 1500-1800 CE
These two vessel fragments were recovered from the Sharps Creek site during the 1993 Kansas Archeological Training Program field school. Both vessels are small jars with outflaring rims, strap handles and sand temper. One vessels handle is decorated with vertical parallel lines attached with a rivet at the base of the handle and molded to the lip at the top. The other vessel fragment is actually four sherds that were refitted together. This pot shows charred residue inside and out. The Sharps Creek site is a Great Bend aspect (ancestral Wichita) village site in McPherson County that was occupied during the Late Ceramic period.


Great Bend aspect Rim Sherds from the Sharps Creek Site, 14MP408

Great Bend aspect Rim Sherds from the Sharps Creek Site, 14MP408
Date: 1500-1800 CE
These two rim sherds were recovered from the Sharps Creek site during the 1993 Kansas Archeological Training Program field school. The sherds represent two different styles of pottery. One has an upright rim and finger pinching decoration below the lip with thick walls and grit temper. The other has an out flaring rim with incised diagonal lines on the lip, thin walls and hematite inclusions within the clay. The Sharps Creek site is a Great Bend aspect (ancestral Wichita) village in McPherson County that was occupied during the Late Ceramic period.


Modified Bone from the Sharps Creek Site, 14MP408

Modified Bone from the Sharps Creek Site, 14MP408
Date: 1500-1800 CE
These five modified bones were shaped, polished and had holes drilled into their ends, possibly for use as an ornament or pendant. They were recovered at the 1992 and 1993 Kansas Archeology Training Program field school at the Sharps Creek site, a Great Bend aspect (ancestral Wichita) village in McPherson County.


Pipe Drills from the Sharps Creek Site, 14MP408

Pipe Drills from the Sharps Creek Site, 14MP408
Date: 1500-1800 CE
These two pipe drills were recovered from excavations at the Sharps Creek site during the 1993 Kansas Archeology Training Program field school. Drills were used to bore holes in softer materials than the drill itself, such as hides, shell, wood, or, as with these examples, the making of pipes out of soft stone. The Sharps Creek site is a Great Bend aspect (ancestral Wichita) village in McPherson County.


Pipestone Elbow Pipe from the Sharps Creek Site, 14MP408

Pipestone Elbow Pipe from the Sharps Creek Site, 14MP408
Date: 1500-1800 CE
This pipe was recovered from the Sharps Creek site, a Great Bend aspect (ancestral Wichita) village site in McPherson County, and donated to the Kansas Historical Society in 1993. The soft fine grained material of pipestone enabled the pipe's maker to carve it into its elbow-like shape. The manner in which this pipe broke enables us to see the parallel scars on the interior, which were made during its production. Additionally, the black residue visible is likely dottle (tobacco remnants). Pipes were used during trade negotiations and to mark special occasions. In Kansas, these pipes generally were made by American Indians between 1350 to 1850 CE.


Pipestone Elbow Pipes from the Sharps Creek Site, 14MP408

Pipestone Elbow Pipes from the Sharps Creek Site, 14MP408
Date: 1500-1800 CE
These three elbow pipes were recovered from the Sharps Creek site, a Great Bend aspect (ancestral Wichita) village site in McPherson County, and donated to the Kansas Historical Society in 1993. The two pipes on the left were broken after use as is evidenced by the dottle (tobacco residue) traces left on the interior of the pipes. The soft fine grained material of pipestone enabled the pipe's maker to carve them into their elbow-like shape. Pipes were used during trade negotiations and to mark special occasions. In Kansas, these pipes are generally made by American Indians between 1650 to 1850.


Pipestone Pendants from the Sharps Creek Site, 14MP408

Pipestone Pendants from the Sharps Creek Site, 14MP408
Date: 1500-1800 CE
These two pipestone pendants were recovered from the Sharps Creek site, a Great Bend aspect (ancestral Wichita) village in McPherson County during the 1993 Kansas Archeology Training Program field school. The two pendants have different attachment methods. One used notches on either side of top portion of the pendant while the other had a hole drilled through the top.


Pottery Fragments from the Sharps Creek Site, 14MP408

Pottery Fragments from the Sharps Creek Site, 14MP408
Date: 1500-1800 CE
These fragments of a Great Bend Aspect vessel were excavated during the 1993 Kansas Archeology Training Program at the Sharps Creek site in McPherson County. The vessel fragments were reconstructed to reveal a large jar with a crenelated lip, a smooth body and a loop handle riveted to the body. Traces of burned cooking residue remain both inside and outside of the vessel. The site was a Great Bend aspect (ancestral Wichita) village occupied during the Late Ceramic period.


Scrapers from the Sharps Creek Site, 14MP408

Scrapers from the Sharps Creek Site, 14MP408
Date: 1500-1800 CE
Shown are just a few of the many scrapers that were recovered from the Sharps Creek site during the 1993 Kansas Archeology Training Program field school. Scrapers would have likely been hafted on a handle and used to scrape hides. The tools would have required periodic resharpening. The two scrapers on the left are made of a chert called Smoky Hill silicified chalk. The three on the right are made of Florence chert, two of which have been heat-treated in order to improve knapping. The final scraper is of Alibates flint from the Canadian River valley in Texas. The Sharps Creek site is a Great Bend aspect (ancestral Wichita) village in McPherson County that was occupied during the Late Ceramic period.


Shell Ornaments from the Sharps Creek Site, 14MP408

Shell Ornaments from the Sharps Creek Site, 14MP408
Date: 1500-1800 CE
These two shell ornaments were recovered from the 1993 Kansas Archeology Training Program field school at the Sharps Creek site. The ornaments, both now broken, were made from local mussel shell and have two drilled attachment holes. The Sharps Creek site was a Great Bend aspect (ancestral Wichita) village occupied during the Late Ceramic Period.


Side-Notched Arrow Points from Sharps Creek Site, 14MP408

Side-Notched Arrow Points from Sharps Creek Site, 14MP408
Date: 1500-1800 CE
These three side-notched arrow points were among many recovered from the Sharps Creek site during excavations in 1968 by Kansas Historical Society archeologists. The two points on the left were made of Permian chert. The far left point was heat-treated prior to its completion in order to make a better knappable chert. The point on the right was made of Alibates flint that can be found in the Canadian River valley in Texas. The Sharps Creek site is a Great Bend aspect (ancestral Wichita) village site in McPherson County.


Showing 1 - 21

Copyright © 2007-2020 - Kansas Historical Society - Contact Us
This website was developed in part with funding provided by the Information Network of Kansas.