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This is a portrait of Catherine (Kate) Elizabeth German, who was taken captive with her younger sisters, Sophia, Julia, and Adelaide, by Cheyenne Indians after their family was killed. Kate was born on March 21, 1857. On September 11, 1874, the John German family, consisting of his wife and seven children, was attacked by a band of Cheyenne east of Ft. Wallace, Kansas. Only four of the children, Catherine, Sophia, Julia, and Adelaide, were spared and taken captive. The two youngest, Julia and Adelaide (aged 7 and 5), were subsequently abandoned on the prairie in what is now the Texas panhandle. Sophia and Catherine were kept by their Cheyenne captors. Fort Wallace received word of the killings and began the search to find the girls and to negotiate their release. They found Julia and Adelaide, who had survived on their own for 6 weeks, and on March 1, 1875, the Cheyennes formally released Catherine and Sophia German at the Darlington Agency in Indian Territory (Oklahoma). The two girls were reunited with their younger sisters at Ft. Leavenworth, Kansas in June of 1875.

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Celebration in Anthony, Kansas Celebration in Anthony, Kansas

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.54 Caliber Bullets from the Mine Creek Civil War Battlefield, 14LN337

.54 Caliber Bullets from the Mine Creek Civil War Battlefield, 14LN337
Date: 1864
Shown are three of the many bullets recovered during the 1990 survey and excavation at the Mine Creek Battlefield by Kansas Historical Society Archeologists and crew. The site was the location where on October 25, 1864 Union and Confederate forces fought one of the largest cavalry battles in the Civil War. All of the artifacts are .54 caliber lead bullets. The one of the far left was manufactured by Sharps and has three grease rings. The other two bullets both have concave or hollow bases.


10,000th Kaydet is delivered Friday to armed forces

10,000th Kaydet is delivered Friday to armed forces
Creator: Wichita Eagle
Date: July 29, 1944
This article from the Wichita Eagle covers the release of the 10,000 Boeing/Stearman Kaydet training airplane and the B-29 "X" airplane. Both airplanes had their production numbers painted on their fuselage to represent their respective milestones in aircraft production. The "X" on the B-29 denoted the fact that the official production numbers for the B-29 were classified during World War II.


1000 B-29's

1000 B-29's
Creator: Boeing Airplane Company
Date: 1945
This article, published in the March 1945 edition of the Boeing Magazine, covers the completion of the 1,000 B-29 Superfortress in Wichita, Kansas.


10 Ton Holt in 210 Shellhole near Sommedieve

10 Ton Holt in 210 Shellhole near Sommedieve
Creator: Hughes, James Clark, 1888-1964
Date: January 21, 1919
Back end of ten ton Holt tractor stuck in a muddy hole created by an artillery shell near Sommedieve, France. Two soldiers are in the hole and two are next to it. James C. Hughes, as part of the 35th Division, left Fort Sill, Oklahoma, and traveled to Hoboken, New Jersey, where he boarded the troop ship "Ceramic" on May 18, 1918. Hughes arrived in Liverpool, England, on June 1, 1918 and then landed at Le Havre, France, on June 9, 1918. Hughes fought in the battles of St. Mihiel and the Meuse-Argonne. He was at Verdun on Armistice Day, November 11, 1918. He took no photos of the actual fighting. He did take many photographs after the war as part of the Army of Occupation until he left France on July 18, 1919. A full biography of James Clark Hughes is available at the link below to Kansapedia.


10 Ton Holt in 210 Shellhole near Sommedieve, France

10 Ton Holt in 210 Shellhole near Sommedieve, France
Creator: Hughes, James Clark, 1888-1964
Date: January 21, 1919
Back end of ten ton Holt tractor stuck in a hole in the mud created by an artillery shell near Sommedieve, France. Two soldiers are in the hole while ten others are gathered around. James C. Hughes, as part of the 35th Division, left Fort Sill, Oklahoma, and traveled to Hoboken, New Jersey, where he boarded the troop ship "Ceramic" on May 18, 1918. Hughes arrived in Liverpool, England, on June 1, 1918 and then landed at Le Havre, France, on June 9, 1918. Hughes fought in the battles of St. Mihiel and the Meuse-Argonne. He was at Verdun on Armistice Day, November 11, 1918. He took no photos of the actual fighting. He did take many photographs after the war as part of the Army of Occupation until he left France on July 18, 1919. A full biography of James Clark Hughes is available at the link below to Kansapedia.


10 Ton Holt in 210 Shellhole near Sommedieve, France

10 Ton Holt in 210 Shellhole near Sommedieve, France
Creator: Hughes, James Clark, 1888-1964
Date: January 21, 1919
Back end of ten ton Holt tractor stuck in a hole in the mud created by a artillery shell near Sommedieve, France. Three soldiers are in the hole and four are standing nearby. James C. Hughes, as part of the 35th Division, left Fort Sill, Oklahoma, and traveled to Hoboken, New Jersey, where he boarded the troop ship "Ceramic" on May 18, 1918. Hughes arrived in Liverpool, England, on June 1, 1918 and then landed at Le Havre, France, on June 9, 1918. Hughes fought in the battles of St. Mihiel and the Meuse-Argonne. He was at Verdun on Armistice Day, November 11, 1918. He took no photos of the actual fighting. He did take many photographs after the war as part of the Army of Occupation until he left France on July 18, 1919. A full biography of James Clark Hughes is available at the link below to Kansapedia.


10 Ton Holt in 210 Shellhole near Sommedieve, France

10 Ton Holt in 210 Shellhole near Sommedieve, France
Creator: Hughes, James Clark, 1888-1964
Date: January 21, 1919
Back end of ten ton Holt tractor stuck in a muddy hole created by an artillery shell near Sommedieve, France. One soldier is standing in the hole and two are seated in the Holt. James C. Hughes, as part of the 35th Division, left Fort Sill, Oklahoma, and traveled to Hoboken, New Jersey, where he boarded the troop ship "Ceramic" on May 18, 1918. Hughes arrived in Liverpool, England, on June 1, 1918 and then landed at Le Havre, France, on June 9, 1918. Hughes fought in the battles of St. Mihiel and the Meuse-Argonne. He was at Verdun on Armistice Day, November 11, 1918. He took no photos of the actual fighting. He did take many photographs after the war as part of the Army of Occupation until he left France on July 18, 1919. A full biography of James Clark Hughes is available at the link below to Kansapedia.


110th Sanitary Train, camped in Wichita Mountains, Oklahoma

110th Sanitary Train, camped in Wichita Mountains, Oklahoma
Date: February 07, 1918
This panoramic photograph shows the 110th Sanitary Train, 35th Division, camped in the Wichita Mountains in southwestern Oklahoma. It shows soldiers, wagons and tents, with the mountains in the background. The 110th Sanitary Train had a field hospital and a field ambulance section. The 35th Infantry Division was formed, initially, with Kansas and Missouri National Guard units in response to the need for soldiers in World War I.


130th Field Artillery, 35th Division regimental officers at Camp Doniphan, Oklahoma

130th Field Artillery, 35th Division regimental officers at Camp Doniphan, Oklahoma
Creator: Willard
Date: October 15, 1917
This is a panoramic photograph showing the 130th Field Artillery, 35th Division regimental officers at Camp Doniphan, Oklahoma. Captain James Clark Hughes is ninth from the left in the front row.


130th Gun Pits

130th Gun Pits
Creator: Hughes, James Clark, 1888-1964
Date: November 8, 1917
About three dozen soldiers of the 130th Field Artillery digging gun pits at Fort Sill. In 1917 James C. Hughes was Captain of Battery C, 130th Field Artillery, Kansas National Guard. He was stationed at Camp Doniphan, Oklahoma, for field artillery training. Camp Doniphan is adjacent to Fort Sill which is just outside Lawton, Oklahoma. The 130th Field Artillery, Kansas National Guard, trained at both in 1917 and 1918 as part of the 35th Division. The 35th Division was constituted in 1917 as one of the 17 National Guard divisions authorized for service in World War I. The division was organized from the National Guard of Kansas and Missouri. The 35th included three machinegun battalions, three field artillery regiments, four infantry regiments, one engineer regiment and one signal battalion with a total strength of 26,373. A full biography of James Clark Hughes is available at the link below to Kansapedia.


130th Gun Pits

130th Gun Pits
Creator: Hughes, James Clark, 1888-1964
Date: November 8, 1917
Soldiers of the 130th Field Artillery digging gun pits at Fort Sill. Captain Hughes may be the soldier at the far right. One soldier is holding a pick ax. Others are working with shovels. In 1917 James C. Hughes was Captain of Battery C, 130th Field Artillery, Kansas National Guard. He was stationed at Camp Doniphan, Oklahoma, for field artillery training. Camp Doniphan is adjacent to Fort Sill which is just outside Lawton, Oklahoma. The 130th Field Artillery, Kansas National Guard, trained at both in 1917 and 1918 as part of the 35th Division. The 35th Division was constituted in 1917 as one of the 17 National Guard divisions authorized for service in World War I. The division was organized from the National Guard of Kansas and Missouri. The 35th included three machinegun battalions, three field artillery regiments, four infantry regiments, one engineer regiment and one signal battalion with a total strength of 26,373. A full biography of James Clark Hughes is available at the link below to Kansapedia.


137th Infantry Regiment, 35th Division, Belgium, Luxemborg

137th Infantry Regiment, 35th Division, Belgium, Luxemborg
Creator: United States Army Signal Corps
Date: December 1944
This photograph shows troops from the 137th Infantry Regiment, 35th Division moving across a snow covered field near the Belgium- Luxemborg border.


137th Infantry Regiment, 35th Division, Germany

137th Infantry Regiment, 35th Division, Germany
Creator: United States Army Signal Corps
Date: February 06, 1945
This photograph shows members from the 137th Infantry Regiment, 1st Brigade of the 35th Division waiting to move on a reconnaissance mission between the German towns of Heinsberg and Unterbruch.


137th Infantry Regiment, 35th Division, Rheinberg, Germany

137th Infantry Regiment, 35th Division, Rheinberg, Germany
Creator: United States Army Signal Corps
Date: 1945
This photograph shows members from the 137th Infantry Regiment, the 35th Division of the 9th United States Army moving through the streets of Rheinberg, Germany as the city was under enemy mortar fire.


137th Infantry Regiment, 35th Division, Sainlez, Belgium

137th Infantry Regiment, 35th Division, Sainlez, Belgium
Creator: United States Army Signal Corps
Date: January 09, 1945
This photograph shows members of the 137th Infantry Regiment, 35th Division, laying down a harassing fire to give cover to advancing infantry men. The individuals have been identified from left to right as: Private Ken McKeever of Holton, Kansas and Private Lloyd Gottemyller from Vancouver, Washington.


137th Infantry Regiment, 35th Division, Tintange, Belgium

137th Infantry Regiment, 35th Division, Tintange, Belgium
Creator: United States Army Signal Corps
Date: December 27, 1944
This photograph shows members from the 137th Infantry Regiment of the 35th Division in Tintange, Belgium. The town was captured by the 35th Division and was still smoking from fires started by artillery shelling.


137th Infantry Regiment, 35th Division, Tintange, Belgium

137th Infantry Regiment, 35th Division, Tintange, Belgium
Creator: United States Army Signal Corps
Date: December 27, 1944
This black and white photograph shows members from the 137th Infantry Regiment, of the 35th Division, in Tintange, Belgium as they advance toward the Luxembourg border.


137th Infantry Regiment, 35th Division, Tintange, Belgium

137th Infantry Regiment, 35th Division, Tintange, Belgium
Creator: United States Army Signal Corps
Date: 1944
This photograph shows members from the 137th Infantry Regiment of the 35th Division standing near a war torn building in Tintange, Belgium.


137th Intantry Regiment, 35th Division, Nancy, France

137th Intantry Regiment, 35th Division, Nancy, France
Creator: United States Army Signal Corps
Date: September 22, 1944
This photograph shows members from the 137th Infantry Regiment of the 35th Division using radio equipment to report their situation to headquarters as troops prepare to cross a field near Nancy, France.


14th Annual Reunion of the 32nd U.S. Volunteer Infantry Association

14th Annual Reunion of the 32nd U.S. Volunteer Infantry Association
Creator: Anderson
Date: August 30, 1947
A panoramic photo and a cropped version of the same photo of the 14th Annual Reunion of the 32nd U.S. Volunteer Infantry Association, Fort Leavenworth, Kansas. Benton Roy Hanan is in the first row (squatting) 12th from the right. His wife, N. Ethel Brown Hanan is standing behind him.


155 Howitzer

155 Howitzer
Creator: Hughes, James Clark, 1888-1964
Date: Undated
This closeup is of a 155 mm Howitzer which would have been used during World War I. Captain James Hughes took this picture but did not identify the location or date. James C. Hughes, as part of the 35th Division, left Fort Sill, Oklahoma, and traveled to Hoboken, New Jersey, where he boarded the troop ship "Ceramic" on May 18, 1918. Hughes arrived in Liverpool, England, on June 1, 1918 and then landed at Le Havre, France, on June 9, 1918. Hughes fought in the battles of St. Michael and the Meuse-Argonne. He was at Verdun on Armistice Day, November 11, 1918. He took no photos of the actual fighting. He did take many photographs after the war as part of the Army of Occupation until he left France on July 18, 1919. A full biography of James Clark Hughes is available on Kansapedia.


155 Howitzer

155 Howitzer
Creator: Hughes, James Clark, 1888-1964
Date: Undated
This is a side view of a 155 mm Howitzer. It is the type that would have been used during World War I. Captain James Hughes took this photo but did not identify the location or date. James C. Hughes, as part of the 35th Division, left Fort Sill, Oklahoma, and traveled to Hoboken, New Jersey, where he boarded the troop ship "Ceramic" on May 18, 1918. Hughes arrived in Liverpool, England, on June 1, 1918 and then landed at Le Havre, France, on June 9, 1918. Hughes fought in the battles of St. Michael and the Meuse-Argonne. He was at Verdun on Armistice Day, November 11, 1918. He took no photos of the actual fighting. He did take many photographs after the war as part of the Army of Occupation until he left France on July 18, 1919. A full biography of James Clark Hughes is available on Kansapedia.


155 Howitzer

155 Howitzer
Creator: Hughes, James Clark, 1888-1964
Date: Undated
This is a 155 Howitzer which would have been used during World War I. Captain James Hughes took this picture but did not identify the location or date. James C. Hughes, as part of the 35th Division, left Fort Sill, Oklahoma, and traveled to Hoboken, New Jersey, where he boarded the troop ship "Ceramic" on May 18, 1918. Hughes arrived in Liverpool, England, on June 1, 1918 and then landed at Le Havre, France, on June 9, 1918. Hughes fought in the battles of St. Michael and the Meuse-Argonne. He was at Verdun on Armistice Day, November 11, 1918. He took no photos of the actual fighting. He did take many photographs after the war as part of the Army of Occupation until he left France on July 18, 1919. A full biography of James Clark Hughes is available on Kansapedia.


155 Howitzer

155 Howitzer
Creator: Hughes, James Clark, 1888-1964
Date: Undated
This 155 mm Howitzer is of the type used during World War I. Captain James Hughes took this picture but did not identify the location or date. James C. Hughes, as part of the 35th Division, left Fort Sill, Oklahoma, and traveled to Hoboken, New Jersey, where he boarded the troop ship "Ceramic" on May 18, 1918. Hughes arrived in Liverpool, England, on June 1, 1918 and then landed at Le Havre, France, on June 9, 1918. Hughes fought in the battles of St. Michael and the Meuse-Argonne. He was at Verdun on Armistice Day, November 11, 1918. He took no photos of the actual fighting. He did take many photographs after the war as part of the Army of Occupation until he left France on July 18, 1919. A full biography of James Clark Hughes is available on Kansapedia.


15th Kansas Volunteer Cavalry

15th Kansas Volunteer Cavalry
Date: Between 1861 and 1865
This tintype shows Captain Oran Curtis, to the left, with members of the 15th Kansas Volunteer Cavalry, Company F. Captain Curtis was the father of U.S. vice-president Charles Curtis.


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