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Asa Tongat, Kiowa man, in Indian Territory

Asa Tongat, Kiowa man, in Indian Territory
Creator: Soule, William Stinson, 1836-1908
Date: Between 1869 and 1875
This carte-de-visite of Asa Tongat is believed to have been made in the early 1870s by William S. Soule at Fort Sill, Indian Territory. Asa Tongat is identified on the image as being Kiowa, but another known example of the same image identifies him as Kiowa-Apache. William Soule is well-known for the photographs he made of Southern Plains Indians in the late 1860s and early 1870s. He arrived at Fort Dodge in 1867, moved briefly to Camp Supply a couple of years later, then relocated to Fort Sill, where he remained until returning to Boston in late 1874 or early 1875. This carte-de-visite is one of at least fifty collected by Charles L. Wilson in the 1870s. Born in West Virginia, Wilson lived in Kansas most of his life, residing in St. George, Manhattan, Miltonvale, and Topeka. Little is known about how and why he acquired the cartes-de-visite. Notations on many of them suggest they were procured in Indian Territory; some notations also indicate that Wilson was a member of Company L of the Kansas Eleventh Cavalry. Because that regiment disbanded several years before the images were made, his military service was probably unrelated to the acquisition of the photographs. The Wilson collection is characterized by the unique style in which each carte-de-visite is mounted. The mounts obscure whatever photographer's imprint may exist on the original cards. More than one photographer is represented in the collection; however, many of the images can either definitely be attributed to Will Soule or, as in this case, are deemed likely to be his work.


Big Horse and family

Big Horse and family
Date: Between 1867and 1870
This photograph shows Cheyenne Indian Big Horse, his wife, and small child. Funds for digitization provided by Mr. Steve Peckel in memory of William Chalfant.


Big Tree, Kiowa chief, in Indian Territory

Big Tree, Kiowa chief, in Indian Territory
Creator: Soule, William Stinson, 1836-1908
Date: Between 1869 and 1875
This carte-de-visite of the Kiowa chief Big Tree is believed to have been made in the early 1870s by William S. Soule at Fort Sill, Indian Territory. Soule is well-known for the photographs he made of Southern Plains Indians in the late 1860s and early 1870s. He arrived at Fort Dodge in 1867, moved briefly to Camp Supply a couple of years later, then relocated to Fort Sill, where he remained until returning to Boston in late 1874 or early 1875. This carte-de-visite is one of at least fifty collected by Charles L. Wilson in the 1870s. Born in West Virginia, Wilson lived in Kansas most of his life, residing in St. George, Manhattan, Miltonvale, and Topeka. Little is known about how and why he acquired the cartes-de-visite. Notations on many of them suggest they were procured in Indian Territory; some notations also indicate that Wilson was a member of Company L of the Kansas Eleventh Cavalry. Because that regiment disbanded several years before the images were made, his military service was probably unrelated to the acquisition of the photographs. The Wilson collection is characterized by the unique style in which each carte-de-visite is mounted. The mounts obscure whatever photographer's imprint may exist on the original cards. More than one photographer is represented in the collection; however, many of the images can either definitely be attributed to Will Soule or, as in this case, are deemed likely to be his work.


Cat-in-pait, Kiowa man, in Indian Territory

Cat-in-pait, Kiowa man, in Indian Territory
Date: Between 1869 and 1878
This carte-de-visite of Cat-in-pait, a Kiowa man, is believed to have been made in Indian Territory in the 1870s, either by William S. Soule or by William P. Bliss. Soule is well-known for the photographs he made of Southern Plains Indians in the late 1860s and early 1870s. He arrived at Fort Dodge in 1867, moved briefly to Camp Supply a couple of years later, then relocated to Fort Sill, where he remained until returning to Boston in late 1874 or early 1875. The photographer William P. Bliss moved from Wichita, Kansas to Indian Territory about the time Soule left. He was based first at the Cheyenne Agency at Darlington, then moved to Fort Sill. Some photographs thought to have been originally created by Soule also were marketed under the Bliss imprint. This carte-de-visite is one of at least fifty collected by Charles L. Wilson in the 1870s. Born in West Virginia, Wilson lived in Kansas most of his life, residing in St. George, Manhattan, Miltonvale, and Topeka. Little is known about how and why he acquired the cartes-de-visite. Notations on many of them suggest they were procured in Indian Territory; some notations also indicate that Wilson was a member of Company L of the Kansas Eleventh Cavalry. Because that regiment disbanded several years before the images were made, his military service was probably unrelated to acquisition of the photos. The Wilson collection is characterized by the unique style in which each carte-de-visite is mounted. The mounts obscure whatever photographer's imprint may exist on the original cards. The photographer who made this image cannot be identified with certainty, but it probably was either William Soule or William Bliss.


Comanche man and woman in Indian Territory

Comanche man and woman in Indian Territory
Creator: Soule, William Stinson, 1836-1908
Date: Between 1869 and 1875
This carte-de-visite of a Comanche man and woman is believed to have been made in the early 1870s by William S. Soule at Fort Sill, Indian Territory. Soule is well-known for the photographs he made of Southern Plains Indians in the late 1860s and early 1870s. He arrived at Fort Dodge in 1867, moved briefly to Camp Supply a couple of years later, then relocated to Fort Sill, where he remained until returning to Boston in late 1874 or early 1875. The carte-de-visite is one of at least fifty collected by Charles L. Wilson in the 1870s. Born in West Virginia, Wilson lived in Kansas most of his life, residing in St. George, Manhattan, Miltonvale and Topeka. Little is known about how and why he acquired the cartes-de-visite. Notations on many of them suggest they were procured in Indian Territory; some notations also indicate that Wilson was a member of Company L of the Kansas Eleventh Cavalry. Because that regiment disbanded several years before the images were made, his military service was probably unrelated to acquisition of the photos. The Wilson collection is characterized by the unique style in which each carte-de-visite is mounted. The mounts obscure whatever photographer's imprint may exist on the original cards. More than one photographer is represented in the collection; however, many of the images, including this one, can either definitely be attributed to Will Soule or are deemed likely to be his work.


Composite of Satanta and other Native American images

Composite of Satanta and other Native American images
Creator: Soule, William Stinson, 1836-1908
Date: Between 1867 and 1875
This carte-de-visite is a composite of ten Native American images believed to have been made in the late 1860s and early 1870s by William S. Soule. At least some of the images were likely made in Indian Territory; some may have been made in Kansas. The featured photo in the center is of Satanta, the Kiowa chief. Starting at the top, immediately above Satanta, the remaining images are (moving clockwise): Arapaho camp; two Arapaho girls; Kiowa or Kiowa-Apache man named Asa Tongat; unidentified camp scene; Cheyenne woman; Cheyenne man; unidentified camp scene; Cheyenne or Arapaho woman; and, two unidentified young women. Two of the photos are an exact match of a known Soule image (Satanta and Arapaho camp). Two others have the same subjects as known Soule images, but depict them in a different pose (two Arapaho girls and the Cheyenne or Arapaho woman). Will Soule is well-known for the photographs he made of Southern Plains Indians in the late 1860s and early 1870s. He arrived at Fort Dodge in 1867, moved briefly to Camp Supply a couple of years later, then relocated to Fort Sill, where he remained until returning to Boston in late 1874 or early 1875. The carte-de-visite is one of at least fifty collected by Charles L. Wilson in the 1870s. Born in West Virginia, Wilson lived in Kansas most of his life, residing in St. George, Manhattan, Miltonvale and Topeka. Little is known about how and why he acquired the cartes-de-visite. Notations on many of them suggest they were procured in Indian Territory; some notations also indicate that Wilson was a member of Company L of the Kansas Eleventh Cavalry. Because that regiment disbanded several years before the images were made, his military service was probably unrelated to acquisition of the photos. The Wilson collection is characterized by the unique style in which each carte-de-visite is mounted. The mounts obscure whatever photographer's imprint may exist on the original cards. More than one photographer is represented in the collection; however, many of the images can either definitely be attributed to Will Soule or are deemed likely to be his work. Three of the photographs in the composite are also included in the Wilson collection as individual cartes-de-visite--Asa Tongat (Item 227905), the Cheyenne man (Item 303271), and the Cheyenne woman (Item 303272).


Kichai man and woman in Indian Territory

Kichai man and woman in Indian Territory
Creator: Soule, William Stinson, 1836-1908
Date: Between 1869 and 1875
This carte-de-visite of a Kichai man and woman (var Keeche, Keechi, Kitsai, Ketchi) is believed to have been made in the early 1870s by William S. Soule at Fort Sill, Indian Territory. Soule is well-known for the photographs he made of Southern Plains Indians in the late 1860s and early 1870s. He arrived at Fort Dodge in 1867, moved briefly to Camp Supply a couple of years later, then relocated to Fort Sill, where he remained until returning to Boston in late 1874 or early 1875. This carte-de-visite is one of at least fifty collected by Charles L. Wilson in the 1870s. Born in West Virginia, Wilson lived in Kansas most of his life, residing in St. George, Manhattan, Miltonvale, and Topeka. Little is known about how and why he acquired the cartes-de-visite. Notations on many of them suggest they were procured in Indian Territory; some notations also indicate that Wilson was a member of Company L of the Kansas Eleventh Cavalry. Because that regiment disbanded several years before the images were made, his military service was probably unrelated to the acquisition of the photographs. The Wilson collection is characterized by the unique style in which each carte-de-visite is mounted. The mounts obscure whatever photographer's imprint may exist on the original cards. More than one photographer is represented in the collection; however, many of the images can either definitely be attributed to Will Soule or, as in this case, are deemed likely to be his work.


Kichai man and woman, in Indian Territory

Kichai man and woman, in Indian Territory
Date: Between 1869 and 1878
This carte-de-visite of a Native American man and woman is believed to have been made in the 1870s at Fort Sill, Indian Territory. An inscription on the image mount identifies them as Kichai (var Keeche, Keechi, Kitsai, Ketchi), but a description of the same image on a stereocard in another collection suggests they may have been Apache. The stereocard attributes the photo to William P. Bliss, but it is more likely that the photographer was William S. Soule. Some photographs originally created by Soule also were marketed under the Bliss imprint. Will Soule is well-known for the photographs he made of Southern Plains Indians in the late 1860s and early 1870s. He arrived at Fort Dodge in 1867, moved briefly to Camp Supply a few years later, then relocated to Fort Sill, where he remained until returning to Boston in late 1874 or early 1875. Bliss moved from Wichita, Kansas to Indian Territory about the time Soule left. He was based first at the Cheyenne Agency at Darlington, then moved to Fort Sill. This carte-de-visite is one of at least fifty collected by Charles L. Wilson in the 1870s. Born in West Virginia, Wilson lived in Kansas most of his life, residing in St. George, Manhattan, Miltonvale and Topeka. Little is known about how and why he acquired the cartes-de-visite. Notations on many of them suggest they were procured in Indian Territory; some notations also indicate that Wilson was a member of Company L of the Kansas Eleventh Cavalry. Because that regiment disbanded several years before the images were made, his military service was probably unrelated to acquisition of the photos. The Wilson collection is characterized by the unique style in which each carte-de-visite is mounted. The mounts obscure whatever photographer's imprint may exist on the original cards. More than one photographer is represented in the collection; however, many of the images can either definitely be attributed to Will Soule or are deemed likely to be his work.


Kichai woman, Indian Territory

Kichai woman, Indian Territory
Date: Between 1869 and 1878
This carte-de-visite of a Kichai woman (var Keeche, Keechi, Kitsai, Ketchi) is believed to have been made in the 1870s at Fort Sill, in Indian Territory. An identical image in another collection identifies the photographer as William P. Bliss, but it is more likely that the photographer was William S. Soule. Some photographs originally created by Soule also were marketed under the Bliss imprint. Will Soule is well-known for the photographs he made of Southern Plains Indians in the late 1860s and early 1870s. He arrived at Fort Dodge in 1867, moved briefly to Camp Supply a few years later, then relocated to Fort Sill, where he remained until returning to Boston in late 1874 or early 1875. Bliss moved from Wichita, Kansas to Indian Territory about the time Soule left. He was based first at the Cheyenne Agency at Darlington, then moved to Fort Sill. This carte-de-visite is one of at least fifty collected by Charles L. Wilson in the 1870s. Born in West Virginia, Wilson lived in Kansas most of his life, residing in St. George, Manhattan, Miltonvale and Topeka. Little is known about how and why he acquired the cartes-de-visite. Notations on many of them suggest they were procured in Indian Territory; some notations also indicate that Wilson was a member of Company L of the Kansas Eleventh Cavalry. Because that regiment disbanded several years before the images were made, his military service was probably unrelated to acquisition of the photos. The Wilson collection is characterized by the unique style in which each carte-de-visite is mounted. The mounts obscure whatever photographer's imprint may exist on the original cards. More than one photographer is represented in the collection; however, many of the images can either definitely be attributed to Will Soule or are deemed likely to be his work.


Kicking Bird, Kiowa chief, in Indian Territory

Kicking Bird, Kiowa chief, in Indian Territory
Creator: Soule, William Stinson, 1836-1908
Date: Between 1869 and 1875
This carte-de-visite of the Kiowa chief Kicking Bird was made in the early 1870s by William S. Soule at Fort Sill, Indian Territory. Soule is well-known for the photographs he made of Southern Plains Indians in the late 1860s and early 1870s. He arrived at Fort Dodge in 1867, moved briefly to Camp Supply a couple of years later, then relocated to Fort Sill, where he remained until returning to Boston in late 1874 or early 1875. This carte-de-visite is one of at least fifty collected by Charles L. Wilson in the 1870s. Born in West Virginia, Wilson lived in Kansas most of his life, residing in St. George, Manhattan, Miltonvale, and Topeka. Little is known about how and why he acquired the cartes-de-visite. Notations on many of them suggest they were procured in Indian Territory; some notations also indicate that Wilson was a member of Company L of the Kansas Eleventh Cavalry. Because that regiment disbanded several years before the images were made, his military service was probably unrelated to the acquisition of the photographs. The Wilson collection is characterized by the unique style in which each carte-de-visite is mounted. The mounts obscure whatever photographer's imprint may exist on the original cards. More than one photographer is represented in the collection; however, many of the images can either definitely be attributed to Will Soule or, as in this case, are deemed likely to be his work.


Kiowa man and woman in Indian Territory

Kiowa man and woman in Indian Territory
Creator: Soule, William Stinson, 1836-1908
Date: Between 1869 and 1875
This carte-de-visite of a Kiowa man and woman is believed to have been made in the early 1870s by William S. Soule at Fort Sill, Indian Territory. Soule is well-known for the photographs he made of Southern Plains Indians in the late 1860s and early 1870s. He arrived at Fort Dodge in 1867, moved briefly to Camp Supply a couple of years later, then relocated to Fort Sill, where he remained until returning to Boston in late 1874 or early 1875. The carte-de-visite is one of at least fifty collected by Charles L. Wilson in the 1870s. Born in West Virginia, Wilson lived in Kansas most of his life, residing in St. George, Manhattan, Miltonvale and Topeka. Little is known about how and why he acquired the cartes-de-visite. Notations on many of them suggest they were procured in Indian Territory; some notations also indicate that Wilson was a member of Company L of the Kansas Eleventh Cavalry. Because that regiment disbanded several years before the images were made, his military service was probably unrelated to acquisition of the photos. The Wilson collection is characterized by the unique style in which each carte-de-visite is mounted. The mounts obscure whatever photographer's imprint may exist on the original cards. More than one photographer is represented in the collection; however, many of the images, including this one, can either definitely be attributed to Will Soule or are deemed likely to be his work.


Kiowa man in Indian Territory

Kiowa man in Indian Territory
Date: Between 1869 and 1878
This carte-de-visite of a Kiowa man is believed to have been made in Indian Territory in the 1870s, either by William S. Soule or by William P. Bliss. Soule is well-known for the photographs he made of Southern Plains Indians in the late 1860s and early 1870s. He arrived at Fort Dodge in 1867, moved briefly to Camp Supply a couple of years later, then relocated to Fort Sill, where he remained until returning to Boston in late 1874 or early 1875. The photographer William P. Bliss moved from Wichita, Kansas to Indian Territory about the time Soule left. He was based first at the Cheyenne Agency at Darlington, then moved to Fort Sill. Some photographs thought to have been originally created by Soule also were marketed under the Bliss imprint. This carte-de-visite is one of at least fifty collected by Charles L. Wilson in the 1870s. Born in West Virginia, Wilson lived in Kansas most of his life, residing in St. George, Manhattan, Miltonvale, and Topeka. Little is known about how and why he acquired the cartes-de-visite. Notations on many of them suggest they were procured in Indian Territory; some notations also indicate that Wilson was a member of Company L of the Kansas Eleventh Cavalry. Because that regiment disbanded several years before the images were made, his military service was probably unrelated to acquisition of the photos. The Wilson collection is characterized by the unique style in which each carte-de-visite is mounted. The mounts obscure whatever photographer's imprint may exist on the original cards. The photographer who made this image cannot be identified with certainty, but it probably was either William Soule or William Bliss.


Kiowa woman in Indian Territory

Kiowa woman in Indian Territory
Creator: Soule, William Stinson, 1836-1908
Date: Between 1869 and 1875
This carte-de-visite of a Kiowa woman is believed to have been made in the early 1870s by William S. Soule at Fort Sill, Indian Territory. Soule is well-known for the photographs he made of Southern Plains Indians in the late 1860s and early 1870s. He arrived at Fort Dodge in 1867, moved briefly to Camp Supply a couple of years later, then relocated to Fort Sill, where he remained until returning to Boston in late 1874 or early 1875. This carte-de-visite is one of at least fifty collected by Charles L. Wilson in the 1870s. Born in West Virginia, Wilson lived in Kansas most of his life, residing in St. George, Manhattan, Miltonvale, and Topeka. Little is known about how and why he acquired the cartes-de-visite. Notations on many of them suggest they were procured in Indian Territory; some notations also indicate that Wilson was a member of Company L of the Kansas Eleventh Cavalry. Because that regiment disbanded several years before the images were made, his military service was probably unrelated to the acquisition of the photographs. The Wilson collection is characterized by the unique style in which each carte-de-visite is mounted. The mounts obscure whatever photographer's imprint may exist on the original cards. More than one photographer is represented in the collection; however, many of the images can either definitely be attributed to Will Soule or, as in this case, are deemed likely to be his work.


Koh-to, Kiowa brave, in Indian Territory

Koh-to, Kiowa brave, in Indian Territory
Creator: Soule, William Stinson, 1836-1908
Date: Between 1869 and 1875
This carte-de-visite of Koh-to, a member of the Kiowa tribe, is believed to have been made in the early 1870s by William S. Soule at Fort Sill, Indian Territory. Soule is well-known for the photographs he made of Southern Plains Indians in the late 1860s and early 1870s. He arrived at Fort Dodge in 1867, moved briefly to Camp Supply a couple of years later, then relocated to Fort Sill, where he remained until returning to Boston in late 1874 or early 1875. This carte-de-visite is one of at least fifty collected by Charles L. Wilson in the 1870s. Born in West Virginia, Wilson lived in Kansas most of his life, residing in St. George, Manhattan, Miltonvale, and Topeka. Little is known about how and why he acquired the cartes-de-visite. Notations on many of them suggest they were procured in Indian Territory; some notations also indicate that Wilson was a member of Company L of the Kansas Eleventh Cavalry. Because that regiment disbanded several years before the images were made, his military service was probably unrelated to the acquisition of the photographs. The Wilson collection is characterized by the unique style in which each carte-de-visite is mounted. The mounts obscure whatever photographer's imprint may exist on the original cards. More than one photographer is represented in the collection; however, many of the images can either definitely be attributed to Will Soule or, as in this case, are deemed likely to be his work.


Mexican boy, Comanche captive, in Indian Territory

Mexican boy, Comanche captive, in Indian Territory
Creator: Soule, William Stinson, 1836-1908
Date: Between 1869 and 1875
This carte-de-visite of a Mexican boy is believed to have been made in the early 1870s by William S. Soule at Fort Sill, Indian Territory. An inscription on the image indicates that he was a captive of the Comanche. William Soule is well-known for the photographs he made of Southern Plains Indians in the late 1860s and early 1870s. He arrived at Fort Dodge in 1867, moved briefly to Camp Supply a couple of years later, then relocated to Fort Sill, where he remained until returning to Boston in late 1874 or early 1875. This carte-de-visite is one of at least fifty collected by Charles L. Wilson in the 1870s. Born in West Virginia, Wilson lived in Kansas most of his life, residing in St. George, Manhattan, Miltonvale, and Topeka. Little is known about how and why he acquired the cartes-de-visite. Notations on many of them suggest they were procured in Indian Territory; some notations also indicate that Wilson was a member of Company L of the Kansas Eleventh Cavalry. Because that regiment disbanded several years before the images were made, his military service was probably unrelated to the acquisition of the photographs. The Wilson collection is characterized by the unique style in which each carte-de-visite is mounted. The mounts obscure whatever photographer's imprint may exist on the original cards. More than one photographer is represented in the collection; however, many of the images can either definitely be attributed to Will Soule or, as in this case, are deemed likely to be his work.


Native American woman and baby in Indian Territory

Native American woman and baby in Indian Territory
Date: Between 1869 and 1875
This carte-de-visite of a Native American woman and baby is believed to have been made in the early 1870s at Fort Sill, Indian Territory. An inscription on the image mount identifies them as Kiowa, but the style of the cradleboard and descriptions of the image in other collections suggest they were Comanche. Identical photos in other collections identify the photographer as William P. Bliss, but it is just as likely that the photographer was William S. Soule. Some photographs originally created by Soule also were marketed under the Bliss imprint. Will Soule is well-known for the photographs he made of Southern Plains Indians in the late 1860s and early 1870s. He arrived at Fort Dodge in 1867, moved briefly to Camp Supply a couple of years later, then relocated to Fort Sill, where he remained until returning to Boston in late 1874 or early 1875. Bliss moved from Wichita, Kansas to Indian Territory about the time Soule left. He was based first at the Cheyenne Agency at Darlington, then moved to Fort Sill. This carte-de-visite is one of at least fifty collected by Charles L. Wilson in the 1870s. Born in West Virginia, Wilson lived in Kansas most of his life, residing in St. George, Manhattan, Miltonvale and Topeka. Little is known about how and why he acquired the cartes-de-visite. Notations on many of them suggest they were procured in Indian Territory; some notations also indicate that Wilson was a member of Company L of the Kansas Eleventh Cavalry. Because that regiment disbanded several years before the images were made, his military service was probably unrelated to acquisition of the photos. The Wilson collection is characterized by the unique style in which each carte-de-visite is mounted. The mounts obscure whatever photographer's imprint may exist on the original cards. More than one photographer is represented in the collection; however, many of the images can either definitely be attributed to Will Soule or are deemed likely to be his work.


Ots-Kits, Kichai tribe, in Indian Territory

Ots-Kits, Kichai tribe, in Indian Territory
Creator: Soule, William Stinson, 1836-1908
Date: Between 1869 and 1875
This carte-de-visite of Ots-Kits, a member of the Kichai tribe (var Keeche, Keechi, Kitsai, Ketchi), is believed to have been made in the early 1870s by William S. Soule at Fort Sill, Indian Territory. Soule is well-known for the photographs he made of Southern Plains Indians in the late 1860s and early 1870s. He arrived at Fort Dodge in 1867, moved briefly to Camp Supply a couple of years later, then relocated to Fort Sill, where he remained until returning to Boston in late 1874 or early 1875. This carte-de-visite is one of at least fifty collected by Charles L. Wilson in the 1870s. Born in West Virginia, Wilson lived in Kansas most of his life, residing in St. George, Manhattan, Miltonvale, and Topeka. Little is known about how and why he acquired the cartes-de-visite. Notations on many of them suggest they were procured in Indian Territory; some notations also indicate that Wilson was a member of Company L of the Kansas Eleventh Cavalry. Because that regiment disbanded several years before the images were made, his military service was probably unrelated to the acquisition of the photographs. The Wilson collection is characterized by the unique style in which each carte-de-visite is mounted. The mounts obscure whatever photographer's imprint may exist on the original cards. More than one photographer is represented in the collection; however, many of the images can either definitely be attributed to Will Soule or, as in this case, are deemed likely to be his work.


Pacer, Kiowa-Apache chief, in Indian Territory

Pacer, Kiowa-Apache chief, in Indian Territory
Date: Between 1869 and 1875
This carte-de-visite of the Kiowa-Apache chief Pacer is believed to have been made in Indian Territory in the early 1870s, either by William S. Soule or by William P. Bliss. Soule is well-known for the photographs he made of Southern Plains Indians in the late 1860s and early 1870s. He arrived at Fort Dodge in 1867, moved briefly to Camp Supply a couple of years later, then relocated to Fort Sill, where he remained until returning to Boston in late 1874 or early 1875. The photographer William P. Bliss moved from Wichita, Kansas to Indian Territory about the time Soule left. He was based first at the Cheyenne Agency at Darlington, then moved to Fort Sill. Some photographs thought to have been originally created by Soule also were marketed under the Bliss imprint. This carte-de-visite is one of at least fifty collected by Charles L. Wilson in the 1870s. Born in West Virginia, Wilson lived in Kansas most of his life, residing in St. George, Manhattan, Miltonvale, and Topeka. Little is known about how and why he acquired the cartes-de-visite. Notations on many of them suggest they were procured in Indian Territory; some notations also indicate that Wilson was a member of Company L of the Kansas Eleventh Cavalry. Because that regiment disbanded several years before the images were made, his military service was probably unrelated to acquisition of the photos. The Wilson collection is characterized by the unique style in which each carte-de-visite is mounted. The mounts obscure whatever photographer's imprint may exist on the original cards. The photographer who made this image cannot be identified with certainty, but it probably was either William Soule or William Bliss.


Quats, Kichai, Indian Territory

Quats, Kichai, Indian Territory
Date: Between 1869 and 1878
This carte-de-visite of a Native American man named Quats is believed to have been made in the 1870s at Fort Sill, Indian Territory. An inscription on the image mount identifies him as Kichai (var Keeche, Keechi, Kitsai, Ketchi), but a description of the same image on a stereocard in another collection suggests he may have been Arapaho. The stereocard attributes the photo to William P. Bliss, but it is more likely that the photographer was William S. Soule. Some photographs originally created by Soule also were marketed under the Bliss imprint. Will Soule is well-known for the photographs he made of Southern Plains Indians in the late 1860s and early 1870s. He arrived at Fort Dodge in 1867, moved briefly to Camp Supply a couple of years later, then relocated to Fort Sill, where he remained until returning to Boston in late 1874 or early 1875. Bliss moved from Wichita, Kansas to Indian Territory about the time Soule left. He was based first at the Cheyenne Agency at Darlington, then moved to Fort Sill. This carte-de-visite is one of at least fifty collected by Charles L. Wilson in the 1870s. Born in West Virginia, Wilson lived in Kansas most of his life, residing in St. George, Manhattan, Miltonvale and Topeka. Little is known about how and why he acquired the cartes-de-visite. Notations on many of them suggest they were procured in Indian Territory; some notations also indicate that Wilson was a member of Company L of the Kansas Eleventh Cavalry. Because that regiment disbanded several years before the images were made, his military service was probably unrelated to acquisition of the photos. The Wilson collection is characterized by the unique style in which each carte-de-visite is mounted. The mounts obscure whatever photographer's imprint may exist on the original cards. More than one photographer is represented in the collection; however, many of the images can either definitely be attributed to Will Soule or are deemed likely to be his work.


Satank, Kiowa chief, in Indian Territory

Satank, Kiowa chief, in Indian Territory
Creator: Soule, William Stinson, 1836-1908
Date: Between 1869 and 1871
This carte-de-visite of the Kiowa leader Satank (Set-angya, Set-angia, Set-ankeah, Sitting Bear) was made circa 1870 by William S. Soule at Fort Sill, Indian Territory. Satank was killed in 1871 while being transported along with Satanta and Big Tree to stand trial for murder in Jacksboro, Texas. William Soule is well-known for the photographs he made of Southern Plains Indians in the late 1860s and early 1870s. He arrived at Fort Dodge in 1867, moved briefly to Camp Supply a couple of years later, then relocated to Fort Sill, where he remained until returning to Boston in late 1874 or early 1875. This carte-de-visite is one of at least fifty collected by Charles L. Wilson in the 1870s. Born in West Virginia, Wilson lived in Kansas most of his life, residing in St. George, Manhattan, Miltonvale, and Topeka. Little is known about how and why he acquired the cartes-de-visite. Notations on many of them suggest they were procured in Indian Territory; some notations also indicate that Wilson was a member of Company L of the Kansas Eleventh Cavalry. Because that regiment disbanded several years before the images were made, his military service was probably unrelated to the acquisition of the photographs. The Wilson collection is characterized by the unique style in which each carte-de-visite is mounted. The mounts obscure whatever photographer's imprint may exist on the original cards. More than one photographer is represented in the collection; however, many of the images can either definitely be attributed to Will Soule or, as in this case, are deemed likely to be his work.


Soloso, son of Satanta, in Indian Territory

Soloso, son of Satanta, in Indian Territory
Date: Between 1869 and 1878
This carte-de-visite of Soloso, son of the Kiowa chief Satanta, is believed to have been made in Indian Territory in the 1870s, either by William S. Soule or by William P. Bliss. Soule is well-known for the photographs he made of Southern Plains Indians in the late 1860s and early 1870s. He arrived at Fort Dodge in 1867, moved briefly to Camp Supply a couple of years later, then relocated to Fort Sill, where he remained until returning to Boston in late 1874 or early 1875. The photographer William P. Bliss moved from Wichita, Kansas to Indian Territory about the time Soule left. He was based first at the Cheyenne Agency at Darlington, then moved to Fort Sill. Some photographs thought to have been originally created by Soule also were marketed under the Bliss imprint. This carte-de-visite is one of at least fifty collected by Charles L. Wilson in the 1870s. Born in West Virginia, Wilson lived in Kansas most of his life, residing in St. George, Manhattan, Miltonvale, and Topeka. Little is known about how and why he acquired the cartes-de-visite. Notations on many of them suggest they were procured in Indian Territory; some notations also indicate that Wilson was a member of Company L of the Kansas Eleventh Cavalry. Because that regiment disbanded several years before the images were made, his military service was probably unrelated to acquisition of the photos. The Wilson collection is characterized by the unique style in which each carte-de-visite is mounted. The mounts obscure whatever photographer's imprint may exist on the original cards. The photographer who made this image cannot be identified with certainty, but it probably was either William Soule or William Bliss.


Tar-loo, Kiowa boy, in Indian Territory

Tar-loo, Kiowa boy, in Indian Territory
Creator: Soule, William Stinson, 1836-1908
Date: Between 1869 and 1875
This carte-de-visite of a Kiowa boy named Tar-loo is believed to have been made in the early 1870s by William S. Soule at Fort Sill, Indian Territory. Soule is well-known for the photographs he made of Southern Plains Indians in the late 1860s and early 1870s. He arrived at Fort Dodge in 1867, moved briefly to Camp Supply a couple of years later, then relocated to Fort Sill, where he remained until returning to Boston in late 1874 or early 1875. This carte-de-visite is one of at least fifty collected by Charles L. Wilson in the 1870s. Born in West Virginia, Wilson lived in Kansas most of his life, residing in St. George, Manhattan, Miltonvale, and Topeka. Little is known about how and why he acquired the cartes-de-visite. Notations on many of them suggest they were procured in Indian Territory; some notations also indicate that Wilson was a member of Company L of the Kansas Eleventh Cavalry. Because that regiment disbanded several years before the images were made, his military service was probably unrelated to the acquisition of the photographs. The Wilson collection is characterized by the unique style in which each carte-de-visite is mounted. The mounts obscure whatever photographer's imprint may exist on the original cards. More than one photographer is represented in the collection; however, many of the images can either definitely be attributed to Will Soule or, as in this case, are deemed likely to be his work.


Three Comanche women in Indian Territory

Three Comanche women in Indian Territory
Creator: Soule, William Stinson, 1836-1908
Date: Between 1869 and 1875
This carte-de-visite of three Comanche women is believed to have been made in the early 1870s by William S. Soule at Fort Sill, Indian Territory. Soule is well-known for the photographs he made of Southern Plains Indians in the late 1860s and early 1870s. He arrived at Fort Dodge in 1867, moved briefly to Camp Supply a couple of years later, then relocated to Fort Sill, where he remained until returning to Boston in late 1874 or early 1875. The carte-de-visite is one of at least fifty collected by Charles L. Wilson in the 1870s. Born in West Virginia, Wilson lived in Kansas most of his life, residing in St. George, Manhattan, Miltonvale and Topeka. Little is known about how and why he acquired the cartes-de-visite. Notations on many of them suggest they were procured in Indian Territory; some notations also indicate that Wilson was a member of Company L of the Kansas Eleventh Cavalry. Because that regiment disbanded several years before the images were made, his military service was probably unrelated to acquisition of the photos. The Wilson collection is characterized by the unique style in which each carte-de-visite is mounted. The mounts obscure whatever photographer's imprint may exist on the original cards. More than one photographer is represented in the collection; however, many of the images, including this one, can either definitely be attributed to Will Soule or are deemed likely to be his work.


To-an-ka, son of Kiowa chief Lone Wolf, in Indian Territory

To-an-ka, son of Kiowa chief Lone Wolf, in Indian Territory
Creator: Soule, William Stinson, 1836-1908
Date: Between 1869 and 1873
This carte-de-visite of To-an-ka, son of the Kiowa chief Lone Wolf, is believed to have been made in the early 1870s by William S. Soule at Fort Sill, Indian Territory. To-an-ka (var Tau-ankia, Ti-Bone-Ne, Tibone) was killed in Texas in December 1873. William Soule is well-known for the photographs he made of Southern Plains Indians in the late 1860s and early 1870s. He arrived at Fort Dodge in 1867, moved briefly to Camp Supply a couple of years later, then relocated to Fort Sill, where he remained until returning to Boston in late 1874 or early 1875. This carte-de-visite is one of at least fifty collected by Charles L. Wilson in the 1870s. Born in West Virginia, Wilson lived in Kansas most of his life, residing in St. George, Manhattan, Miltonvale, and Topeka. Little is known about how and why he acquired the cartes-de-visite. Notations on many of them suggest they were procured in Indian Territory; some notations also indicate that Wilson was a member of Company L of the Kansas Eleventh Cavalry. Because that regiment disbanded several years before the images were made, his military service was probably unrelated to the acquisition of the photographs. The Wilson collection is characterized by the unique style in which each carte-de-visite is mounted. The mounts obscure whatever photographer's imprint may exist on the original cards. More than one photographer is represented in the collection; however, many of the images can either definitely be attributed to Will Soule or, as in this case, are deemed likely to be his work.


Two Apache men in Indian Territory

Two Apache men in Indian Territory
Creator: Soule, William Stinson, 1836-1908
Date: Between 1869 and 1875
This carte-de-visite of two Apache men is believed to have been made in the early 1870s by William S. Soule at Fort Sill, Indian Territory. It carries a notation identifying the men as Apache, but they more likely were Kiowa-Apache. Soule is well-known for the photographs he made of Southern Plains Indians in the late 1860s and early 1870s. He arrived at Fort Dodge in 1867, moved briefly to Camp Supply a couple of years later, then relocated to Fort Sill, where he remained until returning to Boston in late 1874 or early 1875. The carte-de-visite is one of at least fifty collected by Charles L. Wilson in the 1870s. Born in West Virginia, Wilson lived in Kansas most of his life, residing in St. George, Manhattan, Miltonvale and Topeka. Little is known about how and why he acquired the carte-de-visites. Notations on many of them suggest they were procured in Indian Territory; some notations also indicate that Wilson was a member of Company L of the Kansas Eleventh Cavalry. Because that regiment disbanded several years before the images were made, his military service was probably unrelated to acquisition of the photos. The Wilson collection is characterized by the unique style in which each carte-de-visite is mounted. The mounts obscure whatever photographer's imprint may exist on the original cards. More than one photographer is represented in the collection; however, many of the images, including this one, can either definitely be attributed to Will Soule or are deemed likely to be his work.


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