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In re Walter McGee, George Andrews, and George Buckner, petitioners, Kansas Supreme Court case no. 22,691

In re Walter McGee, George Andrews, and George Buckner, petitioners, Kansas Supreme Court case no. 22,691
Creator: Kansas. Supreme Court
Date: July term 1919
Kansas Supreme Court case no. 22,691, In re Walter McGee, George Andrews, and George Buckner, petitioners, was a challenge to Chapter 205 of the Kansas Laws of 1917. The law permitted the State Board of Health to enact a policy of quarantining men (and women), without a hearing, for the purpose of controlling the spread of venereal diseases. The Kansas State Quarantine Camp for Men, at the State Penitentiary in Lansing, was the place designated for isolating and treating the men, who were taken into custody in Topeka after being examined by the City Health Officer. Topeka passed its own version of the state law, ordinance no. 4832, in 1918, and copies of the ordinance are included in this file. The Kansas Supreme Court denied the petitioners' "application for a writ of habeas corpus" (claim that the state had detained them unlawfully) stating that the State Board of Health's actions were not unreasonable. The attorney representing the petitioners was Elisha Scott, a prominent African American attorney, whose firm later handled the Brown v. Topeka Board of Education case.


Jones v. McProud appellate court case

Jones v. McProud appellate court case
Creator: Kansas Supreme Court
Date: 1900
This case file includes but not limited to briefs, mandates, court orders, appellee's petition for reviews, correspondence and case briefs from the appellant's previous trial in question. Case number 11921 is by the applicants Gracie Jones, Mabel Jones and their next friend and father, George W. Jones versus Principal B.E. McProud of the School in District No. 29. The case file was scanned in existing order.


Mary Page Wright v. Julius H. Noell

Mary Page Wright v. Julius H. Noell
Creator: Kansas. Supreme Court
Date: 1876
The Kansas Supreme Court case file of Mary Page Wright vs. Julius H. Noell. Noell contested the election of Wright to the office of Superintendent of Public Instruction in Coffey County, Kansas. The opinion of the court ruled that women are eligible to hold public office because "there is not only no express, constitutional disqualification of females, and no affirmative statement of qualifications which would exclude them; but there is nothing in the language of the section creating the office, nor in the duties imposed by law upon the officer, which would imply the necessary or intended exclusion of either sex." A searchable transcription of the published report is available by clicking "Text Version" below.


State of Kansas vs. Knights of the Ku Klux Klan

State of Kansas vs. Knights of the Ku Klux Klan
Creator: Kansas Supreme Court
Date: 1922-1927
Kansas Supreme Court case number 24.729 demonstrates how the State of Kansas as the plaintiff was represented by Charles B. Griffith attempted to eliminate the Ku Klux Klan as the defendant from Kansas. The State of Kansas claimed the Klan was a foreign corporation doing business in the state without permission under Kansas foreign corporation laws and was therefore breaking state law.


William Reynolds vs. The Board of Education of the City of Topeka, depositions

William Reynolds vs. The Board of Education of the City of Topeka, depositions
Creator: Kansas Supreme Court
Date: 1902-1905
These set of records are depositions related to the William Reynolds v. Board of Education of the City of Topeka Kansas Supreme Court Case. William Reynolds, the plaintiff, was a resident of Lowman Hill school district and the father of Raoul Reynolds, an eight-year-old student who had attended a desegregated school in the district until the building was destroyed by fire. A new and modern brick building, Lowman School, was constructed; however, it was designated for white students and black students were forced to attend an older and undesirable building, Douglass School. In February 1902, William Reynolds brought his son to Lowman School for enrollment, but the principal refused because the child was of African descent. Mr. Reynolds was directed to enroll his son in Douglass School designated for black students. The plaintiff accused the Board of Education of violating the Constitution of the State of Kansas and the Fourteenth Amendment to the Constitution of the United States. Reynolds demanded that his son be admitted to Lowman School, to be taught without regard to his race or color, and to be treated in all respects as a white child.


William Reynolds vs. The Board of Education of the City of Topeka, depositions

William Reynolds vs. The Board of Education of the City of Topeka, depositions
Creator: Kansas Supreme Court
Date: 1902-1905
These set of records are depositions related to the William Reynolds v. Board of Education of the City of Topeka Kansas Supreme Court Case. William Reynolds, the plaintiff, was a resident of Lowman Hill school district and the father of Raoul Reynolds, an eight-year-old student who had attended a desegregated school in the district until the building was destroyed by fire. A new and modern brick building, Lowman School, was constructed; however, it was designated for white students and black students were forced to attend an older and undesirable building, Douglass School. In February 1902, William Reynolds brought his son to Lowman School for enrollment, but the principal refused because the child was of African descent. Mr. Reynolds was directed to enroll his son in Douglass School designated for black students. The plaintiff accused the Board of Education of violating the Constitution of the State of Kansas and the Fourteenth Amendment to the Constitution of the United States. Reynolds demanded that his son be admitted to Lowman School, to be taught without regard to his race or color, and to be treated in all respects as a white child.


William Reynolds vs. The Board of Education of the City of Topeka, proceedings in mandamus

William Reynolds vs. The Board of Education of the City of Topeka, proceedings in mandamus
Creator: Kansas Supreme Court
Date: 1902-1904
These records are proceedings in mandamus related to the William Reynolds v. Board of Education of the City of Topeka Kansas Supreme Court Case. William Reynolds, the plaintiff, was a resident of Lowman Hill school district and the father of Raoul Reynolds, an eight-year-old student who had attended a desegregated school in the district until the building was destroyed by fire. A new and modern brick building, Lowman School, was constructed; however, it was designated for white students and black students were forced to attend an older and undesirable building, Douglass School. In February 1902, William Reynolds brought his son to Lowman School for enrollment, but the principal refused because the child was of African descent. Mr. Reynolds was directed to enroll his son in Douglass School designated for black students. The plaintiff accused the Board of Education of violating the Constitution of the State of Kansas and the Fourteenth Amendment to the Constitution of the United States. Reynolds demanded that his son be admitted to Lowman School, to be taught without regard to his race or color, and to be treated in all respects as a white child


William Reynolds vs. The Board of Education of the City of Topeka, stipulation

William Reynolds vs. The Board of Education of the City of Topeka, stipulation
Creator: Kansas Supreme Court
Date: 1902
These set of records are stipulations related to the William Reynolds v. Board of Education of the City of Topeka Kansas Supreme Court Case. William Reynolds, the plaintiff, was a resident of Lowman Hill school district and the father of Raoul Reynolds, an eight-year-old student who had attended a desegregated school in the district until the building was destroyed by fire. A new and modern brick building, Lowman School, was constructed; however, it was designated for white students and black students were forced to attend an older and undesirable building, Douglass School. In February 1902, William Reynolds brought his son to Lowman School for enrollment, but the principal refused because the child was of African descent. Mr. Reynolds was directed to enroll his son in Douglass School designated for black students. The plaintiff accused the Board of Education of violating the Constitution of the State of Kansas and the Fourteenth Amendment to the Constitution of the United States. Reynolds demanded that his son be admitted to Lowman School, to be taught without regard to his race or color, and to be treated in all respects as a white child.


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