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155 Howitzer

155 Howitzer
Creator: Hughes, James Clark, 1888-1964
Date: Undated
This 155 mm Howitzer is of the type used during World War I. Captain James Hughes took this picture but did not identify the location or date. James C. Hughes, as part of the 35th Division, left Fort Sill, Oklahoma, and traveled to Hoboken, New Jersey, where he boarded the troop ship "Ceramic" on May 18, 1918. Hughes arrived in Liverpool, England, on June 1, 1918 and then landed at Le Havre, France, on June 9, 1918. Hughes fought in the battles of St. Michael and the Meuse-Argonne. He was at Verdun on Armistice Day, November 11, 1918. He took no photos of the actual fighting. He did take many photographs after the war as part of the Army of Occupation until he left France on July 18, 1919. A full biography of James Clark Hughes is available on Kansapedia.


155 Howitzer

155 Howitzer
Creator: Hughes, James Clark, 1888-1964
Date: Undated
This is a 155 Howitzer which would have been used during World War I. Captain James Hughes took this picture but did not identify the location or date. James C. Hughes, as part of the 35th Division, left Fort Sill, Oklahoma, and traveled to Hoboken, New Jersey, where he boarded the troop ship "Ceramic" on May 18, 1918. Hughes arrived in Liverpool, England, on June 1, 1918 and then landed at Le Havre, France, on June 9, 1918. Hughes fought in the battles of St. Michael and the Meuse-Argonne. He was at Verdun on Armistice Day, November 11, 1918. He took no photos of the actual fighting. He did take many photographs after the war as part of the Army of Occupation until he left France on July 18, 1919. A full biography of James Clark Hughes is available on Kansapedia.


155 Howitzer

155 Howitzer
Creator: Hughes, James Clark, 1888-1964
Date: Undated
This closeup is of a 155 mm Howitzer which would have been used during World War I. Captain James Hughes took this picture but did not identify the location or date. James C. Hughes, as part of the 35th Division, left Fort Sill, Oklahoma, and traveled to Hoboken, New Jersey, where he boarded the troop ship "Ceramic" on May 18, 1918. Hughes arrived in Liverpool, England, on June 1, 1918 and then landed at Le Havre, France, on June 9, 1918. Hughes fought in the battles of St. Michael and the Meuse-Argonne. He was at Verdun on Armistice Day, November 11, 1918. He took no photos of the actual fighting. He did take many photographs after the war as part of the Army of Occupation until he left France on July 18, 1919. A full biography of James Clark Hughes is available on Kansapedia.


155 Howitzer

155 Howitzer
Creator: Hughes, James Clark, 1888-1964
Date: Undated
This is a side view of a 155 mm Howitzer. It is the type that would have been used during World War I. Captain James Hughes took this photo but did not identify the location or date. James C. Hughes, as part of the 35th Division, left Fort Sill, Oklahoma, and traveled to Hoboken, New Jersey, where he boarded the troop ship "Ceramic" on May 18, 1918. Hughes arrived in Liverpool, England, on June 1, 1918 and then landed at Le Havre, France, on June 9, 1918. Hughes fought in the battles of St. Michael and the Meuse-Argonne. He was at Verdun on Armistice Day, November 11, 1918. He took no photos of the actual fighting. He did take many photographs after the war as part of the Army of Occupation until he left France on July 18, 1919. A full biography of James Clark Hughes is available on Kansapedia.


75mm American, gun

75mm American, gun
Creator: Hughes, James Clark, 1888-1964
Date: 1919
Hughes photographed various guns during the war. This one is a 75 mm American gun also referred to as a field gun. Hughes and fellow soldiers who were part of the 35th Division had been trained to use these. The men pictured with the gun are unidentified. James C. Hughes, as part of the 35th Division, left Fort Sill, Oklahoma, and traveled to Hoboken, New Jersey, where he boarded the troop ship "Ceramic" on May 18, 1918. Hughes arrived in Liverpool, England, on June 1, 1918 and then landed at Le Havre, France, on June 9, 1918. Hughes fought in the battles of St. Michael and the Meuse-Argonne. He was at Verdun on Armistice Day, November 11, 1918. He took no photos of the actual fighting. He did take many photographs after the war as part of the Army of Occupation until he left France on July 18, 1919. A full biography of James Clark Hughes is available at the link below to Kansapedia.


75mm British, guns

75mm British, guns
Creator: Hughes, James Clark, 1888-1964
Date: 1919
Hughes photographed various guns during the war. This one is a 75 mm British gun also referred to as a field gun. Hughes and fellow soldiers who were part of the 35th Division had been trained to use these. James C. Hughes, as part of the 35th Division, left Fort Sill, Oklahoma, and traveled to Hoboken, New Jersey, where he boarded the troop ship "Ceramic" on May 18, 1918. Hughes arrived in Liverpool, England, on June 1, 1918 and then landed at Le Havre, France, on June 9, 1918. Hughes fought in the battles of St. Michael and the Meuse-Argonne. He was at Verdun on Armistice Day, November 11, 1918. He took no photos of the actual fighting. He did take many photographs after the war as part of the Army of Occupation until he left France on July 18, 1919. A full biography of James Clark Hughes is available at the link below to Kansapedia.


75mm British, guns

75mm British, guns
Creator: Hughes, James Clark, 1888-1964
Date: 1919
Captain Hughes photographed various guns during the war. This one is a 75 mm British gun also referred to as a field gun. Hughes and fellow soldiers had been trained to use these once they got to France. James C. Hughes, as part of the 35th Division, left Fort Sill, Oklahoma, and traveled to Hoboken, New Jersey, where he boarded the troop ship "Ceramic" on May 18, 1918. Hughes arrived in Liverpool, England, on June 1, 1918 and then landed at Le Havre, France, on June 9, 1918. Hughes fought in the battles of St. Michael and the Meuse-Argonne. He was at Verdun on Armistice Day, November 11, 1918. He took no photos of the actual fighting. He did take many photographs after the war as part of the Army of Occupation until he left France on July 18, 1919. A full biography of James Clark Hughes is available at the link below to Kansapedia.


A. 4th F. A. Gettysburg

A. 4th F. A. Gettysburg
Creator: Hughes, James Clark, 1888-1964
Date: 1919
Captain Hughes photographed this scene with cannons at Gettysburg National Military Park in 1919. He labeled the photo A. 4th F.A. Gettysburg. He would probably have still been stationed at Camp Holabird, Maryland, Motor Transport School at this time. James C. Hughes, as part of the 35th Division, left Fort Sill, Oklahoma, and traveled to Hoboken, New Jersey, where he boarded the troop ship "Ceramic" on May 18, 1918. Hughes arrived in Liverpool, England, on June 1, 1918 and then landed at Le Havre, France, on June 9, 1918. Hughes fought in the battles of St. Michael and the Meuse-Argonne. He was at Verdun on Armistice Day, November 11, 1918. He took no photos of the actual fighting. He did take many photographs after the war as part of the Army of Occupation until he left France on July 18, 1919. A full biography of James Clark Hughes is available at the link below to Kansapedia.


Abbott Howitzer

Abbott Howitzer
Creator: Leonard & Martin
Date: Between 1880s and 1890s
This sepia colored photograph shows the artillery piece known as the Abbott Howitzer. The cannon, manufactured by the Ames Company of Chicopee, Massachusetts, was purchased in 1855 by free-state activist James Burnett Abbott. The howitzer protected Lawrence, Kansas, during the sacking of the city on May 21, 1856. It was later used during the Civil War by James Henry Lane's brigade in Missouri. At the end of the war, the cannon was returned to Lawrence where it remained until Abbott donated the artillery piece to the Kansas Historical Society.


Abbott Howitzer

Abbott Howitzer
Date: 1850s
This black and white photograph shows the artillery piece known as the Abbott Howitzer. The cannon, manufactured by the Ames Company of Chicopee, Massachusetts, was purchased in 1855 by free-state activist James Burnett Abbott. The howitzer protected Lawrence, Kansas, during the sacking of the city on May 21, 1856. It was later used during the Civil War by James Henry Lane's brigade in Missouri. At the end of the war, the cannon was returned to Lawrence where it remained until Abbott donated the artillery piece to the Kansas Historical Society.


Albert D. Searl to Thaddeus Hyatt

Albert D. Searl to Thaddeus Hyatt
Creator: Searl, Albert D
Date: August 21, 1856
The author wrote from Tabor, Iowa to Thaddeus Hyatt, president of the National Kansas Committee. He began the letter by mentioning a skirmish between pro-slavery and free state forces somewhere between Lawrence and Topeka. This correspondence also deals with emigrant settlements within the territory, the shipment of weapons and provisions, and the morale among the emigrants as they struggled to make ends meet. Furthermore, Searl mentioned a great deal about James Lane and his activities within Kansas Territory.


Army Battery at an old settlers meeting, Bismarck Grove,

Army Battery at an old settlers meeting, Bismarck Grove,
Date: 1879
This photo shows an Army Battery at Bismarck Grove near Lawrence, Kansas, September 1879.


Battery A on the Kansas State Capitol grounds in Topeka, Kansas

Battery A on the Kansas State Capitol grounds in Topeka, Kansas
Creator: Farrow, W. F.
Date: February 1893
During the Populist War of 1893, Battery A, a militia unit from Wichita, Kansas, was stationed on the grounds outside of the Kansas State Capitol building in Topeka, Kansas. The dispute began when both the Republican and Populist parties claimed victory in the Kansas House elections in 1892. A number of contests were still being disputed when the legislative session began in January 1893. The conflict between the parties reached a crisis when the Populists locked themselves in the House Hall. The Republicans used a sledgehammer to break down the doors to the hall. The governor requested support from the state militia. After a three-day standoff, Governor Lewelling was able to negotiate an agreement with the Republican speaker of the house, which amounted to a Populist surrender. The state Supreme Court ultimately ruled in favor of the Republicans.


Battery C, 28th Battalion at Fort Sill, Oklahoma

Battery C, 28th Battalion at Fort Sill, Oklahoma
Creator: Post Studio B
Date: March 1943
This is a photograph showing Battery C, 28th Battalion at Fort Sill, Oklahoma.


Camp Phillips, Salina, Kansas

Camp Phillips, Salina, Kansas
Date: Between 1942 and 1944
This photograph shows soldiers training to shoot a 155 mm Howitzer at Camp Phillips in Salina, Kansas.


Campus scene, University of Kansas, Lawrence

Campus scene, University of Kansas, Lawrence
Date: Between 1900 and 1930
A view of the University of Kansas campus. Visible in the photograph is a large cannon, two children, a KU building, and a vehicle.


Charles Robinson to Eli Thayer

Charles Robinson to Eli Thayer
Creator: Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894
Date: April 2, 1855
Charles Robinson, writing from Lawrence, Kansas Territory to Eli Thayer in Worcester, Massachusetts, described voting irregularities in the March 30, 1855 election of members to the territorial legislature. Robinson maintained that the election was "controlled entirely by Missourians" who came to the territory, took over the polling places, and cast illegal ballots to ensure that proslavery supporters were elected to the legislature. Robinson also reported that free staters in Lawrence had formed themselves into four military companies, and urged Thayer to send Sharps rifles and cannons for these forces.


Charles Robinson to Reverend Edward Everett Hale

Charles Robinson to Reverend Edward Everett Hale
Creator: Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894
Date: April 9, 1855
Charles Robinson, writing from Lawrence, Kansas Territory, to Edward Everett Hale, commented that Free State supporters were forming military companies in response to perceived "outrageous conduct" by Missourians during the March 30, 1855, election of representatives for the territorial legislature. Robinson asked Hale to send two hundred Sharp's rifles and two cannon for the use of Lawrence settlers.


Children playing on a World War I memorial cannon in Columbus, Kansas

Children playing on a World War I memorial cannon in Columbus, Kansas
Date: 1941
This is a photograph showing children playing on a World War I memorial cannon located on the fairgrounds in Columbus, Kansas.


Crowd in grandstand Gas Dem

Crowd in grandstand Gas Dem
Creator: Hughes, James Clark, 1888-1964
Date: Undated
Captain Hughes took this picture of the crowd in the grandstand watching a Gas Demonstration. The date and location of this photo is not mentioned but it appears to have been taken at Camp Holabird. It is assumed the demonstrations are taking place with inert gases not the deadly materials used in actual chemical warfare. Captain Hughes, who had been with the Army of Occupation, returned to the U.S. with the13th Field Artillery and was stationed at Camp Holabird, Maryland until February 14,1920 after six months training in the Motor Transport School. James C. Hughes, as part of the 35th Division, left Fort Sill, Oklahoma, and traveled to Hoboken, New Jersey, where he boarded the troop ship "Ceramic" on May 18, 1918. Hughes arrived in Liverpool, England, on June 1, 1918 and then landed at Le Havre, France, on June 9, 1918. Hughes fought in the battles of St. Michael and the Meuse-Argonne. He was at Verdun on Armistice Day, November 11, 1918. He took no photos of the actual fighting. He did take many photographs after the war as part of the Army of Occupation until he left France on July 18, 1919. A full biography of James Clark Hughes is available on Kansapedia.


Field artillery, Fort Leavenworth

Field artillery, Fort Leavenworth
Date: 1872
A battery of field artillery at Fort Leavenworth, Kansas.


Firing a gun from the USS New Orleans

Firing a gun from the USS New Orleans
Date: Between 1914 and 1919
A photograph showing sailors firing a gun from the USS New Orleans, a PG-34 protected cruiser. It was commissioned in 1898, decommissioned in 1922, and served during both the Spanish-American War and World War I.


Frederick Law Olmsted to James B. Abbott

Frederick Law Olmsted to James B. Abbott
Creator: Olmsted, Frederick Law, 1822-1903
Date: October 24, 1855
Frederick Law Olmstead wrote a short note from New York to James B. Abbott in Lawrence, Kansas Territory, confirming the shipment of a howitzer cannon and its accessories. It was sent in five separate cases, to avoid arousing suspicion, and was shipped to "B. Slater" in St. Louis.


Frederick Law Olmsted to James B. Abbott

Frederick Law Olmsted to James B. Abbott
Creator: Olmsted, Frederick Law, 1822-1903
Date: October 7, 1855
Frederick Law Olmstead, a New York free state fundraiser and landscape architect, wrote to James B. Abbott to report he had ordered "the instrument" [howitzer cannon], and that it would be ready to ship in three days time along with its ammunition accessories (excepting powder). Olmstead wrote he would send instructions for its use separately, so that the howitzer may be used to "best effect," which he approximated as "equally effective with a simultaneous fire of 100 muskets" and "worth a dozen field pieces."


Frederick Law Olmsted to James B. Abbott

Frederick Law Olmsted to James B. Abbott
Creator: Olmsted, Frederick Law, 1822-1903
Date: October 4, 1855
Frederick Law Olmstead, a New York free state fundraiser and landscape architect, wrote to James B. Abbott, informing him of his recent trouble securing contributions enough to purchase substantial amounts of weapons. Olmstead repeated to Abbott advice he had received from a veteran military officer, who suggested that "M's" [muskets] would serve the militia forces well enough for general use, with "S's" [Sharp's rifles] reserved for "special service." Thus, Olmstead concluded, he would send Abbott either "M's" or an "H" [howitzer, a type of cannon].


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