Kansas MemoryKansas Memory

Kansas Historical SocietyKansas Historical Society

-

Log In

Username:

Password:

After login, go to:

Register
Forgot Username?
Forgot Password?

Browse Users
Contact us

-

Martha Farnsworth

-

Podcast Archive

Governor Mike Hayden Interview
Details
Listen Now
Subscribe - iTunesSubscribe - RSS

More podcasts

-

Popular Item

undated 1977 (Box 49, Folder 4)

-

Random Item

Views of North Topeka, Kansas Views of North Topeka, Kansas

-

Site Statistics

Total images: 732,046
Bookbag items: 38,117
Registered users: 11,693

-

About

Kansas Memory has been created by the Kansas State Historical Society to share its historical collections via the Internet. Read more.

-

Syndication

Matching items: 80

Category Filters

Community Life - Events and Celebrations - Holidays - Halloween

Search within these results


       

Search Tips

Start Over | RSS Feed RSS Feed

View: Image Only | Title Only | Detailed
Sort by: TitleSort by Title, Ascending | Date | Creator | Newest

Showing 1 - 25 of 80 (results per page: 10 | 25 | 50)
Next Page >


25th Neewollah

25th Neewollah
Creator: Neewollah, Inc.
Date: October 26-29, 1983
This program describes events at the 1983 Neewollah festival in Independence, Kansas. Neewollah is a celebration that began in 1919 with alternative activities for kids. Neewollah (Halloween spelled backwards) is the oldest and largest annual festival in Kansas. For 100 years, Independence has been celebrating with parades, queen's pageant, musical theatre productions, carnival, street acts, food vendors, and much, much more. It started out small, centered around parades held on October 31. Except for years of interruption in the mid-20th century, due to the Great Depression, World War II and lack of financial support, the festival has grown from a one-day celebration to a now nine-day festival. Digitization funded by the National Historical Publications and Records Commission through the Kansas State Historical Records Advisory Board.


Banner

Banner
Date: 2001
This red, white, and blue patriotic banner was displayed in reaction to the September 11, 2001, terrorist attacks on the World Trade Center in New York City. In October 2001, shortly after the attack, the banner was produced by the fourth grade class of McCarter Elementary School in Topeka, Kansas, and used in a local Halloween parade. The banner was related to a school policy banning traditional garb in favor of patriotic-themed costumes as a reaction to the events of September 11.


Believe in the Magic Neewollah

Believe in the Magic Neewollah
Creator: Neewollah, Inc.
Date: October 22-30, 1994
This program describes events at the 1994 Neewollah festival in Independence, Kansas. Neewollah is a celebration that began in 1919 with alternative activities for kids. Neewollah (Halloween spelled backwards) is the oldest and largest annual festival in Kansas. For 100 years, Independence has been celebrating with parades, queen's pageant, musical theatre productions, carnival, street acts, food vendors, and much, much more. It started out small, centered around parades held on October 31. Except for years of interruption in the mid-20th century, due to the Great Depression, World War II and lack of financial support, the festival has grown from a one-day celebration to a now nine-day festival. Digitization funded by the National Historical Publications and Records Commission through the Kansas State Historical Records Advisory Board.


Community Spirit: The Heart of Neewollah

Community Spirit: The Heart of Neewollah
Creator: Neewollah, Inc.
Date: October 20-October 28, 1989
This program describes events at the 1989 Neewollah festival in Independence, Kansas. Neewollah is a celebration that began in 1919 with alternative activities for kids. Neewollah (Halloween spelled backwards) is the oldest and largest annual festival in Kansas. For 100 years, Independence has been celebrating with parades, queen's pageant, musical theatre productions, carnival, street acts, food vendors, and much, much more. It started out small, centered around parades held on October 31. Except for years of interruption in the mid-20th century, due to the Great Depression, World War II and lack of financial support, the festival has grown from a one-day celebration to a now nine-day festival. Digitization funded by the National Historical Publications and Records Commission through the Kansas State Historical Records Advisory Board.


Fifth Annual Neewollah Festival: Taming of Halloween

Fifth Annual Neewollah Festival: Taming of Halloween
Creator: Neewollah, Inc.
Date: October 31, 1923
This program describes events at the 1923 Neewollah festival in Independence, Kansas. Neewollah is a celebration that began in 1919 with alternative activities for kids. Neewollah (Halloween spelled backwards) is the oldest and largest annual festival in Kansas. For 100 years, Independence has been celebrating with parades, queen's pageant, musical theatre productions, carnival, street acts, food vendors, and much, much more. It started out small, centered around parades held on October 31. Except for years of interruption in the mid-20th century, due to the Great Depression, World War II and lack of financial support, the festival has grown from a one-day celebration to a now nine-day festival. Digitization funded by the National Historical Publications and Records Commission through the Kansas State Historical Records Advisory Board.


Get Eggcited! Neewollah

Get Eggcited! Neewollah
Creator: Neewollah, Inc.
Date: October 24-November 1, 2014
This program describes events at the 2014 Neewollah festival in Independence, Kansas. Neewollah is a celebration that began in 1919 with alternative activities for kids. Neewollah (Halloween spelled backwards) is the oldest and largest annual festival in Kansas. For 100 years, Independence has been celebrating with parades, queen's pageant, musical theatre productions, carnival, street acts, food vendors, and much, much more. It started out small, centered around parades held on October 31. Except for years of interruption in the mid-20th century, due to the Great Depression, World War II and lack of financial support, the festival has grown from a one-day celebration to a now nine-day festival. Digitization funded by the National Historical Publications and Records Commission through the Kansas State Historical Records Advisory Board.


Halloween invitation

Halloween invitation
Date: 1909
Small handwritten invitation to a 1909 Halloween party. All marks are handmade in black ink on rectangular white cardstock. Five jack-o'-lanterns are sketched across top and down left margin. The invitation was among the belongings of the Mack family, who were farmers in rural Morris County. The address "1027 Houston" may refer to the residence of Mrs. Mary Van Zile in Manhattan, Kansas.


Halloween party at Southside Grade School in Russell, Kansas

Halloween party at Southside Grade School in Russell, Kansas
Date: 1943
This is a photograph showing a kindergarten class Halloween party at Southside Grade School in Russell, Kansas.


Halloween party at Volland, Kansas

Halloween party at Volland, Kansas
Creator: Kratzer, Otto
Date: Between 1910 and 1920
This photograph shows five unidentified individuals in costumes prepared for a Halloween party in Volland, Kansas.


Halloween postcard

Halloween postcard
Creator: S. Bergman
Date: 1913
Embossed Hallowe'en postcard depicting a girl and boy bobbing for apples, inside a decorative border of alternating jack-o'-lanterns and black cats. Printed Hallowe'en greeting on front, and handwritten message on back addressed to Philip Hambleton of Topeka, Kansas, from Aunt Lela. Elaborate color postcards were popular during the early 20th century. This example was manufactured by S. Bergman of New York.


Halloween postcard

Halloween postcard
Creator: Raphael Tuck & Sons Co. Ltd.
Date: 1911
Embossed Halloween postcard copyrighted by Raphael Tuck & Sons of England. Lithographed scene depicts girl and cat seated on a flying broom and poses the question, "Don't I look like a regular witch?" One-cent postage stamp on reverse, plus a handwritten message indicating the postcard was sent to the donor, Edith DeMoss, by her sister, Margaret May. It references two different Halloween parties in the Iola, Kansas, area.


Halloween postcard

Halloween postcard
Creator: International Art Publishing Company
Date: 1908
Rectangular embossed color postcard depicting black cats and jack-o'-lanterns and the holiday greeting "Happy Hallowe'en." Elaborate color postcards were popular during the early 20th century. The International Art Publishing Company produced this example in 1908.


Halloween postcard

Halloween postcard
Date: 1910
Embossed Hallowe'en postcard depicting a trio of pumpkin figures with jack-o'-lantern heads, gourd bodies, and husk arms and legs, seated atop a large oblong squash. A girl rings a bell and blows a party horn to the side. Elaborate color postcards were popular during the early 20th century. This manufacturer of this example is unknown. Delaware, Oklahoma postal cancellation on reverse, with handwritten message to Miss Iva Capps of Buffalo, Kansas, from her Aunt Anna.


Halloween postcard

Halloween postcard
Creator: Whitney
Date: between 1920 and 1939
Embossed Hallowe'en postcard depicting children walking in front of a large jack-o'-lantern. Elaborate color postcards were popular during the early 20th century. This example was produced by Whitney of Worcester, Massachusetts.


Halloween postcard

Halloween postcard
Date: 1914
Embossed Hallowe'en postcard depicting a kneeling child cowering below a windowsill on which a black cat is perched. Printed Hallowe'en greeting on front, and handwritten message on back addressed to Philip Hambleton of Topeka, Kansas, from Mary Maxwell. Elaborate color postcards were popular during the early 20th century. This manufacturer of this example is unknown.


Halloween postcard

Halloween postcard
Creator: Wolfe Publishing
Date: 1916
Embossed Hallowe'en postcard depicting a pumpkin creature with jack-o'-lantern head and corn body in front of a large smiling moon resembling a squash. Printed Hallowe'en greeting on front, and handwritten message on back addressed to Philip Hambleton of Topeka, Kansas. Elaborate color postcards were popular during the early 20th century.


Hooked On Neewollah

Hooked On Neewollah
Creator: Neewollah, Inc.
Date: October 23-31, 1998
This program describes events at the 1998 Neewollah festival in Independence, Kansas. Neewollah is a celebration that began in 1919 with alternative activities for kids. Neewollah (Halloween spelled backwards) is the oldest and largest annual festival in Kansas. For 100 years, Independence has been celebrating with parades, queen's pageant, musical theatre productions, carnival, street acts, food vendors, and much, much more. It started out small, centered around parades held on October 31. Except for years of interruption in the mid-20th century, due to the Great Depression, World War II and lack of financial support, the festival has grown from a one-day celebration to a now nine-day festival. Digitization funded by the National Historical Publications and Records Commission through the Kansas State Historical Records Advisory Board.


How Sweet It Is! Neewollah

How Sweet It Is! Neewollah
Creator: Neewollah, Inc.
Date: October 21-29, 2011
This program describes events at the 2011 Neewollah festival in Independence, Kansas. Neewollah is a celebration that began in 1919 with alternative activities for kids. Neewollah (Halloween spelled backwards) is the oldest and largest annual festival in Kansas. For 100 years, Independence has been celebrating with parades, queen's pageant, musical theatre productions, carnival, street acts, food vendors, and much, much more. It started out small, centered around parades held on October 31. Except for years of interruption in the mid-20th century, due to the Great Depression, World War II and lack of financial support, the festival has grown from a one-day celebration to a now nine-day festival. Digitization funded by the National Historical Publications and Records Commission through the Kansas State Historical Records Advisory Board.


"I Think You're Gonna Like It Here!" Neewollah 2001

"I Think You're Gonna Like It Here!" Neewollah 2001
Creator: Neewollah, Inc.
Date: October 17-27, 2001
This program describes events at the 2001 Neewollah festival in Independence, Kansas. Neewollah is a celebration that began in 1919 with alternative activities for kids. Neewollah (Halloween spelled backwards) is the oldest and largest annual festival in Kansas. For 100 years, Independence has been celebrating with parades, queen's pageant, musical theatre productions, carnival, street acts, food vendors, and much, much more. It started out small, centered around parades held on October 31. Except for years of interruption in the mid-20th century, due to the Great Depression, World War II and lack of financial support, the festival has grown from a one-day celebration to a now nine-day festival. Digitization funded by the National Historical Publications and Records Commission through the Kansas State Historical Records Advisory Board.


Kansas' Largest Celebration Neewollah

Kansas' Largest Celebration Neewollah
Creator: Neewollah, Inc.
Date: October 29-31, 1959
This program describes events at the 1959 Neewollah festival in Independence, Kansas. Neewollah is a celebration that began in 1919 with alternative activities for kids. Neewollah (Halloween spelled backwards) is the oldest and largest annual festival in Kansas. For 100 years, Independence has been celebrating with parades, queen's pageant, musical theatre productions, carnival, street acts, food vendors, and much, much more. It started out small, centered around parades held on October 31. Except for years of interruption in the mid-20th century, due to the Great Depression, World War II and lack of financial support, the festival has grown from a one-day celebration to a now nine-day festival. Digitization funded by the National Historical Publications and Records Commission through the Kansas State Historical Records Advisory Board.


Martha Farnsworth Scrapbook #3

Martha Farnsworth Scrapbook #3
Creator: Farnsworth, Martha, 1867-1924
Date: 1915-1918
This is a scrapbook compiled by Martha Farnsworth. The scrapbook includes materials related to the P Square G Club, which stands for the Play Square Gang. The P Square G Club was the name given to Martha's Sunday school group that she began teaching in the early 1900's. The scrapbook contains photographs of the P Square G Club enjoying activities like fishing, swimming, and various holiday celebrations. The scrapbook also includes drawings and caricatures drawn by Martha Farnsworth. Martha Farnsworth lived in Topeka, Kansas from 1887 to 1924. Her scrapbooks not only reveal her values and the activities in her life, but also provide a picture of American life at that time. Some of the notable aspects of Martha's life include her participation in social reform movements, membership in social clubs and activities, her deep religious convictions and her vigorous energy level.


Martha Farnsworth scrapbook #4

Martha Farnsworth scrapbook #4
Creator: Farnsworth, Martha, 1867-1924
Date: 1920
This is a scrapbook compiled by Martha Farnsworth. The scrapbook includes materials related to the P Square G Club, which stands for the Play Square Gang. The P Square G Club was the name given to Martha's Sunday school group that she began teaching in the early 1900's. The scrapbook depicts members of the P Square G Club embarking into their adult life. Photographs show members joining different branches of the military, going to college, and settling down with significant others. The scrapbook also includes a self-published newsletter about recent news and gossip concerning the group called "The Tattler". Martha Farnsworth lived in Topeka, Kansas from 1887 to 1924. Her scrapbooks not only reveal her values and the activities in her life, but also provide a picture of American life at that time. Some of the notable aspects of Martha's life include her participation in social reform movements, membership in social clubs and activities, her deep religious convictions and her vigorous energy level.


Mary Fox interview, Kinsley, Kansas

Mary Fox interview, Kinsley, Kansas
Creator: Fox, Mary Alice (Johnston)
Date: September 28, 2011
This transcript of an interview with Mary Fox is part of an oral history project entitled "Patterns of Change, Edwards County, Kansas 1950-1970" conducted by the Kinsley Public Library. The project was supported by a Kansas Humanities Council Heritage Grant. Fox talks of her family, education, and her memories of the Edwards County community.


Meet Me At Neewollah

Meet Me At Neewollah
Creator: Neewollah, Inc.
Date: October 20-30, 2004
This program describes events at the 2004 Neewollah festival in Independence, Kansas. Neewollah is a celebration that began in 1919 with alternative activities for kids. Neewollah (Halloween spelled backwards) is the oldest and largest annual festival in Kansas. For 100 years, Independence has been celebrating with parades, queen's pageant, musical theatre productions, carnival, street acts, food vendors, and much, much more. It started out small, centered around parades held on October 31. Except for years of interruption in the mid-20th century, due to the Great Depression, World War II and lack of financial support, the festival has grown from a one-day celebration to a now nine-day festival. Digitization funded by the National Historical Publications and Records Commission through the Kansas State Historical Records Advisory Board.


Neeewollah 2003: In The Spirit of Fun For Everyone!

Neeewollah 2003: In The Spirit of Fun For Everyone!
Creator: Neewollah, Inc.
Date: October 15-25, 2003
This program describes events at the 2003 Neewollah festival in Independence, Kansas. Neewollah is a celebration that began in 1919 with alternative activities for kids. Neewollah (Halloween spelled backwards) is the oldest and largest annual festival in Kansas. For 100 years, Independence has been celebrating with parades, queen's pageant, musical theater productions, carnival, street acts, food vendors, and much, much more. It started out small, centered around parades held on October 31. Except for years of interruption in the mid-20th century, due to the Great Depression, World War II and lack of financial support, the festival has grown from a one-day celebration to a now nine-day festival. Digitization funded by the National Historical Publications and Records Commission through the Kansas State Historical Records Advisory Board.


Showing 1 - 25
Next Page >

Copyright © 2007-2020 - Kansas Historical Society - Contact Us
This website was developed in part with funding provided by the Information Network of Kansas.