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An Appeal from Arickaree

An Appeal from Arickaree
Creator: Howes, Cecil, 1880-1950
Date: 1940-1950
This item, written by Kansas City Star editor Charles Cecil Howes, concerns the Battle of Arickaree that took place in Kansas in 1868. Howes does not address any of the controversy surrounding the event but he does provide a solid account of the accepted facts of the combat that took place between U.S. Army soldiers, led by General George A. Forsyth (a Colonel at the time), and Indian warriors led by Cheyenne War Chief Roman Nose. This item also includes some excerpts from General Forsyth's "Thrilling Days of Army Life," which had not yet been published at the time Howes' article was printed.


Brass Bracelet from the Village on Pawnee Fork, 14NS403

Brass Bracelet from the Village on Pawnee Fork, 14NS403
Date: 1867
This bracelet was fashioned out of a brass wire. The bracelet was recovered from the Village on the Pawnee Fork in Ness County during excavations in 1977. The site was home to several hundred Southern Cheyenne and Southern Teton Oglala. It was destroyed by order of Major General Winifred S. Hancock in 1867. The Village on Pawnee Fork is listed in the National Register of Historic Places.


Buttons from the Village on Pawnee Fork, 14NS403

Buttons from the Village on Pawnee Fork, 14NS403
Date: 1867
These two buttons were recovered from the Village on the Pawnee Fork in Ness County during excavations in 1977. "Bullet" buttons, such as these, are generally considered for military use. They predate the 1867 destruction of the village and may have, by that time, been used by civilians. They all have a steel wire shank for attachment. This village, occupied by several hundred Southern Cheyenne and Southern Teton Oglala, was destroyed in 1867 by order of Major General Winifred S. Hancock. The site is listed in the National Register of Historic Places.


Coffee Mill Handle from the Village on Pawnee Fork, 14NS403

Coffee Mill Handle from the Village on Pawnee Fork, 14NS403
Date: 1867
This coffee mill handle was recovered from the Village on the Pawnee Fork (also called Hancock's Village) in Ness County during excavations in 1977. Coffee mills are used to grind roasted coffee beans prior to brewing. The handle is made of cast iron and was part of a manual grinder. The broken handle was cleaned by electrolysis, which passes an electrical current through a liquid solution to separate the rust from the artifact. The Village on Pawnee Fork, home to several hundred Southern Cheyenne and Southern Teton Oglala people was destroyed by order of Major General Winifred S. Hancock in 1867. The site is listed in the National Register of Historic Places.


Coffee Mill Hopper from the Village on Pawnee Fork, 14NS403

Coffee Mill Hopper from the Village on Pawnee Fork, 14NS403
Date: 1867
This coffee mill hopper fragment was recovered from the Village on the Pawnee Fork (also called Hancock's Village) in Ness County during excavations in 1977. Coffee mills are used to grind roasted coffee beans prior to brewing. This hopper fragment is made of cast iron and was part of a manual coffee grinder. The hopper fragment was cleaned by electrolysis, which passes an electrical current through a liquid solution to separate the rust from the artifact. The Village on Pawnee Fork, home to several hundred Southern Cheyenne and Southern Teton Oglala was destroyed by order of Major General Winifred S. Hancock in 1867. The site is listed in the National Register of Historic Places.


Cone Tinklers from the Village on Pawnee Fork, 14NS403

Cone Tinklers from the Village on Pawnee Fork, 14NS403
Date: 1867
These tin cone tinklers were recovered from the Village on the Pawnee Fork in Ness County during excavations in 1977. Tinklers were used to decorate hair, clothes and other objects. The Village on Pawnee Fork, home to several hundred Southern Cheyenne and Southern Teton Oglala was destroyed by order of Major General Winifred S. Hancock in 1867. The site is listed in the National Register of Historic Places.


Firearm Main Springs from the Village on Pawnee Fork, 14NS403

Firearm Main Springs from the Village on Pawnee Fork, 14NS403
Date: 1867
These two firearm main springs were recovered from the Village on the Pawnee Fork in Ness County during excavations in 1977. The main spring on the left is from a Colt-style Model 1851 or Model 1860 revolver. The main spring on the right is from an undetermined firearm. Both were cleaned by electrolysis, which passes an electrical current through a liquid solution to separate the rust from the artifact. The Village on Pawnee Fork, home to several hundred Southern Cheyenne and Southern Teton Oglala was destroyed by order of Major General Winifred S. Hancock in 1867. The site is listed in the National Register of Historic Places.


Firearm Parts from the Village on Pawnee Fork, 14NS403

Firearm Parts from the Village on Pawnee Fork, 14NS403
Date: 1867
These firearm parts were recovered from the Village on the Pawnee Fork in Ness County during excavations in 1977. The top row shows a steel bridle for a pistol or rifle main spring swivel, a tumbler, and a Remington revolver trigger or cylinder stop spring. The bottom shows a Remington revolver cylinder stop and a Remington revolver trigger. All of these parts were cleaned by electrolysis, which passes an electrical current through a liquid solution to separate the rust from the artifact. The Village on Pawnee Fork, home to several hundred Southern Cheyenne and Southern Teton Oglala was destroyed by order of Major General Winifred S. Hancock in 1867. The site is listed in the National Register of Historic Places.


General Service Button from the Village on Pawnee Fork, 14NS403

General Service Button from the Village on Pawnee Fork, 14NS403
Date: 1867
This General Service button was recovered from the Village on the Pawnee Fork (also called Hancock's Village) in Ness County during excavations in 1977. The button, manufactured by the Scoville Manufacturing Company of Waterbury, Connecticut, measures to 3/4" or ligne 30, which is the size for a military coat. It is decorated with an eagle and shield design with a branch in one eagle claw and arrows in the other. It has a loop shank attachment on the back. The button was cleaned by electrolysis, which passes an electrical current through a liquid solution to separate the rust from the artifact. The Village on Pawnee Fork, home to several hundred Southern Cheyenne and Southern Teton Oglala was destroyed by order of Major General Winifred S. Hancock in 1867. The site is listed in the National Register of Historic Places.


Horse Tack Buckles from the Village on the Pawnee Fork, 14NS403

Horse Tack Buckles from the Village on the Pawnee Fork, 14NS403
Date: 1867
These three buckles were recovered from the Village on the Pawnee Fork (also called Hancock's Village) in Ness County during excavations in 1977. The buckles would have all been used for tack for either horses or mules. The center bar buckle was recovered from the area of all or part of the Oglala camp. The D-shaped buckle was either used on a saddle or the throat latch of a bridle. The roller-bar buckle was recovered from that area of the site that may have had the Cheyenne lodges. In 1867, the village of several hundred Southern Cheyenne and Southern Teton Oglala was destroyed by order of Major General Winifred S. Hancock. The site is listed in the National Register of Historic Places.


Scissor Fragment from the Village on Pawnee Fork, 14NS403

Scissor Fragment from the Village on Pawnee Fork, 14NS403
Date: 1867
This scissor half was recovered from the Village on the Pawnee Fork in Ness County during excavations in 1977. The artifact was cleaned by electrolysis which passes an electrical current through a liquid solution to separate the rust from the artifact. It was in 1867 that the village of several hundred Southern Cheyenne and Southern Teton Oglala was destroyed by order of Major General Winifred S. Hancock. The site is listed in the National Register of Historic Places.


Steel Firearm Toe Plate from the Village on Pawnee Fork, 14NS403

Steel Firearm Toe Plate from the Village on Pawnee Fork, 14NS403
Date: 1867
The steel firearm toe plate shown here was recovered from the Village on the Pawnee Fork in Ness County during excavations in 1977. A toe plate is a metal piece attached to the stock butt of a gun. The toe plate was cleaned by electrolysis, which passes an electrical current through a liquid solution to separate the rust from the artifact. The Village on Pawnee Fork, home to several hundred Southern Cheyenne and Southern Teton Oglala was destroyed by order of Major General Winifred S. Hancock in 1867. The site is listed in the National Register of Historic Places.


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