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By the President of the United States, a proclamation: whereas it appears that the public good will be promoted by eliminating certain lands within the State of Kansas from the Kansas National Forest

By the President of the United States, a proclamation: whereas it appears that the public good will be promoted by eliminating certain lands within the State of Kansas from the Kansas National Forest
Creator: Taft, William Howard, 1857-1930
Date: February 24, 1913
This proclamation by President William H. Taft changes the boundaries of the Kansas National Forest. The original forest boundaries are illustrated on the diagram from the U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service. The forest was located west of Garden City and south of the Atchison, Topeka, and Sante Fe Railroad in Finney, Haskell, Grant, Kearny, and Hamilton counties. The proclamation excludes land west of Syracuse, Kansas and east of the Colorado border.


Chief Wiskigeamatyuk, Edith Roosevelt, Ethel Roosevelt, Agnes Martin and Chief Kootoose

Chief Wiskigeamatyuk, Edith Roosevelt, Ethel Roosevelt, Agnes Martin and Chief Kootoose
Date: Between 1901 and 1909
This is a photograph showing Chief Wiskigeamatyuk, a member of Potawatomi tribe; Edith Roosevelt; Ethel Roosevelt; Agnes Martin; and Chief Kootoose, member of the Potawatomi tribe. The photograph was taken in the Wisconsin woods. The Potawatomi were once located in the Great Lakes region before they were moved to Kansas Territory. On September 26, 1833, the Potawatomi of Illinois and Wisconsin signed the Treaty of Chicago, which ceded the last of their lands to the United States. The United States began removing the Potawatomi off of their Wisconsin lands between 1835 and 1838. Most Wisconsin Potawatomi went to Iowa and later to Kansas and settled on reservations. Despite this, many stayed in Wisconsin. About 200 of the Potawatomi who went to Iowa and Kansas returned to Wisconsin and settled in the vicinity of Wisconsin Rapids. The Wisconsin Potawatomi are federally recognized, but they are included on the tribal roll of the Kansas Potawatomi.


Governor Clyde M. Reed correspondence, forestry, fish and game

Governor Clyde M. Reed correspondence, forestry, fish and game
Creator: Kansas. Governor (1929-1931 : Reed)
Date: 1929-1930
This file includes subject correspondence relating to forestry, fish and game in Kansas, which is part of a bigger collection of Governor Clyde M. Reed correspondence.


My story of the development of the tree planting project in the Nebraska Sand Hills

My story of the development of the tree planting project in the Nebraska Sand Hills
Creator: Scott, Charles Anderson
Date: 1951
In these memoirs Charles A. Scott, a Kansas State University graduate from Westmoreland, Kansas, describes his experience in the Division of Forestry, U.S. Department of Agriculture from 1901 to 1907. His 1901 survey team, led by Royal S. Kellogg of Fay, Kansas, recommended sites for forest reserves in Nebraska. They researched tree growth across the Great Plains, including the growth of Catulpa trees in Hutchinson, Kansas. In 1902 President Theodore Roosevelt approved the recommended sites as the Dismal River, North Platte, and Niobrara Forest Reserves. Scott later served as State Forester and Professor of Forestry at Kansas State, Secretary of the Kansas State Horticultural Society, and State Director of the Shelterbelt Project. He also developed the first wholesale evergreen nursery west of the Missouri River.


[No title]

[No title]
Creator: Hughes, James Clark, 1888-1964
Date: [Date Unknown]
This view of trees was taken by Captain Hughes. The location or date is unknown. James C. Hughes, as part of the 35th Division, left Fort Sill, Oklahoma, and traveled to Hoboken, New Jersey, where he boarded the troop ship "Ceramic" on May 18, 1918. Hughes arrived in Liverpool, England, on June 1, 1918 and then landed at Le Havre, France, on June 9, 1918. Hughes fought in the battles of St. Michael and the Meuse-Argonne. He was at Verdun on Armistice Day, November 11, 1918. He took no photos of the actual fighting. He did take many photographs after the war as part of the Army of Occupation until he left France on July 18, 1919. A full biography of James Clark Hughes is available at the link below to Kansapedia.


Tree planting guidance

Tree planting guidance
Date: ca. 1900-1915
These three documents--"Some Mistakes in Tree-planting," "Recommendations for Guidance in Forest Planting on the Flood-damaged Lands of the Kansas River Valley," and "How To Transplant a Tree"--provide guidance on forest planting in Kansas. In 1905 President Theodore Roosevelt established the Kansas National Forest west of Garden City and south of the Arkansas River and Atchinson, Topeka, and Santa Fe Railroad. Just 10 years later, after severe drought killed most of the trees, President Wilson abolished the forest in 1915.


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