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Showing 1 - 14 of 14 (results per page: 10 | 25 | 50)


Frederick Funston

Frederick Funston
Date: Between 1913 and 1914
This studio portrait shows Frederick Funston, 1865-1917. He grew up in Iola, Kansas and becomes a prominent military leader in the United State Army. He enrolled and attended the University of Kansas from 1885 to 1888 but did not graduate. Instead of receiving a formal education, Funston receives an education in adventure by working for the Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe Railway Company and in 1890 working as a news reporter in Kansas City, Kansas. In the early 1890s he participates in scientific expeditions for the United States Department of Agriculture in the Dakota Badlands, Death Valley, and in Alaska along the Klondike and Yukon Rivers. Funston's need for adventure continues in 1896 when he signs up as a Cuban revolutionary to help forces who are fighting for independence from Spain. He serves eighteen months and is promoted captain of an artillery unit and the rank of a lieutenant colonel. Funston eventually returns to Kansas 1898 and continues to rise through the military ranks when Kansas Governor Leedy appoints Funston colonel of the 20th Kansas infantry which is sent to the Philippine Islands on November 30, 1898. For his effective leadership skills of the 20th Regiment, Funston is awarded the Congressional Medal of Honor and promoted to the rank of Brigadier General of volunteers. In June of 1901 he is given the rank as a Brigadier General in the regular army. Recognized as a national hero after the war, Funston is once again recognized for his leadership skills. During the 1906 earthquake in San Francisco, California, he keep law and order while providing relief to those who were suffering. After the earthquake Funston serves from mid 1908 to 1910, as Commandant of the Army Service Schools at Fort Leavenworth, Kansas. In 1914 he is in command of American troops along the Texas border during the difficulties with Pancho Villa. After the withdrawal of troops on November 17, 1914, Funston is promoted to the rank of Major General. His career as a military leader came to a close on February 19, 1917 when he collapses from a massive heart attack in the lobby of the St. Anthony Hotel in San Antonio, Texas.


Frederick Funston

Frederick Funston
Creator: Harris & Ewing
Date: 1908
This studio portrait shows Frederick Funston, 1865-1917. He grew up in Iola, Kansas and becomes a prominent military leader in the United State Army. He enrolled and attended the University of Kansas from 1885 to 1888 but did not graduate. Instead of receiving a formal education, Funston receives an education in adventure by working for the Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe Railway Company and in 1890 working as a news reporter in Kansas City, Kansas. In the early 1890s he participates in scientific expeditions for the United States Department of Agriculture in the Dakota Badlands, Death Valley, and in Alaska along the Klondike and Yukon Rivers. Funston's need for adventure continues in 1896 when he signs up as a Cuban revolutionary to help forces who are fighting for independence from Spain. He serves eighteen months and is promoted captain of an artillery unit and the rank of a lieutenant colonel. Funston eventually returns to Kansas 1898 and continues to rise through the military ranks when Kansas Governor Leedy appoints Funston colonel of the 20th Kansas infantry which is sent to the Philippine Islands on November 30, 1898. For his effective leadership skills of the 20th Regiment, Funston is awarded the Congressional Medal of Honor and promoted to the rank of Brigadier General of volunteers. In June of 1901 he is given the rank as a Brigadier General in the regular army. Recognized as a national hero after the war, Funston is once again recognized for his leadership skills. During the 1906 earthquake in San Francisco, California, he keep law and order while providing relief to those who were suffering. After the earthquake Funston serves from mid 1908 to 1910, as Commandant of the Army Service Schools at Fort Leavenworth, Kansas. In 1914 he is in command of American troops along the Texas border during the difficulties with Pancho Villa. After the withdrawal of troops on November 17, 1914, Funston is promoted to the rank of Major General. His career as a military leader came to a close on February 19, 1917 when he collapses from a massive heart attack in the lobby of the St. Anthony Hotel in San Antonio, Texas.


Frederick Funston

Frederick Funston
Date: between 1905 and 1908
This studio portrait shows Frederick Funston, 1865-1917. He grew up in Iola, Kansas and becomes a prominent military leader in the United State Army. He enrolled and attended the University of Kansas from 1885 to 1888 but did not graduate. Instead of receiving a formal education, Funston receives an education in adventure by working for the Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe Railway Company and in 1890 working as a news reporter in Kansas City, Kansas. In the early 1890s he participates in scientific expeditions for the United States Department of Agriculture in the Dakota Badlands, Death Valley, and in Alaska along the Klondike and Yukon Rivers. Funston's need for adventure continues in 1896 when he signs up as a Cuban revolutionary to help forces who are fighting for independence from Spain. He serves eighteen months and is promoted captain of an artillery unit and the rank of a lieutenant colonel. Funston eventually returns to Kansas 1898 and continues to rise through the military ranks when Kansas Governor Leedy appoints Funston colonel of the 20th Kansas infantry which is sent to the Philippine Islands on November 30, 1898. For his effective leadership skills of the 20th Regiment, Funston is awarded the Congressional Medal of Honor and promoted to the rank of Brigadier General of volunteers. In June of 1901 he is given the rank as a Brigadier General in the regular army. Recognized as a national hero after the war, Funston is once again recognized for his leadership skills. During the 1906 earthquake in San Francisco, California, he keep law and order while providing relief to those who were suffering. After the earthquake Funston serves from mid 1908 to 1910, as Commandant of the Army Service Schools at Fort Leavenworth, Kansas. In 1914 he is in command of American troops along the Texas border during the difficulties with Pancho Villa. After the withdrawal of troops on November 17, 1914, Funston is promoted to the rank of Major General. His career as a military leader came to a close on February 19, 1917 when he collapses from a massive heart attack in the lobby of the St. Anthony Hotel in San Antonio, Texas.


Frederick Funston

Frederick Funston
Date: between 1905 and 1908
This formal portrait shows Frederick Funston, 1865-1917. He grew up in Iola, Kansas and becomes a prominent military leader in the United State Army. He enrolled and attended the University of Kansas from 1885 to 1888 but did not graduate. Instead of receiving a formal education, Funston receives an education in adventure by working for the Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe Railway Company and in 1890 working as a news reporter in Kansas City, Kansas. In the early 1890s he participates in scientific expeditions for the United States Department of Agriculture in the Dakota Badlands, Death Valley, and in Alaska along the Klondike and Yukon Rivers. Funston's need for adventure continues in 1896 when he signs up as a Cuban revolutionary to help forces who are fighting for independence from Spain. He serves eighteen months and is promoted captain of an artillery unit and the rank of a lieutenant colonel. Funston eventually returns to Kansas 1898 and continues to rise through the military ranks when Kansas Governor Leedy appoints Funston colonel of the 20th Kansas infantry which is sent to the Philippine Islands on November 30, 1898. For his effective leadership skills of the 20th Regiment, Funston is awarded the Congressional Medal of Honor and promoted to the rank of Brigadier General of volunteers. In June of 1901 he is given the rank as a Brigadier General in the regular army. Recognized as a national hero after the war, Funston is once again recognized for his leadership skills. During the 1906 earthquake in San Francisco, California, he keep law and order while providing relief to those who were suffering. After the earthquake Funston serves from mid 1908 to 1910, as Commandant of the Army Service Schools at Fort Leavenworth, Kansas. In 1914 he is in command of American troops along the Texas border during the difficulties with Pancho Villa. After the withdrawal of troops on November 17, 1914, Funston is promoted to the rank of Major General. His career as a military leader came to a close on February 19, 1917 when he collapses from a massive heart attack in the lobby of the St. Anthony Hotel in San Antonio, Texas.


Frederick Funston

Frederick Funston
Date: between 1905 and 1908
This studio portrait shows Frederick Funston, 1865-1917. He grew up in Iola, Kansas and becomes a prominent military leader in the United State Army. He enrolled and attended the University of Kansas from 1885 to 1888 but did not graduate. Instead of receiving a formal education, Funston receives an education in adventure by working for the Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe Railway Company and in 1890 working as a news reporter in Kansas City, Kansas. In the early 1890s he participates in scientific expeditions for the United States Department of Agriculture in the Dakota Badlands, Death Valley, and in Alaska along the Klondike and Yukon Rivers. Funston's need for adventure continues in 1896 when he signs up as a Cuban revolutionary to help forces who are fighting for independence from Spain. He serves eighteen months and is promoted captain of an artillery unit and the rank of a lieutenant colonel. Funston eventually returns to Kansas 1898 and continues to rise through the military ranks when Kansas Governor Leedy appoints Funston colonel of the 20th Kansas infantry which is sent to the Philippine Islands on November 30, 1898. For his effective leadership skills of the 20th Regiment, Funston is awarded the Congressional Medal of Honor and promoted to the rank of Brigadier General of volunteers. In June of 1901 he is given the rank as a Brigadier General in the regular army. Recognized as a national hero after the war, Funston is once again recognized for his leadership skills. During the 1906 earthquake in San Francisco, California, he keep law and order while providing relief to those who were suffering. After the earthquake Funston serves from mid 1908 to 1910, as Commandant of the Army Service Schools at Fort Leavenworth, Kansas. In 1914 he is in command of American troops along the Texas border during the difficulties with Pancho Villa. After the withdrawal of troops on November 17, 1914, Funston is promoted to the rank of Major General. His career as a military leader came to a close on February 19, 1917 when he collapses from a massive heart attack in the lobby of the St. Anthony Hotel in San Antonio, Texas.


Frederick Funston

Frederick Funston
Date: 1883
This studio portrait shows Frederick Funston, 1865-1917. He grew up in Iola, Kansas and becomes a prominent military leader in the United State Army. He enrolled and attended the University of Kansas from 1885 to 1888 but did not graduate. Instead of receiving a formal education, Funston receives an education in adventure by working for the Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe Railway Company and in 1890 working as a news reporter in Kansas City, Kansas. In the early 1890s he participates in scientific expeditions for the United States Department of Agriculture in the Dakota Badlands, Death Valley, and in Alaska along the Klondike and Yukon Rivers. Funston's need for adventure continues in 1896 when he signs up as a Cuban revolutionary to help forces who are fighting for independence from Spain. He serves eighteen months and is promoted captain of an artillery unit and the rank of a lieutenant colonel. Funston eventually returns to Kansas 1898 and continues to rise through the military ranks when Kansas Governor Leedy appoints Funston colonel of the 20th Kansas infantry which is sent to the Philippine Islands on November 30, 1898. For his effective leadership skills of the 20th Regiment, Funston is awarded the Congressional Medal of Honor and promoted to the rank of Brigadier General of volunteers. In June of 1901 he is given the rank as a Brigadier General in the regular army. Recognized as a national hero after the war, Funston is once again recognized for his leadership skills. During the 1906 earthquake in San Francisco, California, he keep law and order while providing relief to those who were suffering. After the earthquake Funston serves from mid 1908 to 1910, as Commandant of the Army Service Schools at Fort Leavenworth, Kansas. In 1914 he is in command of American troops along the Texas border during the difficulties with Pancho Villa. After the withdrawal of troops on November 17, 1914, Funston is promoted to the rank of Major General. His career as a military leader came to a close on February 19, 1917 when he collapses from a massive heart attack in the lobby of the St. Anthony Hotel in San Antonio, Texas.


Frederick Funston

Frederick Funston
Creator: Mettner's Studio, Lawrence, Kansas
Date: 1883
This studio portrait shows Frederick Funston, 1865-1917, as an 18 year old student. He grew up in Iola, Kansas and becomes a prominent military leader in the United State Army. He enrolled and attended the University of Kansas from 1885 to 1888 but did not graduate. Instead of receiving a formal education, Funston receives an education in adventure by working for the Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe Railway Company and in 1890 working as a news reporter in Kansas City, Kansas. In the early 1890s he participates in scientific expeditions for the United States Department of Agriculture in the Dakota Badlands, Death Valley, and in Alaska along the Klondike and Yukon Rivers. Funston's need for adventure continues in 1896 when he signs up as a Cuban revolutionary to help forces who are fighting for independence from Spain. He serves eighteen months and is promoted captain of an artillery unit and the rank of a lieutenant colonel. Funston eventually returns to Kansas 1898 and continues to rise through the military ranks when Kansas Governor Leedy appoints Funston colonel of the 20th Kansas infantry which is sent to the Philippine Islands on November 30, 1898. For his effective leadership skills of the 20th Regiment, Funston is awarded the Congressional Medal of Honor and promoted to the rank of Brigadier General of volunteers. In June of 1901 he is given the rank as a Brigadier General in the regular army. Recognized as a national hero after the war, Funston is once again recognized for his leadership skills. During the 1906 earthquake in San Francisco, California, he keep law and order while providing relief to those who were suffering. After the earthquake Funston serves from mid 1908 to 1910, as Commandant of the Army Service Schools at Fort Leavenworth, Kansas. In 1914 he is in command of American troops along the Texas border during the difficulties with Pancho Villa. After the withdrawal of troops on November 17, 1914, Funston is promoted to the rank of Major General. His career as a military leader came to a close on February 19, 1917 when he collapses from a massive heart attack in the lobby of the St. Anthony Hotel in San Antonio, Texas.


Frederick Funston

Frederick Funston
Date: Between 1892 and 1894
This photograph shows Frederick Funston, 1865-1917, dressed in Eskimo clothing during his scientific exploration in Alaska for the United States Department of Agriculture.


Frederick Funston

Frederick Funston
Date: Between 1899 and 1917
This studio portrait shows Frederick Funston, 1865-1917. He grew up in Iola, Kansas and becomes a prominent military leader in the United State Army. He enrolled and attended the University of Kansas from 1885 to 1888 but did not graduate. Instead of receiving a formal education, Funston receives an education in adventure by working for the Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe Railway Company and in 1890 working as a news reporter in Kansas City, Kansas. In the early 1890s he participates in scientific expeditions for the United States Department of Agriculture in the Dakota Badlands, Death Valley, and in Alaska along the Klondike and Yukon Rivers. Funston's need for adventure continues in 1896 when he signs up as a Cuban revolutionary to help forces who are fighting for independence from Spain. He serves eighteen months and is promoted captain of an artillery unit and the rank of a lieutenant colonel. Funston eventually returns to Kansas 1898 and continues to rise through the military ranks when Kansas Governor Leedy appoints Funston colonel of the 20th Kansas infantry which is sent to the Philippine Islands on November 30, 1898. For his effective leadership skills of the 20th Regiment, Funston is awarded the Congressional Medal of Honor and promoted to the rank of Brigadier General of volunteers. In June of 1901 he is given the rank as a Brigadier General in the regular army. Recognized as a national hero after the war, Funston is once again recognized for his leadership skills. During the 1906 earthquake in San Francisco, California, he keep law and order while providing relief to those who were suffering. After the earthquake Funston serves from mid 1908 to 1910, as Commandant of the Army Service Schools at Fort Leavenworth, Kansas. In 1914 he is in command of American troops along the Texas border during the difficulties with Pancho Villa. After the withdrawal of troops on November 17, 1914, Funston is promoted to the rank of Major General. His career as a military leader came to a close on February 19, 1917 when he collapses from a massive heart attack in the lobby of the St. Anthony Hotel in San Antonio, Texas.


Frederick Funston

Frederick Funston
Creator: Miller, Grant H.
Date: Between January 01, 1898 and February 20, 1917
This studio portrait shows Frederick Funston, 1865-1917, dressed in his 20th Kansas Volunteer uniform. He grew up in Iola, Kansas and becomes a prominent military leader in the United State Army. He enrolled and attended the University of Kansas from 1885 to 1888 but did not graduate. Instead of receiving a formal education, Funston receives an education in adventure by working for the Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe Railway Company and in 1890 working as a news reporter in Kansas City, Kansas. In the early 1890s he participates in scientific expeditions for the United States Department of Agriculture in the Dakota Badlands, Death Valley, and in Alaska along the Klondike and Yukon Rivers. Funston's need for adventure continues in 1896 when he signs up as a Cuban revolutionary to help forces who are fighting for independence from Spain. He serves eighteen months and is promoted captain of an artillery unit and the rank of a lieutenant colonel. Funston eventually returns to Kansas 1898 and continues to rise through the military ranks when Kansas Governor Leedy appoints Funston colonel of the 20th Kansas infantry which is sent to the Philippine Islands on November 30, 1898. For his effective leadership skills of the 20th Regiment, Funston is awarded the Congressional Medal of Honor and promoted to the rank of Brigadier General of volunteers. In June of 1901 he is given the rank as a Brigadier General in the regular army. Recognized as a national hero after the war, Funston is once again recognized for his leadership skills. During the 1906 earthquake in San Francisco, California, he keep law and order while providing relief to those who were suffering. After the earthquake Funston serves from mid 1908 to 1910, as Commandant of the Army Service Schools at Fort Leavenworth, Kansas. In 1914 he is in command of American troops along the Texas border during the difficulties with Pancho Villa. After the withdrawal of troops on November 17, 1914, Funston is promoted to the rank of Major General. His career as a military leader came to a close on February 19, 1917 when he collapses from a massive heart attack in the lobby of the St. Anthony Hotel in San Antonio, Texas.


Frederick Funston

Frederick Funston
Date: Between 1898 and 1917
This informal portrait shows Colonel Frederick Funston, 1865-1917, dressed in his 20th Kansas Volunteer uniform. He grew up in Iola, Kansas and becomes a prominent military leader in the United State Army. He enrolled and attended the University of Kansas from 1885 to 1888 but did not graduate. Instead of receiving a formal education, Funston receives an education in adventure by working for the Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe Railway Company and in 1890 working as a news reporter in Kansas City, Kansas. In the early 1890s he participates in scientific expeditions for the United States Department of Agriculture in the Dakota Badlands, Death Valley, and in Alaska along the Klondike and Yukon Rivers. Funston's need for adventure continues in 1896 when he signs up as a Cuban revolutionary to help forces who are fighting for independence from Spain. He serves eighteen months and is promoted captain of an artillery unit and the rank of a lieutenant colonel. Funston eventually returns to Kansas 1898 and continues to rise through the military ranks when Kansas Governor Leedy appoints Funston colonel of the 20th Kansas infantry which is sent to the Philippine Islands on November 30, 1898. For his effective leadership skills of the 20th Regiment, Funston is awarded the Congressional Medal of Honor and promoted to the rank of Brigadier General of volunteers. In June of 1901 he is given the rank as a Brigadier General in the regular army. Recognized as a national hero after the war, Funston is once again recognized for his leadership skills. During the 1906 earthquake in San Francisco, California, he keep law and order while providing relief to those who were suffering. After the earthquake Funston serves from mid 1908 to 1910, as Commandant of the Army Service Schools at Fort Leavenworth, Kansas. In 1914 he is in command of American troops along the Texas border during the difficulties with Pancho Villa. After the withdrawal of troops on November 17, 1914, Funston is promoted to the rank of Major General. His career as a military leader came to a close on February 19, 1917 when he collapses from a massive heart attack in the lobby of the St. Anthony Hotel in San Antonio, Texas.


Frederick Funston

Frederick Funston
Date: Between January 01, 1875 and December 31, 1885
This studio portrait shows Frederick Funston, 1865-1917 as a young man. He grew up in Iola, Kansas and becomes a prominent military leader in the United State Army. He enrolled and attended the University of Kansas from 1885 to 1888 but did not graduate. Instead of receiving a formal education, Funston receives an education in adventure by working for the Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe Railway Company and in 1890 working as a news reporter in Kansas City, Kansas. In the early 1890s he participates in scientific expeditions for the United States Department of Agriculture in the Dakota Badlands, Death Valley, and in Alaska along the Klondike and Yukon Rivers. Funston's need for adventure continues in 1896 when he signs up as a Cuban revolutionary to help forces who are fighting for independence from Spain. He serves eighteen months and is promoted captain of an artillery unit and the rank of a lieutenant colonel. Funston eventually returns to Kansas 1898 and continues to rise through the military ranks when Kansas Governor Leedy appoints Funston colonel of the 20th Kansas infantry which is sent to the Philippine Islands on November 30, 1898. For his effective leadership skills of the 20th Regiment, Funston is awarded the Congressional Medal of Honor and promoted to the rank of Brigadier General of volunteers. In June of 1901 he is given the rank as a Brigadier General in the regular army. Recognized as a national hero after the war, Funston is once again recognized for his leadership skills. During the 1906 earthquake in San Francisco, California, he keep law and order while providing relief to those who were suffering. After the earthquake Funston serves from mid 1908 to 1910, as Commandant of the Army Service Schools at Fort Leavenworth, Kansas. In 1914 he is in command of American troops along the Texas border during the difficulties with Pancho Villa. After the withdrawal of troops on November 17, 1914, Funston is promoted to the rank of Major General. His career as a military leader came to a close on February 19, 1917 when he collapses from a massive heart attack in the lobby of the St. Anthony Hotel in San Antonio, Texas.


Frederick Funston

Frederick Funston
Date: Bewteen 1865 to 1869
This studio portrait shows Frederick Funston, 1865-1917 as a toddler. He grew up in Iola, Kansas and becomes a prominent military leader in the United State Army. He enrolled and attended the University of Kansas from 1885 to 1888 but did not graduate. Instead of receiving a formal education, Funston receives an education in adventure by working for the Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe Railway Company and in 1890 working as a news reporter in Kansas City, Kansas. In the early 1890s he participates in scientific expeditions for the United States Department of Agriculture in the Dakota Badlands, Death Valley, and in Alaska along the Klondike and Yukon Rivers. Funston's need for adventure continues in 1896 when he signs up as a Cuban revolutionary to help forces who are fighting for independence from Spain. He serves eighteen months and is promoted captain of an artillery unit and the rank of a lieutenant colonel. Funston eventually returns to Kansas 1898 and continues to rise through the military ranks when Kansas Governor Leedy appoints Funston colonel of the 20th Kansas infantry which is sent to the Philippine Islands on November 30, 1898. For his effective leadership skills of the 20th Regiment, Funston is awarded the Congressional Medal of Honor and promoted to the rank of Brigadier General of volunteers. In June of 1901 he is given the rank as a Brigadier General in the regular army. Recognized as a national hero after the war, Funston is once again recognized for his leadership skills. During the 1906 earthquake in San Francisco, California, he keep law and order while providing relief to those who were suffering. After the earthquake Funston serves from mid 1908 to 1910, as Commandant of the Army Service Schools at Fort Leavenworth, Kansas. In 1914 he is in command of American troops along the Texas border during the difficulties with Pancho Villa. After the withdrawal of troops on November 17, 1914, Funston is promoted to the rank of Major General. His career as a military leader came to a close on February 19, 1917 when he collapses from a massive heart attack in the lobby of the St. Anthony Hotel in San Antonio, Texas.


William Claire Menninger, Edwin Arnold Menninger, Karl Augustus Menninger and Charles Fredrick Menninger

William Claire Menninger, Edwin Arnold Menninger, Karl Augustus Menninger and Charles Fredrick Menninger
Date: 1935
This is a photograph of brothers (left to right) William Claire Menninger, Edwin Arnold Menninger, Karl Augustus Menninger and their father Charles Fredrick Menninger. With the help of his sons, C. F. Menninger started the Menninger Clinic in Topeka, Kansas. The programs they started continued to expand under the umbrella of the Menninger Foundation, a non-profit center, which supported a variety of treatment, prevention, training, research, and publications. In 2003, the Menninger Foundation partnered with the Baylor College of Medicine and relocated to Houston, Texas. The archives of the Menninger Foundation while it was located in Topeka, Kansas, is now housed at the Kansas Historical Society.


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