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Brigadier General Alfred Sully to Assistant Adjutant General Department Northwest, Milwaukee, Wisconsin

Brigadier General Alfred Sully to Assistant Adjutant General Department Northwest, Milwaukee, Wisconsin
Creator: Sully, Alfred
Date: December 30, 1864
This is a letter from Brigadier General Alfred Sully, Dubuque, Iowa, to Assistant Adjutant General Department Northwest, Milwaukee, Wisconsin, concerning Fanny Kelly who was a captive of the Huck-pa-pa Sioux. The letter contains details of her capture and negotiations for her release. Also, Brigadier General Sully requested reimbursement for clothing purchased for Mrs. Kelly and horses offered to the Sioux.


Fanny Kelly

Fanny Kelly
Creator: Spedden, W. L.
Date: Between 1880 and 1889
This is a cabinet card showing Fanny Kelly, who left Kansas with her family for Idaho in the summer of 1864. Their wagon train was attacked by Sioux Indians and Fanny Kelly, her niece Mary Kelly, Sarah Larimer and her son were captured and three men were killed. Sarah Larimer, her son, and Mary Kelly were able to escape; however, Mary was killed. Fanny spent nine months among the Sioux until her release at Fort Sully. She was reunited with her husband Josiah and they returned to Kansas. Josiah later died of cholera and she remarried William F. Gordon and lived in Washington, D.C. until her death on November 15, 1904.


Fanny Kelly

Fanny Kelly
Date: Between 1870 and 1879
This is a tintype showing Fanny Kelly, who left Kansas with her family for Idaho in the summer of 1864. Their wagon train was attacked by Sioux Indians and Fanny Kelly, her niece Mary Kelly, Sarah Larimer and her son were captured and three men were killed. Sarah Larimer, her son, and Mary Kelly were able to escape; however, Mary was killed. Fanny spent nine months among the Sioux until her release at Fort Sully. She was reunited with her husband Josiah and they returned to Kansas. He died of cholera, and later, she married William F. Gordon and lived in Washington, D.C. until her death on November 15, 1904.


Genealogy of the John A. Kelly Family and The Kelly Story (untitled)

Genealogy of the John A. Kelly Family and The Kelly Story (untitled)
Creator: Pelton, Mrs. Henry
Date: June 1950
The Genealogy of the John A. Kelly Family contains letters, family trees, and information concerning the capture of Fanny Kelly by the Sioux Indians. The Kelly Story (untitled) is not dated and the author is unknown. It tells of Fanny Kelly's life from the time her family left Kansas for Idaho in the summer of 1864. There is a detailed account of the attack on their wagon train; capture of Fanny Kelly, her niece Mary Kelly, Sarah Larimer and her son; killing of three men; Mary's death; and the wounding of Mr. Larimer. It tells of Fanny's nine months among the Sioux and her release at Fort Sully. Josiah and Fanny returned to Kansas where he later died of cholera. The story includes a dispute between Fanny Kelly and Sarah Laimer over a book written about the Indian attack. A court decided in Fanny's favor and her book was an immediate sensation. Later, she married William F. Gordon and lived in Washington, D.C. until her death on November 15, 1904.


Land patent transferring property from Benjamin Hendley Miller to Fannie [Fanny] Wiggins

Land patent transferring property from Benjamin Hendley Miller to Fannie [Fanny] Wiggins
Date: April 01, 1861
This is a land patent transferring property from Benjamin Hendley Miller to Fannie [Fanny] Wiggins. He received the land for his service in the United States Flotilla during the War of 1812. Miller received 159 acres in the northeast quarter of Section 6, Township 23, Range 18 in Anderson County, Kansas. Fannie [Fanny] Wiggins received the property on April 1, 1861. She married Josiah S. Kelly and settled near Geneva, Kansas. In 1864, the Kellys decided to move to Idaho. While on the trip, they encountered a band of Sioux. She was captured and several members of their party were killed; however, Josiah was able to escape. After nine months as a captive, she escaped. Fanny and Josiah returned to Kansas and started a hotel in Ellsworth. In 1867, Josiah contracted cholera and died. Later, she married William F. Gordon and lived in Washington, D.C. until her death on November 15, 1904.


Marriage certificate for William F. Gordon and Fanny Kelly

Marriage certificate for William F. Gordon and Fanny Kelly
Date: May 05, 1880
This is a marriage certificate issued to William F. Gordon and Fanny Kelly. In 1864, she and Josiah Kelly, her first husband, were traveling from Kansas to Idaho when they encountered a band of Sioux. She was captured and several members of their party were killed. Josiah was able to escape. After nine months as a captive, she escaped. Fanny and Josiah returned to Kansas and started a hotel in Ellsworth. In 1867, Josiah contracted cholera and died. Later, she married William F. Gordon and lived in Washington, D.C. until her death on November 15, 1904.


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