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Objects and Artifacts - Archeological Artifacts - Site Name - Curry

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Adze or Axe from the Curry Site, 14GR301

Adze or Axe from the Curry Site, 14GR301
Date: 1200-1400 CE
This chipped stone tool, possibly either an adze or an axe, was most likely used for woodworking. It was donated to the Kansas Historical Society in 1984. The Curry site in Greenwood County was a multicomponent (multiple occupations) site occupied periodically during the Archaic, Early Ceramic and Middle Ceramic Periods.


Bird Bone Beads from the Curry Site, 14GR301

Bird Bone Beads from the Curry Site, 14GR301
Date: 1200-1400 CE
These bird bone beads and others were recovered from the Curry site in Greenwood County, and donated to the Kansas Historical Society in 1984. The Curry site was a multicomponent (multiple occupations) site occupied periodically during the Archaic, Early Ceramic and Middle Ceramic Periods. The beads were made from a section of bird bone, as bird bones are mostly hollow. They were scored, then cut or snapped, and finally had their edges smoothed, to form the tubular beads. Incised spirals and rings were added to each bead for decoration.


Bison Scapula Hoe from the Curry Site, 14GR301

Bison Scapula Hoe from the Curry Site, 14GR301
Date: 1200-1400 CE
This portion of a bison scapula hoe was recovered from the Curry site and donated to the Kansas Historical Society in 1984. The Curry site is a multicomponent (multiple occupations) village in Greenwood County. The scapula was sharpened and attached to a handle and used as a hoe in gardening.


Bisque Doll from 14GR301

Bisque Doll from 14GR301
Date: Unknown
This bisque doll head and body was recovered from the Curry site in Greenwood County and donated to the Kansas Historical Society in 1984. The Curry site was a multicomponent (multiple occupations) site occupied periodically during the Archaic, Early Ceramic and Middle Ceramic Periods. However, this doll shows that there was also modern material recovered at the site. The doll had jointed arms and legs and may have once had a painted face and hair, though, if so, no trace remains.


Bone Awls from the Curry Site, 14GR301

Bone Awls from the Curry Site, 14GR301
Date: 500 BCE-1500 CE
These two bone awls were found at different times by different people at the Curry Archeological Site in Greenwood County. The longest awl was a donation to the Kansas Historical Society in 1984 by the site's owner and was reconstructed from three pieces. The shorter awl was recovered in two pieces from excavations in 1966. They were used to make holes in soft materials, like hides, and possibly in basket and pottery manufacturing.


Brass Beads from the Curry Site, 14GR301

Brass Beads from the Curry Site, 14GR301
Date: 1200-1600 CE
These 13 brass beads were recovered from the Curry site and donated to the Kansas Historical Society in 1984. The Curry site is a multicomponent (multiple occupations) village in Greenwood County. These beads, similar to a Rondelle shape, were likely traded for other goods.


Effigy Pipe from the Curry Site, 14GR301

Effigy Pipe from the Curry Site, 14GR301
Date: 1200-1400 CE
This broken fragment was once part of a stone pipe that had a carved portion that resembled an animal. It was found at the Curry site, a village site in Greenwood County, and donated to the Kansas Historical Society in 1984.


Fossil Crinoid Beads from the Curry Site, 14GR301

Fossil Crinoid Beads from the Curry Site, 14GR301
Date: 500-1600 CE
These fossil crinoid beads were recovered from the Curry site in Greenwood County and donated to the Kansas Historical Society in 1984. Crinoids were marine animals that lived in the shallow sea that covered Kansas over 245 million years ago. The bead maker would have drilled the center out of the bead prior to threading them into a necklace or sewing them onto clothing. The Curry site was a multicomponent (multiple occupations) site occupied periodically during the Archaic, Early Ceramic and Middle Ceramic periods.


Greenwood Phase Vessel from the Curry Site, 14GR301

Greenwood Phase Vessel from the Curry Site, 14GR301
Date: 1200-1400 CE
This reconstructed vessel was recovered in fragmented sherds from the Curry site in Greenwood County and donated to the Kansas Historical Society in 1984. The vessel has an elongated body with a conical base. It shows six lace crack holes, which were drilled into the sherds after a crack developed and then laced with some type of material such a leather. An orange colored plaster was added to fill in the empty spaces during reconstruction. The Curry site was a multicomponent (multiple occupations) site occupied periodically during the Archaic, Early Ceramic and Middle Ceramic Periods.


Greenwood Phase Vessel from the Curry Site, 14GR301

Greenwood Phase Vessel from the Curry Site, 14GR301
Date: 1200-1400 CE
This reconstructed vessel was recovered in fragmented sherds from the Curry site in Greenwood County and donated to the Kansas Historical Society in 1984. The vessel has an elongated body with a conical base. It shows six lace crack holes, which were drilled into the vessel after a crack developed and then laced with some type of material such a leather. An orange colored plaster was added to fill in the empty spaces during reconstruction. The Curry site was a multicomponent (multiple occupations) site occupied periodically during the Archaic, Early Ceramic and Middle Ceramic Periods.


Mano and Nutting Stone from the Curry Site, 14GR301

Mano and Nutting Stone from the Curry Site, 14GR301
Date: 1200-1400 CE
This combination mano and nutting stone, was recovered from the Curry site and donated to the Kansas Historical Society in 1984. One side of this ground stone tool served as the topmost millstone for grinding foods by hand on a grinding stone. The other side of the tool served as a nutting stone, used for securing a nut while it was being cracked open. Groundstone tools like this one are made by pecking a hard stone into a rough shape and then grinding and polishing it into its final state. The Curry site is a multicomponent (multiple occupations) village site in Greenwood County.


Manos from the Curry Site, 14GR301

Manos from the Curry Site, 14GR301
Date: 1200-1400 CE
Manos, stones used as the topmost millstone for grinding foods by hand on a grinding stone or metate, can come in different shapes and sizes. Manos like these are made by pecking a hard stone into a rough shape and then grinding and polishing it into its final state. These three were recovered from the Curry site and donated to the Kansas Historical Society in 1984. The Curry site is a multicomponent (multiple occupations) village site in Greenwood County.


Modified Bone from the Curry Site, 14GR301

Modified Bone from the Curry Site, 14GR301
Date: 1200-1400 CE
The purpose of this modified bone is not completely understood. The deer-sized bone may have been manufacturing debris left after making another bone tool. The whitened appearance is a result of sun bleaching from being on the surface. It was recovered from the Curry site in Greenwood County and donated to the Kansas Historical Society in 1984.


Modified Shell from the Curry Site, 14GR301

Modified Shell from the Curry Site, 14GR301
Date: 1200-1400 CE
This modified shell tool was recovered from the Curry site, a multicomponent (multiple occupations) village in Greenwood County. It was donated to the Kansas Historical Society in 1984. The tool was made from local mussel shell and was used for piercing other materials.


Red-Slipped Pottery Sherds from the Curry Site, 14GR301

Red-Slipped Pottery Sherds from the Curry Site, 14GR301
Date: 1200-1400 CE
These two pottery sherds were recovered from the Curry site, a multicomponent (multiple occupations) village site in Greenwood County and donated to the Kansas Historical Society in 1984. Red-slip (a decorative technique) is unusual for eastern Kansas.


Rim Sherd from the Curry Site, 14GR301

Rim Sherd from the Curry Site, 14GR301
Date: 1200-1400 CE
This distinctive rim sherd shows a series of nested chevrons (a V-shaped pattern) with a series of punctates below. It was recovered during excavations at the Curry site, a village in Greenwood County. This decorated pottery sherd is of a style which is unusual for the time and place.


Scraper from the Curry Site, 14GR301

Scraper from the Curry Site, 14GR301
Date: 1200-1400 CE
This large scraper was recovered from the Curry site and donated to the Kansas Historical Society in 1984. The scraper was likely hafted onto a handle and used to scrape hides. It would have required periodic resharpening. The Curry site is a multicomponent (multiple occupations) village site in Greenwood County.


Shell Ornament from the Curry Site, 14GR301

Shell Ornament from the Curry Site, 14GR301
Date: 1200-1400 CE
This shell ornament was recovered from the Curry site and donated to the Kansas Historical Society in 1984. It was made from a local Greenwood County mussel shell. The slit was probably carved into it so it could be hung from a cord as an ornament.


Southwestern Pottery from the Curry Site, 14GR301

Southwestern Pottery from the Curry Site, 14GR301
Date: 1000-1500 CE
Pottery like these two refitted sherds was not a typical find at the Curry Site in Greenwood County. These sherds were reconstructed prior to it's donation in 1984. They came from a polychrome (multiple colors) jar and was likely traded into the site from the southwest. The jar could have been painted either before or after firing, though the colors, when it was new, would have been more vibrant if painting followed firing. The Curry site was a multicomponent (multiple occupations) site occupied periodically during the Archaic, Early Ceramic and Middle Ceramic periods.


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