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Business and Industry - Occupations/Professions - Funeral director

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Showing 1 - 14 of 14 (results per page: 10 | 25 | 50)


Frank Howard

Frank Howard
Date: Between 1942 and 1945
This is a portrait of Frank Howard, who was married to Xavia Earline Hightower-Howard. She was the first female African-American licensed funeral director and embalmer, and she owned the Citizens Funeral Home in Wichita, Kansas.


Frank and Xavia Hightower Howard

Frank and Xavia Hightower Howard
Date: Between 1998 and 2000
A portrait of Frank and Xavia Hightower Howard. They were married in 1942 and lived in Wichita, Kansas. Her mother Victoria Murdoch-Hightower owned and operated Citizens Funeral Home. After her mother's death in 1942, Xavia became the proprietor. She was the first female African-American licensed funeral director and embalmer in Kansas. Xavia was active in the community serving on many committees and boards. She retired from the funeral business in 1998.


Funeral procession of William Schroeder, Alma, Ks

Funeral procession of William Schroeder, Alma, Ks
Date: 1892
This is a photo of the funeral procession for William Schroeder as it was leaving his home on East Fourth Street in Alma. Herman Richter was a the funeral director when in this photograph from February 19, 1892. It was common in the 19th century for wakes and funerals to be held at the home of the departed. In small towns, undertakers were usually the furniture makers who also manufactured coffins. In Alma, both Richter and Hasenbank undertakers operated furniture stores. The procession is lead by a man carrying the U.S. flag, a drummer, possibly pallbearers walking, a horse-drawn glass sided hearse, and followed by horses pulling buggies. A few houses are along the street, including a stone two-story house in the background.


Governor Clyde M. Reed correspondence, Embalming Board applications

Governor Clyde M. Reed correspondence, Embalming Board applications
Creator: Kansas. Governor (1929-1931 : Reed)
Date: 1929-1931
This file includes subject correspondence relating to applications of employment for the Embalming Board. Embalming is the process of preserving a person's body for burial or cremation. This file is part of a bigger collection of Governor Clyde M. Reed correspondence.


Victoria Murdoch-Hightower

Victoria Murdoch-Hightower
Creator: Robinson Studio
Date: Between 1930 and 1935
A portrait of Victoria Murdoch-Hightower. Victoria was born in 1888 and later married Rufus Hightower, a police officer, in the 1920s. He died in the line of duty, and after his death, Victoria found work as a probation officer. Later, she went to Madam C. J. Walker's School of Cosmetology in Kansas City, Kansas and after graduation, she worked at Newt Bower's funeral home in Coffeyville, Kansas. When Newt decided to sell the business, she purchased it and changed the name to Hightower Funeral Home. She became the first female African-American funeral director in Kansas. Victoria expanded her business when she purchased Citizens Funeral Home in Wichita, Kansas. She later sold the funeral home in Coffeyville. Victoria died in 1942. Her daughter Xavia Earline Hightower, obtained her funeral director's and embalmer's licenses and began operating the funeral home. Xavia sold the business in 1998.


Victoria Murdoch-Hightower

Victoria Murdoch-Hightower
Date: Between 1915 and 1920
A portrait of Victoria Murdoch-Hightower who was born in 1888. She married Rufus Hightower, a police officer, in the 1920s. He died in the line of duty, and after his death, Victoria found work as a probation officer. Later she went to Madam C. J. Walker's School of Cosmetology in Kansas City, Kansas and after graduation, she worked at Newt Bower's funeral home in Coffeyville, Kansas. When he decided to sell the business, she purchased it and changed the name to the Hightower Funeral Home. She became the first female African-American funeral director in Kansas. Victoria expanded her business when she purchased the Citizens Funeral Home in Wichita, Kansas. She later sold the funeral home in Coffeyville. Victoria died in 1942, and her daughter Xavia Earline Hightower obtained her funeral director's and embalmer's licenses and began operating the funeral home. Xavia sold the business in 1998.


Williams Institute of Mortuary Science

Williams Institute of Mortuary Science
Date: 1941
A composite photograph showing members of the 1941 spring class of Williams Institute of Mortuary Science located in Kansas City, Kansas. Xavia Hightower Howard, from Wichita, Kansas, was a member of the class. Her mother Victoria Murdoch-Hightower owned and operated Citizens Funeral Home. After her mother's death in 1942, Xavia became the proprietor of Citizens Funeral Home. She was the first female African-American licensed funeral director and embalmer in Kansas. Xavia was active in the community serving on many committees and boards. She retired from the funeral business in 1998.


Xavia Hightower Howard

Xavia Hightower Howard
Date: Between 1980 and 1985
A photograph of Xavia Hightower Howard speaking to an unidentified group. Xavia was born in 1916 and lived in Wichita, Kansas. Her mother Victoria Murdoch-Hightower owned and operated Citizens Funeral Home. In 1941, Xavia graduated from Williams Institute of Mortuary Science, Kansas City, Kansas. After her mother's death in 1942, Xavia became the proprietor of Citizens Funeral Home. She was the first female African-American licensed funeral director and embalmer in Kansas. Xavia was active in the community serving on many committees and boards. She retired from the funeral business in 1998.


Xavia Hightower Howard

Xavia Hightower Howard
Date: Between 1980 and 1985
A photograph of Xavia Hightower Howard at an awards banquet. Xavia was born in 1916 and lived in Wichita, Kansas. Her mother Victoria Murdoch-Hightower owned and operated Citizens Funeral Home. In 1941, Xavia graduated from Williams Institute of Mortuary Science, Kansas City, Kansas. After her mother's death in 1942, Xavia became the proprietor of Citizens Funeral Home. She was the first female African-American licensed funeral director and embalmer in Kansas. Xavia was active in the community serving on many committees and boards. She retired from the funeral business in 1998.


Xavia Hightower Howard

Xavia Hightower Howard
Date: Between 1980 and 1985
A photograph of Xavia Hightower Howard who was born in 1916 and lived in Wichita, Kansas. Her mother Victoria Murdoch-Hightower owned and operated Citizens Funeral Home. In 1941, Xavia graduated from Williams Institute of Mortuary Science. After her mother's death in 1942, Xavia became the proprietor of Citizens Funeral Home. She was the first female African-American licensed funeral director and embalmer in Kansas. Xavia was active in the community serving on many committees and boards. She retired from the funeral business in 1998.


Xavia Hightower Howard

Xavia Hightower Howard
Creator: Goldberg, Jack
Date: Between 1980 and 1985
A photograph of Xavia Hightower Howard who was born in 1916 and lived in Wichita, Kansas. Her mother Victoria Murdoch-Hightower owned and operated Citizens Funeral Home. In 1941, Xavia graduated from Williams Institute of Mortuary Science, Kansas City, Kansas. After her mother's death in 1942, Xavia became the proprietor of Citizens Funeral Home. She was the first female African-American licensed funeral director and embalmer in Kansas. Xavia was active in the community serving on many committees and boards. She retired from the funeral business in 1998.


Xavia Hightower Howard

Xavia Hightower Howard
Date: 1941
A photograph of Xavia Hightower Howard possibly taken when she graduated from Williams Institute of Mortuary Science, Kansas City, Kansas. Her mother Victoria Murdoch-Hightower owned and operated Citizens Funeral Home in Wichita, Kansas. After her mother's death in 1942, Xavia became the proprietor. She was the first female African-American licensed funeral director and embalmer in Kansas. Xavia was active in the community serving on many committees and boards. She retired from the funeral business in 1998.


Xavia Hightower Howard

Xavia Hightower Howard
Date: 1984
A photograph of Xavia Hightower Howard who was born in 1916 and lived in Wichita, Kansas. Her mother Victoria Murdoch-Hightower owned and operated Citizens Funeral Home. In 1941, Xavia graduated from Williams Institute of Mortuary Science, Kansas City, Kansas. After her mother's death in 1942, Xavia became the proprietor of Citizens Funeral Home. She was the first female African-American licensed funeral director and embalmer in Kansas. Xavia was active in the community serving on many committees and boards. She retired from the funeral business in 1998.


Xavia Hightower Howard

Xavia Hightower Howard
Date: 2006
A photograph of Xavia Hightower Howard cutting a cake on her 90th birthday with her daughter Frankie Mason looking on. Xavia was born in 1916 and lived in Wichita, Kansas. Her mother Victoria Murdoch-Hightower owned and operated Citizens Funeral Home. In 1941, Xavia graduated from Williams Institute of Mortuary Science, Kansas City, Kansas. After her mother's death in 1942, Xavia became the proprietor of Citizens Funeral Home. She was the first female African-American licensed funeral director and embalmer in Kansas. Xavia was active in the community serving on many committees and boards. She retired from the funeral business in 1998.


Showing 1 - 14

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