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Showing 1 - 14 of 14 (results per page: 10 | 25 | 50)


Carved Hematite Rabbit from 14CO385

Carved Hematite Rabbit from 14CO385
Date: 1400-1700 CE
This is a rendering of a rabbit carved into a concretion of hematite recovered from archeological site number 14CO385, a village near Arkansas City, Kansas occupied between 1400 CE and 1700 CE by the ancestors of the modern-day Wichita and Affiliated Tribes. It was found in the 1990s by Kansas Historical Society archeologists excavating a large, deep food storage pit that later was filled with village trash. The specimen is 20.97 mm long, 11.12 mm high, 6.42 mm thick, and weighs 1.6 grams. Apparently, the artist saw the image of a rabbit in the naturally formed concretion and improved on it with a few well-placed modifications. It is unique for this site, this time period, and this group of people. There is no clear evidence that would suggest how it was used by the person that possessed it.


Corner-Notched Arrow Points from 14EL313

Corner-Notched Arrow Points from 14EL313
Date: 1000-1100 CE
These six arrow points were just a few of those recovered at the Kraus site in Ellis County during the 2015 Kansas Archeology Training Program field school. Archeologists consider corner-notched points to be the earliest form of arrow points that are found in the Great Plains. The notches aided in hafting the point to the arrow shaft.


Dr. D. Jayne's Tonic Vermifuge Bottle from 14OS1308

Dr. D. Jayne's Tonic Vermifuge Bottle from 14OS1308
Date: 1916-1929
This bottle was found at a multicomponent site in Osage County and donated to the Kansas Historical Society in 2014. The wording on the patent medicine bottle of Tonic Vermifuge proclaims it to be made by Dr. D. Jayne's of Philadelphia. A bottle maker's mark on the bottom shows that the bottle was made by the Illinois Glass Company between 1916-1929. Archeologists use the term multicomponent to indicate a site has been occupied periodically throughout time. At this site, artifacts indicate intermittent occupations from the Archaic, Early Ceramic, and Middle Ceramic Periods in addition to a modern occupation.


Gothic pepper sauce bottle from Quindaro, 14WY314

Gothic pepper sauce bottle from Quindaro, 14WY314
Date: 1857-1863
This Gothic style pepper sauce bottle was excavated from the Quindaro Townsite (14WY314), an archaeological district now part of Kansas City, Kansas. These bottles are sometimes more commonly called Cathedral style because the panels appear to display cathedral windows.


Great Bend aspect Lower Walnut focus (ancestral Wichita) Cooking Pot from the Larcom-Haggard Site, 14CO1

Great Bend aspect Lower Walnut focus (ancestral Wichita) Cooking Pot from the Larcom-Haggard Site, 14CO1
Date: ca. 1568 CE
This ceramic cooking pot is from an ancestral Wichita archeological site near Arkansas City, Kansas, the Larcom-Haggard site. It was excavated by Kansas Historical Society archeologists in advance of the construction of US 166. It is typical of early Wichita pots, which are distinct from most North American aboriginal pottery in having flat bottoms. Other characteristics include the inclusion of burned shell mixed with the clay to strengthen the pot and paired handles. This pot came from a trash-filled storage pit with a radiocarbon date of ca. 1568 CE. Pottery like this, along with the remains of grass thatched houses and a variety of distinctive stone and bone tools, are part of a set of characteristics that archeologists call the Great Bend aspect, which existed between 1400-1700 CE in central and south-central Kansas. A Great Bend aspect grass thatched house and associated artifacts types, including ceramic pots, are on exhibit in the Kansas Museum of History.


Munkers Creek Ceramic Effigy from the William Young Site, 14MO304

Munkers Creek Ceramic Effigy from the William Young Site, 14MO304
Date: 3550 - 3050 BCE
This ceramic head is Kansas' oldest fired clay artifact. Archeologists discovered the fired clay head in the early 1960s during excavations at the William Young archeological site in Morris County, Kansas, near Council Grove. The head pictured here is on display in the main gallery of the Kansas Museum of History. The effigy was created by people whose way of living and tool complex is called the Munkers Creek phase by archeologists. The Munkers Creek phase lasted for about 500 years from 3550 to 3050 BCE.


PaleoIndian projectile point

PaleoIndian projectile point
Date: 11000-7000 BCE
This Late Paleoindian point is called a Dalton and functioned as a spear tip. It was found along the Blue River in Kansas and donated to the Kansas Historical Society in 1925. Late Paleoindian people traveled in small groups, hunting large game, including now extinct bison. Stone tools help reveal how these people lived, traveled, and differed from other groups. Late Paleoindian points are typically long, thin, and narrow, and carefully made. Points with minor damage were often resharpened, altering their original shape.


Paleoindian Projectile Point from 14PO2

Paleoindian Projectile Point from 14PO2
Date: 11500 - 9000 BCE
This broken Early Paleoindian point functioned as a spear tip. It was recovered from archeological site 14PO2 in Pottawatomie County. Early Paleoindian people are thought to have been highly mobile, small bands that hunted large game, including some now extinct species. Stone tools help reveal how these people lived, traveled, and differed from other groups. Early Paleoindian points are often long, thin, and narrow, and have one or more short flakes called flutes removed from one or both sides of the point base.


Paleoindian projectile point

Paleoindian projectile point
Date: 11000-7000 BCE
This Late Paleoindian point is called a Dalton and functioned as a spear tip. It was found in Atchison County and donated to the Kansas Historical Society in 1973. Late Paleoindian people traveled in small groups, hunting large game, including now extinct bison. Stone tools help reveal how these people lived, traveled, and differed from other groups. Late Paleoindian points are typically long, thin, and narrow, and carefully made. Points with minor damage were often resharpened, altering their original shape.


Paleoindian projectile point

Paleoindian projectile point
Date: 11000-12000 BCE
This type of Paleoindian point is called a Clovis and functioned as a spear tip. It was found along the Kansas River and donated in 1925 to the Kansas Historical Society. Early Paleoindian people are thought to have been highly mobile, small bands that hunted large game, including some now extinct species. Stone tools help reveal how these people lived, traveled, and differed from other groups. Early Paleoindian points are often long, thin, and narrow, and have one or more short flakes called flutes removed from one or both sides of the point base.


Petroglyphs from the Moore-McCollum Site, 14CO325

Petroglyphs from the Moore-McCollum Site, 14CO325
Date: 10/09/1979
These petropglyphs were located on a limestone boulder at the Moore-McCallum site in Cowley County. They show the face and torso of an anthropomorphic (having a human form or attributes) figure, a bird-like figure and a circle and arrow figure. The photographs were taken in 1979 as part of a statewide project recording existing petroglyphs.


Printer's Type from the Jotham Meeker Farmstead, 14FR308

Printer's Type from the Jotham Meeker Farmstead, 14FR308
Date: 1849-1855
These three pieces of movable type were recovered from the Jotham Meeker farmstead in Franklin County. They were used in a printing press to print books, pamphlets, or newspapers. Shown here are a 10-point "d," an 18-point "C" and an ampersand (&). The scale of the type is so small that it is not easily visible with the naked eye. The site was excavated in 1985 at a Kansas Archeology Training Program. Jotham Meeker served as a Baptist missionary among the Ottawa on their reservation. Meeker established the first printing operation in what is today Kansas. Printing operations were carried out between 1849 and 1855 only.


Whiteware Bowl from Quindaro, 14WY314

Whiteware Bowl from Quindaro, 14WY314
Date: 1849-1865
This plain white bowl, recovered from Quindaro in Wyandotte County during excavations in the 1980s, was actually quite well traveled. It was manufactured in England for and imported by E. A. and S. R. Filley of St. Louis, Missouri. We know this from their maker's mark, which was printed on the back side of the dish. After it broke and was discarded, archeologists recovered the widely scattered pieces and were able to reconstruct most of the dish.


Whiteware Plates from Quindaro, 14WY314

Whiteware Plates from Quindaro, 14WY314
Date: 1849-1865
These two plain whiteware dishes were recovered from excavations at Quindaro in Wyandotte County. Archeologists found the pieces widely separated and reconstructed the plates. The dinner plate was actually quite well traveled, as it was manufactured in England for and imported by E. A. and S. R. Filley of St. Louis, Missouri. We know this from their maker's mark, which was printed on the back side of the dish.


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