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130th Gun Pits

130th Gun Pits
Creator: Hughes, James Clark, 1888-1964
Date: November 8, 1917
Soldiers of the 130th Field Artillery digging gun pits at Fort Sill. Captain Hughes may be the soldier at the far right. One soldier is holding a pick ax. Others are working with shovels. In 1917 James C. Hughes was Captain of Battery C, 130th Field Artillery, Kansas National Guard. He was stationed at Camp Doniphan, Oklahoma, for field artillery training. Camp Doniphan is adjacent to Fort Sill which is just outside Lawton, Oklahoma. The 130th Field Artillery, Kansas National Guard, trained at both in 1917 and 1918 as part of the 35th Division. The 35th Division was constituted in 1917 as one of the 17 National Guard divisions authorized for service in World War I. The division was organized from the National Guard of Kansas and Missouri. The 35th included three machinegun battalions, three field artillery regiments, four infantry regiments, one engineer regiment and one signal battalion with a total strength of 26,373. A full biography of James Clark Hughes is available at the link below to Kansapedia.


75mm American, gun

75mm American, gun
Creator: Hughes, James Clark, 1888-1964
Date: 1919
This is a 75mm American gun which was photographed by Captain Hughes while with the Army of Occupation. James C. Hughes, as part of the 35th Division, left Fort Sill, Oklahoma, and traveled to Hoboken, New Jersey, where he boarded the troop ship "Ceramic" on May 18, 1918. Hughes arrived in Liverpool, England, on June 1, 1918 and then landed at Le Havre, France, on June 9, 1918. Hughes fought in the battles of St. Michael and the Meuse-Argonne. He was at Verdun on Armistice Day, November 11, 1918. He took no photos of the actual fighting. He did take many photographs after the war as part of the Army of Occupation until he left France on July 18, 1919. A full biography of James Clark Hughes is available at the link below to Kansapedia.


Asian clogs

Asian clogs
Date: between 1941 and 1945
Pair of Asian clogs with wooden soles. The soles are carved in a single piece and have low heels. Black leather strap across the instep. Owners initials are carved into the soles. Colonel James C. Hughes acquired the clogs while being held as a Japanese Prisoner of War during World War II. Born in Topeka, Kansas, in 1888, Hughes served in the Mexican Border Conflict, World War I, and World War II. During the latter conflict, he commanded a Philippine regiment (Filipino soldiers led by American officers), which surrendered in 1942 on the Bataan peninsula. Hughes spent the next 41 months in various Japanese P.O.W. camps. He was liberated by Russian forces at Camp Hoten, Manchuria, in 1945. Hughes died in 1964 and is buried in Arlington National Cemetery.


Aspirin wrapper

Aspirin wrapper
Date: between 1941 and 1945
Brown paper wrapper with the word "Aspirin" handwritten on one side. Colonel James C. Hughes acquired the aspirin while being held as a Japanese Prisoner of War during World War II. Born in Topeka, Kansas, in 1888, Hughes served in the Mexican Border Conflict, World War I, and World War II. During the latter conflict, he commanded a Philippine regiment (Filipino soldiers led by American officers), which surrendered in 1942 on the Bataan peninsula. Hughes spent the next 41 months in various Japanese P.O.W. camps. He was liberated by Russian forces at Camp Hoten, Manchuria, in 1945. Hughes died in 1964 and is buried in Arlington National Cemetery.


Bamboo sandals

Bamboo sandals
Date: between 1941 and 1945
Pair of natural fiber sandals. The strap on one of the sandals has been repaired with a piece of army green cotton fabric. Colonel James C. Hughes acquired the sandals while being held as a Japanese Prisoner of War during World War II. Born in Topeka, Kansas, in 1888, Hughes served in the Mexican Border Conflict, World War I, and World War II. During the latter conflict, he commanded a Philippine regiment (Filipino soldiers led by American officers), which surrendered in 1942 on the Bataan peninsula. Hughes spent the next 41 months in various Japanese P.O.W. camps. He was liberated by Russian forces at Camp Hoten, Manchuria, in 1945. Hughes died in 1964 and is buried in Arlington National Cemetery.


Battery C Officers

Battery C Officers
Creator: Hughes, James Clark, 1888-1964
Date: 1917
Five officers of Battery C standing around a tripod. One officer, who looks like James C. Hughes, is peering through the field glasses attached to the top of the tripod. In 1917 James C. Hughes was Captain of Battery C, 130th Field Artillery, Kansas National Guard and stationed at Camp Doniphan, Oklahoma, where this photograph was taken. A full biography of James Clark Hughes is available on Kansapedia.


Besancon: N. E. and down from Citadel, France

Besancon: N. E. and down from Citadel, France
Creator: Hughes, James Clark, 1888-1964
Date: February 25, 1919
Captain Hughes photographed a view of Besancon, France from the citadel, high over the city. James C. Hughes, as part of the 35th Division, left Fort Sill, Oklahoma, and traveled to Hoboken, New Jersey, where he boarded the troop ship "Ceramic" on May 18, 1918. Hughes arrived in Liverpool, England, on June 1, 1918 and then landed at Le Havre, France, on June 9, 1918. Hughes fought in the battles of St. Michael and the Meuse-Argonne. He was at Verdun on Armistice Day, November 11, 1918. He took no photos of the actual fighting. He did take many photographs after the war as part of the Army of Occupation until he left France on July 18, 1919. A full biography of James Clark Hughes is available at the link below to Kansapedia.


Board game set

Board game set
Date: between 1942 and 1945
Portable cardboard game board for playing Chinese Checkers, chess, and checkers. Colonel James C. Hughes received the game in a Red Cross box while being held as a Prisoner of War (POW) by the Japanese during World War II. Born in Topeka, Kansas, in 1888, Hughes served in the Mexican Border Conflict, World War I, and World War II. In 1942, he was captured by the Japanese on the Bataan peninsula and spent the next 41 months in various Japanese POW camps. He was liberated by Russian forces at Camp Hoten, Manchuria, in 1945. Hughes died in 1964 and is buried in Arlington National Cemetery.


Box part

Box part
Date: between 1942 and 1945
Part of a cardboard box that once held rations sent by the American Red Cross to Prisoners of War. Colonel James C. Hughes acquired this ration box while being held as a Prisoner of War (POW) by the Japanese during World War II. Born in Topeka, Kansas, in 1888, Hughes served in the Mexican Border Conflict, World War I, and World War II. In 1942, he was captured by the Japanese on the Bataan peninsula and spent the next 41 months in various Japanese POW camps. He was liberated by Russian forces at Camp Hoten, Manchuria, in 1945. Hughes died in 1964 and is buried in Arlington National Cemetery.


C & D Battery Officers

C & D Battery Officers
Creator: Hughes, James Clark, 1888-1964
Date: 1917
Nine officers of Battery C and D of the 130th Field Artillery, Kansas National Guard, posing in front of an ivy covered brick building at Camp Doniphan. James Clark Hughes is fourth from the right. In 1917 James C. Hughes was Captain of Battery C, 130th Field Artillery, Kansas National Guard and stationed at Camp Doniphan, Oklahoma, where this photograph was taken. A full biography of James Clark Hughes is available on Kansapedia.


C & D Battery Officers

C & D Battery Officers
Creator: Hughes, James Clark, 1888-1964
Date: 1917
Nine officers of Battery C and D of the 130th Field Artillery, Kansas National Guard, posing in front of an ivy covered brick building at Camp Doniphan. James Clark Hughes is fifth from the right. In 1917 James C. Hughes was Captain of Battery C, 130th Field Artillery, Kansas National Guard and stationed at Camp Doniphan, Oklahoma, where this photograph was taken. A full biography of James Clark Hughes is available on Kansapedia.


Chopsticks

Chopsticks
Date: between 1942 and 1945
Pair of ebony chopsticks. Colonel James C. Hughes acquired the chopsticks while being held as a Prisoner of War (POW) by the Japanese during World War II. Born in Topeka, Kansas, in 1888, Hughes served in the Mexican Border Conflict, World War I, and World War II. In 1942, he was captured by the Japanese on the Bataan peninsula and spent the next 41 months in various Japanese POW camps. He was liberated by Russian forces at Camp Hoten, Manchuria, in 1945. Hughes died in 1964 and is buried in Arlington National Cemetery.


Chopsticks

Chopsticks
Date: between 1942 and 1945
Pair of ebony chopsticks. Colonel James C. Hughes acquired the chopsticks while being held as a Prisoner of War (POW) by the Japanese during World War II. Born in Topeka, Kansas, in 1888, Hughes served in the Mexican Border Conflict, World War I, and World War II. In 1942, he was captured by the Japanese on the Bataan peninsula and spent the next 41 months in various Japanese POW camps. He was liberated by Russian forces at Camp Hoten, Manchuria, in 1945. Hughes died in 1964 and is buried in Arlington National Cemetery.


Chopsticks

Chopsticks
Date: between 1942 and 1945
Bundle of ten chopsticks held together by a piece of metal wire. Most of the chopsticks are bamboo; one is made of ebony. Colonel James C. Hughes acquired the chopsticks while being held as a Prisoner of War (POW) by the Japanese during World War II. Born in Topeka, Kansas, in 1888, Hughes served in the Mexican Border Conflict, World War I, and World War II. In 1942, he was captured by the Japanese on the Bataan peninsula and spent the next 41 months in various Japanese POW camps. He was liberated by Russian forces at Camp Hoten, Manchuria, in 1945. Hughes died in 1964 and is buried in Arlington National Cemetery.


Cigarette pack

Cigarette pack
Date: 1934
Package of Porto Rican American Tobacco Company cigarettes. A tax stamp on the package indicates that they were sold in 1934. These cigarettes belonged to Colonel James C. Hughes. Born in Topeka, Kansas, in 1888, Hughes served in the Mexican Border Conflict, World War I, and World War II. In 1942, he was captured by the Japanese on the Bataan peninsula and spent the next 41 months in various Japanese POW camps. He was liberated by Russian forces at Camp Hoten, Manchuria, in 1945. Hughes died in 1964 and is buried in Arlington National Cemetery.


Cigarette pack

Cigarette pack
Date: between 1943 and 1945
Unopened package of cigarettes. The label on the package is printed in Japanese. Colonel James C. Hughes acquired this pack of cigarettes while being held as a Prisoner of War (POW) by the Japanese during World War II. Born in Topeka, Kansas, in 1888, Hughes served in the Mexican Border Conflict, World War I, and World War II. In 1942, he was captured by the Japanese on the Bataan peninsula and spent the next 41 months in various Japanese POW camps. He was liberated by Russian forces at Camp Hoten, Manchuria, in 1945. Hughes died in 1964 and is buried in Arlington National Cemetery.


Cigarette pack

Cigarette pack
Date: between 1943 and 1945
Unopened package of cigarettes. The label on the package is printed in Japanese. Colonel James C. Hughes acquired this pack of cigarettes while being held as a Prisoner of War (POW) by the Japanese during World War II. Born in Topeka, Kansas, in 1888, Hughes served in the Mexican Border Conflict, World War I, and World War II. In 1942, he was captured by the Japanese on the Bataan peninsula and spent the next 41 months in various Japanese POW camps. He was liberated by Russian forces at Camp Hoten, Manchuria, in 1945. Hughes died in 1964 and is buried in Arlington National Cemetery.


Colonel James C. Hughes diary

Colonel James C. Hughes diary
Creator: Hughes, James Clark, 1888-1964
Date: December 5, 1944-June 17, 1945
This diary is the fourth of five kept by Colonel James C. Hughes during his time as a prisoner of war in World War II. The diaries were started by Hughes one year after his capture and they managed to survive the war. The Japanese did not approve of journals or diaries, even for senior officers, and were subject to confiscation. Hughes had his diary seized several times. For this reason, prisoners had to censor what they wrote. They could not express their true feelings towards their captors or living conditions without harsh repercussions. Despite the censorship Hughes' diaries still covered his mental health, daily routine, camp food, capture, work, sickness, boredom, disease, moving to new camps, fellow soldiers, receiving letters and Red Cross boxes, and the occasional camp entertainment. During the later years they even contain wishful rumors about an end to the war.


Colonel James C. Hughes diary

Colonel James C. Hughes diary
Creator: Hughes, James Clark, 1888-1964
Date: April 01, 1944-December 04, 1944
This diary is the third of five kept by Colonel James C. Hughes during his time as a prisoner of war in World War II. The diaries were started by Hughes one year after his capture and they managed to survive the war. The Japanese did not approve of journals or diaries, even for senior officers, and were subject to confiscation. Hughes had his diary seized several times. For this reason, prisoners had to censor what they wrote. They could not express their true feelings towards their captors or living conditions without harsh repercussions. Despite the censorship Hughes' diaries still covered his mental health, daily routine, camp food, capture, work, sickness, boredom, disease, moving to new camps, fellow soldiers, receiving letters and Red Cross boxes, and the occasional camp entertainment. During the later years they even contain wishful rumors about an end to the war.


Colonel James C. Hughes diary

Colonel James C. Hughes diary
Creator: Hughes, James Clark, 1888-1964
Date: April 09, 1943-September 12, 1943
This diary is the first of five kept by Colonel James C. Hughes during his time as a prisoner of war in World War II. The diaries were started by Hughes one year after his capture and they managed to survive the war. The Japanese did not approve of journals or diaries, even for senior officers, and were subject to confiscation. Hughes had his diary seized several times. For this reason, prisoners had to censor what they wrote. They could not express their true feelings towards their captors or living conditions without harsh repercussions. Despite the censorship Hughes' diaries still covered his mental health, daily routine, camp food, capture, work, sickness, boredom, disease, moving to new camps, fellow soldiers, receiving letters and Red Cross boxes, and the occasional camp entertainment. During the later years they even contain wishful rumors about an end to the war.


Colonel James C. Hughes diary

Colonel James C. Hughes diary
Creator: Hughes, James Clark, 1888-1964
Date: September 13, 1943-May 31, 1944
This diary is the second of five kept by Colonel James C. Hughes during his time as a prisoner of war in World War II. The diaries were started by Hughes one year after his capture and they managed to survive the war. The Japanese did not approve of journals or diaries, even for senior officers, and were subject to confiscation. Hughes had his diary seized several times. For this reason, prisoners had to censor what they wrote. They could not express their true feelings towards their captors or living conditions without harsh repercussions. Despite the censorship Hughes' diaries still covered his mental health, daily routine, camp food, capture, work, sickness, boredom, disease, moving to new camps, fellow soldiers, receiving letters and Red Cross boxes, and the occasional camp entertainment. During the later years they even contain wishful rumors about an end to the war.


Colonel James C. Hughes diary

Colonel James C. Hughes diary
Creator: Hughes, James Clark, 1888-1964
Date: June 18, 1945-October 15, 1945
This diary is the fifth of five kept by Colonel James C. Hughes during his time as a prisoner of war in World War II. The diaries were started by Hughes one year after his capture and they managed to survive the war. The Japanese did not approve of journals or diaries, even for senior officers, and were subject to confiscation. Hughes had his diary seized several times. For this reason, prisoners had to censor what they wrote. They could not express their true feelings towards their captors or living conditions without harsh repercussions. Despite the censorship Hughes' diaries still covered his mental health, daily routine, camp food, capture, work, sickness, boredom, disease, moving to new camps, fellow soldiers, receiving letters and Red Cross boxes, and the occasional camp entertainment. During the later years they even contain wishful rumors about an end to the war.


Comb

Comb
Date: between 1941 and 1945
Small black plastic comb. Colonel James C. Hughes used this comb while being held as a Japanese Prisoner of War during World War II. Born in Topeka, Kansas, in 1888, Hughes served in the Mexican Border Conflict, World War I, and World War II. During the latter conflict, he commanded a Philippine regiment (Filipino soldiers led by American officers), which surrendered in 1942 on the Bataan peninsula. Hughes spent the next 41 months in various Japanese P.O.W. camps. He was liberated by Russian forces at Camp Hoten, Manchuria, in 1945. Hughes died in 1964 and is buried in Arlington National Cemetery.


Deck of cards

Deck of cards
Date: between 1942 and 1945
Standard deck of playing cards. Colonel James C. Hughes acquired these cards, possibly in a Red Cross box, while being held as a Prisoner of War (POW) by the Japanese during World War II. Born in Topeka, Kansas, in 1888, Hughes served in the Mexican Border Conflict, World War I, and World War II. In 1942, he was captured by the Japanese on the Bataan peninsula and spent the next 41 months in various Japanese POW camps. He was liberated by Russian forces at Camp Hoten, Manchuria, in 1945. Hughes died in 1964 and is buried in Arlington National Cemetery.


Devastation Nr. Vitry, France

Devastation Nr. Vitry, France
Creator: Hughes, James Clark, 1888-1964
Date: 1919
As part of the Army of Occupation after the end of World War I, Captain Hughes had the opportunity to photograph many places. He labeled the photo of this area taken in 1919 near Vitry-sur-Seine, a southeastern industrial and residential suburb of Paris as devastated. James C. Hughes, as part of the 35th Division, left Fort Sill, Oklahoma, and traveled to Hoboken, New Jersey, where he boarded the troop ship "Ceramic" on May 18, 1918. Hughes arrived in Liverpool, England, on June 1, 1918 and then landed at Le Havre, France, on June 9, 1918. Hughes fought in the battles of St. Michael and the Meuse-Argonne. He was at Verdun on Armistice Day, November 11, 1918. He took no photos of the actual fighting. He did take many photographs after the war as part of the Army of Occupation until he left France on July 18, 1919. A full biography of James Clark Hughes is available at the link below to Kansapedia.


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