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Anti-Saloon League materials

Anti-Saloon League materials
Date: 1920
This correspondence and financial documents are from the records of the Anti-Saloon League of Kansas, including mass mailings from Treasurer J. C. Mohler saying "we have just closed perhaps the most remarkable year in the history of the Prohibition Movement." Mohler solicited financial subscriptions to aid missionaries around the world and to uphold the National Prohibition Act, also known as the Volstead Act. There is also correspondence from W. J. Herwig, superintendent, of the Kansas Department, The Anti-Saloon League of America.


Anti-Saloon League materials

Anti-Saloon League materials
Date: 1917
These materials relate to the Kansas Department of the Anti-Saloon League of America. Correspondence is primarily between State Superintendent W.J. Herwig and Reverend Milo G. Kelser, field manager at the Anti-Saloon League of America headquarters in Westerville, Ohio. Correspondence is also exchanged with Reverend Julius Smith and Professor O. G. Markham of Baldwin City. Travel itineraries, legislation, and the effects of World War I are frequent topics of conversation. The group sought to organize prohibition meetings in conjunction with Sunday church services around the state. Monthly financial reports are also included.


Anti-Saloon League materials

Anti-Saloon League materials
Date: 1918
This correspondence and financial documents are from the records of the Anti-Saloon League of Kansas. The majority of the letters are exchanged between Milo G. Kelser, field manager for the Anti-Saloon League of America located in Westerville, Ohio, and Rev. W. H. Herwig, superintendent of the Anti-Saloon League of Kansas. Other correspondents include Boyd P. Doty, assistant financial secretary for the Anti-Saloon League of America, H. T. Laughbaum, superintendent of the Anti-Saloon League of America, and Miss Nettie F. Corning, secretary for the Anti-Saloon League of Kansas.


Anti-Saloon League materials

Anti-Saloon League materials
Date: 1919
This correspondence and financial documents are from the records of the Anti-Saloon League of Kansas. The majority of the letters are exchanged between Milo G. Kelser, field manager for the Anti-Saloon League of America located in Westerville, Ohio, and Rev. W. H. Herwig, superintendent of the Anti-Saloon League of Kansas. Letters are also exchanged with Boyd P. Doty, assistant financial secretary for the Anti-Saloon League of America and assistant general manager of the American Issue Publishing Company, publishers for the Anti-Saloon League of America.


City Liquor Ordinance

City Liquor Ordinance
Creator: Kansas State Temperance Union
Date: Unknown
A city liquor ordinance comprised of 14 sections making it "unlawful for any person to sell or barter any spirituous, mault, vinous, fermented or other intoxicating liquor." This copy is written for Saline County but was most likely used as a template for prohibition across the state of Kansas.


Kansas State Temperance Union expense journals

Kansas State Temperance Union expense journals
Creator: Kansas State Temperance Union
Date: 1898-1911
This collection consists of 7 volumes of records from the Kansas State Temperance Union. The first volume lists the members and the dues they paid by local organization. The index lists the communities that have members listed and these communities have been included in the categories. Note: other communities are listed elsewhere in the records, particularly the speaker expenses volume. The second volume is the cash book (expense journal) for the years 1901-1904. Volumes three through five are the cash books for 1907-1910, 1909-1910, and 1910-1911. Volume 6 contains speaker expenses and contribution from the communities where they spoke, listed by name of speaker. Several speakers are listed. Volume 7 is an expense journal for 1907-1911. There are also some loose papers inserted into the volumes, mostly correspondence and form letters.


Kansas State Temperance Union legal documents

Kansas State Temperance Union legal documents
Date: 1907-1908
This bound volume contains affidavits, warrants, and legal briefs naming the State of Kansas as plaintiff for cases pertaining to the sale of alcohol. The Kansas State Temperance Union actively prosecuted the "unlawful and illegal sales of intoxicating liquors." Although Kansas was the first state to adopt a constitutional amendment prohibiting the sale of intoxicating liquors, the law was largely unenforced. This volume includes accusations that Daniel Read Anthony, Jr. knowingly allowed the sale of alcohol to occur on his property. Kansas Attorney General F. S. Jackson is frequently mentioned throughout the volume. Due to water damage, some text is illegible or difficult to read.


Kansas State Temperance Union minutes

Kansas State Temperance Union minutes
Creator: Kansas State Temperance Union
Date: 1883-1898
This bound volume contains the meeting minutes of the Kansas State Temperance Union beginning with the annual convention on January 9, 1883, in Topeka. Executive meeting minutes, committee appointments, resolutions, and reports from secretary Frederick Oliver Popenoe are also included. Clippings of printed material and newspapers have been pasted onto several pages.


Kansas State Temperance Union receipts and disbursements

Kansas State Temperance Union receipts and disbursements
Creator: Kansas State Temperance Union
Date: 1906
Listing of receipts and disbursements of the Kansas State Temperance Union, divided by month and signed by financial manager S. H. Pitcher. Expenses include salaries, rent, postage, stationary, and lecturers.


Minutes of the McPherson Chapter of the Woman's Christian Temperance Union

Minutes of the McPherson Chapter of the Woman's Christian Temperance Union
Date: 1891-1896
This minute book of the McPherson County Chapter of the Woman's Christian Temperance Union begins with the first meeting recorded on October 28, 1891. The group regularly recorded meetings through August 28, 1896. The book includes submitted resolutions with supporting signatures, commendations, and newspaper clippings. The meeting minutes were recorded by secretaries Myrta M. Jones, Della Dick, and Kate Benjamin. Mrs. Eliza Rouze was elected chapter president. Several pages have been cut out of the book, including pages 9-14, 19-22, 27-28, and 93-96.


Temperance history correspondence

Temperance history correspondence
Date: 1905
Correspondence sent and received by members of the Kansas State Temperance Union, primarily Rev. W. L. Dexter, secretary, Robert Norris, secretary, Julian K. Codding, lawyer, and William T. Jones, solicitor. Correspondents include Elizabeth P. Hutchinson, president of the Woman's Christian Temperance Union, Rev. Purley A. Baker, superintendent of the American Anti-Saloon League, Mary Evelyn Dobbs, Rev. Charles W. Whorrall, and William H. McCamish, assistant attorney general of Wyandotte County. Included in this correspondence are several signed petitions to members of the U.S. Senate from citizens in Arkansas City, Kirwin, and Abilene asking them to vote against the Hamilton Bill which they argue "would annul the solemn pledge of the Government to protect the Indians against the introduction and sale of intoxicants in the Indian territory." Some financial records are also included, such as a report from the finance committee for the previous year, ending February 15, 1905, and receipts and disbursements by month, signed by financial manager S. H. Pitcher. Although Kansas was the first state to adopt a constitutional amendment prohibiting the sale of intoxicating liquors in 1880, the law was largely unenforced.


Temperance history correspondence

Temperance history correspondence
Date: 1908
Correspondence sent and received by the Kansas State Temperance Union (KSTU). Rev. Robert Norris acted as secretary, John Marshall, attorney, and Julian K. Codding, attorney and later president of the Kansas State Temperance Union. Correspondents include Elizabeth P. Hutchinson, president of the Kansas Woman's Christian Temperance Union, Rev. J.M. Dunlavy, superintendent of the Third Congressional District of the KSTU, Rev. J.W. Primrose, superintendent of the Second Congressional District of the KSTU, Mary Evelyn Dobbs, president of the Third District of the Kansas Woman's Christian Temperance Union, the Kansas State Prohibition Committee, and representatives from the Anti-Saloon League of America. Much of the correspondence concerns efforts to advance anti-liquor agendas in local, state, and national politics. Although Kansas was the first state to adopt a constitutional amendment prohibiting the sale of intoxicating liquors in 1880, the law was largely unenforced.


Temperance history correspondence

Temperance history correspondence
Date: 1910
Correspondence sent and received by members of the Kansas State Temperance Union, including President Foster Dwight Coburn and Superintendent Frank M. Stahl. Correspondents include Mary Evelyn Dobbs, corresponding secretary for the Kansas Woman's Christian Temperance Union, Julian K. Codding, warden of the Kansas State Penitentiary, and representatives of the Anti-Saloon League of America. Much of the correspondence concerns efforts to advance anti-liquor agendas in local, state, and national politics. Although Kansas was the first state to adopt a constitutional amendment prohibiting the sale of intoxicating liquors in 1880, the law was largely unenforced.


Temperance history correspondence

Temperance history correspondence
Date: 1903-1904
This correspondence was sent and received by Kansas State Temperance Union secretaries Rev. J. E. Everett and Rev. W. L. Dexter. Correspondents include Howard H. Russell, Superintendent of the American Anti-Saloon League, Rev. H. W. Chaffee and Rev. C. S. Nusbaum of the Ottawa Chautauqua Assembly, Harry A. Caton, Mayor of Winfield, Woman's Christian Temperance Union representatives from several states, and several members of Congress. Included are subscription lists with members' names from several counties including Brown, Butler, Jackson, Nemaha, Pottawatomie, and Reno. Much of the correspondence concerns efforts to advance anti-liquor agendas in local, state, and national politics. Although Kansas was the first state to adopt a constitutional amendment prohibiting the sale of intoxicating liquors in 1880, the law was largely unenforced.


Temperance history correspondence

Temperance history correspondence
Date: 1907
Correspondence sent and received by Rev. Robert Norris, secretary of the Kansas State Temperance Union, and Julian K. Codding, attorney for the Kansas State Temperance Union. Correspondents include Elizabeth P. Hutchinson and Minnie Wood, presidents of the Kansas Woman's Christian Temperance Union, Rev. J. M. Dunlavy, president of the Crawford County Civil League and Third Congressional District of the KSTU, Rev. J. W. Primrose, superintendent of the Second Congressional District of the KSTU in Fort Scott, John Wiswell, chairman of the Cherokee County Law Enforcement Aid Committee, and representatives from the Anti-Saloon League of America. Much of the correspondence concerns efforts to advance anti-liquor agendas in local, state, and national politics. Although Kansas was the first state to adopt a constitutional amendment prohibiting the sale of intoxicating liquors in 1880, the law was largely unenforced.


Temperance history correspondence

Temperance history correspondence
Date: 1911-1912
This correspondence was sent and received by Frank M. Stahl, superintendent of the Kansas State Temperance Union. A letter from James K. Shields, state superintendent for the Anti-Saloon League of Illinois, asks for Stahl's assistance in recruiting Governor Walter R. Stubbs for a temperance rally in Springfield, Illinois, in opposition to the "United Societies boozers of Chicago." A letter from J. F. Baker, legislative superintendent for the Wisconsin Anti-Saloon League seeks information about prohibitory zones around Kansas universities as the state of Wisconsin attempts to exclude saloons from the college town of Madison. Correspondence with W. H. Edmundson and E. D. Mikesell, attorneys in Fredonia, regards the selling and prosecution of "Belgian Beer" which supposedly contained one-half of one percent of alcohol and was sold by children at lemonade stands. Stahl responded that "the internal revenue collectors have rather overstepped their duties." Although Kansas was the first state to adopt a constitutional amendment prohibiting the sale of intoxicating liquors in 1880, the law was largely unenforced.


Temperance history correspondence

Temperance history correspondence
Date: 1909
Correspondence relating to the Kansas State Temperance Union and its activities promoting the enforcement of prohibition in the state of Kansas. Frank M. Stahl served as superintendent and John Marshall served as attorney. They wrote a number of the letters contained in this collection. Leaders of the temperance movement frequently corresponded with county attorneys, civic leaders, ministers, and pastors. Included are several letters supporting James A. Lyons of Langdon, Kansas, who was charged with selling intoxicating liquors, and a circular announcing the guilty verdict in the case of Assistant Attorney General C. W. Trickett of Wyandotte County, Kansas, who accepted illegal fees in the prosecution of liquor cases. The collection contains correspondence from numerous Kansas communities.


Temperance history correspondence

Temperance history correspondence
Date: 1858-1902, bulk 1900-1902
This correspondence was sent and received by Kansas State Temperance Union secretaries T.E. Stephens, A.D. Wilcox, and J.E. Everett. Each exchanged letters with religious leaders across the state, including Rev. H.G. Fraser from Ottawa, Rev. C.C. Brown of Tonganoxie, Rev. J.M. Leonard of Iola, Rev. R.A. Bolton of Junction City, Rev. James Kerr of Scandia, Rev. J.K. Miller of Manhattan, Rev. A.W. Cummings of Canton, Rev. John A. Holmes of Harper, Rev. W.H. Eaton of Cherryvale, Rev. H.H. Bowen of Glen Elder, and Rev. Fred Grey of Alton. Organizations involved in the temperance movement include the Kansas State Temperance Union (KSTU), the Twentieth Century Total Abstinence Union (TCTAU), the Anti-Cigarette League, the American Anti-Saloon League (AASL), the Women's Christian Temperance Union (WCTU) and others. This collection also includes local subscription lists for those supporting the Kansas State Temperance Union in Phillipsburg, Lakin, LeRoy, Cimarron, Dodge City, Liberal, Greensburg, Cunningham, Sedgwick, Mount Hope and Colwich. Other correspondents include attorney John Wiswell in Columbus, Elmer Lawrence, publisher of The Sunbeam, a weekly Christian journal in Galena, and several members of the Independent Order of Good Templars, including George F. Fullinwider of El Dorado, S.S. Jackson of Scranton, and Mrs. Kate A. Billings of Clyde. Much of the correspondence concerns efforts to advance anti-liquor agendas in local, state, and national politics. Considerable correspondence with organizations in other states is included. Although Kansas was the first state to adopt a constitutional amendment prohibiting the sale of intoxicating liquors in 1880, the law was largely unenforced.


Temperance history correspondence

Temperance history correspondence
Date: 1906
This is correspondence sent and received by members of the Kansas State Temperance Union, including Robert Norris, secretary Topeka, Kansas;, John Marshall, attorney, Ellsworth, Kansas; and Julian K. Codding, attorney, Wamego, Kansas. A letter from H. C. Ericsson, sheriff of Wabaunsee County, lists the names of several individuals that have been "seen drinking." Frequent letters are exchanged with George H. Stuessi, an attorney in Pittsburg, Kansas, regarding legal cases involving alcohol in Girard, Kansas. Although Kansas was the first state to adopt a constitutional amendment prohibiting the sale of intoxicating liquors in 1880, the law was largely unenforced.


Temperance history materials

Temperance history materials
Date: 1900 - 1912
These temperance materials include cartoons, postcards, circulars, and flyers pertaining to the prohibition movement in Kansas. A reward poster offers $35, pledged by citizens of Liberty, Kansas, for the conviction of violators of the prohibitory law. Publications include The First Friend, the official organ of the Society for the Friendless; the Sirocco, a pro-temperance publication of cartoons by N. P. L. Rosch; and a drawing by Samuel Reader with references to the devil and the Twentieth Century Total Abstinence Crusade.


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