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7th Cavalry Camp, Fort Hays, Kansas

7th Cavalry Camp, Fort Hays, Kansas
Date: 1867
These two photographs represent different views of the 7th Cavalry Camp near Fort Hays, Kansas. In one photograph, men can be sitting in a field outside tents. Fort Hays was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1971.


7th Cavalry drill team, Fort Wallace, Wallace County, Kansas

7th Cavalry drill team, Fort Wallace, Wallace County, Kansas
Date: 1961
The 7th Cavalry drill team reenactment troop perform for the Fort Wallace memorial association, Fort Wallace, Wallace County, Kansas, May 1961.


7th Cavalry parade, Fort Hays, Kansas

7th Cavalry parade, Fort Hays, Kansas
Date: 1867
This photograph represents an evening parade by the 7th Cavalry near Fort Hays, Kansas. Fort Hays was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1971.


7th Cavalry reenactment, United States government cemetery, Fort Wallace, Kansas

7th Cavalry reenactment, United States government cemetery, Fort Wallace, Kansas
Date: 1961
A 7th Cavalry reenactment troop line up at the United States government cemetery at Fort Wallace, Wallace County, Kansas.


Adolph Roenigk and George W. Martin correspondence

Adolph Roenigk and George W. Martin correspondence
Creator: Roenigk, Adolph, 1847-1938
Date: October 10, 1904-January 24, 1908
In this correspondence with George W. Martin of the Kansas State Historical Society, Adolph Roenigk addresses issues related to the Pawnee Indians. In the letter dated October 10, 1904, Roenigk explains that "a Battle between the Potowatomie and the Pawnee Indians was fought here [Lincoln, Kansas] in 1863." According to Roenigk, between 14 and 16 Native Indians were killed during the fighting. Similarly, Roenigk's letter of October 24, 1906, concerns violence between Kansans and Native Indians during the late 1860s when a man named Solomon Humbarger and Solomon's brother were attacked by Native Indians. After killing one of their chiefs Roenigk states that Humbarger was shot in the thigh with an arrow.


Battle of Little Big Horn

Battle of Little Big Horn
Creator: Coffeen & Schnitger Trading Company
Date: 1876
These five postcards show scenes from the Battle of Little Big Horn after the June 25, 1876 incident between the U.S. Army's 7th Cavalry Regiment and a coalition of Plains Indians.


Battle of Little Big Horn

Battle of Little Big Horn
Creator: Coffeen & Schnitger Trading Company
Date: 1876
These six postcards show scenes from the Battle of Little Big Horn one year after the June 25, 1875, incident between the U.S. Army's 7th Cavalry Regiment and a coalition of Plains Indians. The images show monuments to Lt. J. J. Crittenden, 20th Infantry; a monument on the battle field, a pile of horse remains; a marker for Col. Keogh and 28 soldiers from Co. I, 7th Cavalry; a marker for Lt. Sturgis, 7th Cavalry; and the custodian's house at the Custer Battlefield National Cemetery.


Battle of Wounded Knee Creek, South Dakota

Battle of Wounded Knee Creek, South Dakota
Date: 1890
Postcard showing members of the Lakota Sioux tribe surrendering to the U.S. Seventh Cavalry after the Battle of Wounded Knee. The December 29, 1890, battle was considered the last major conflict between U.S. troops and Native Americans.


Brooch from 14EL430

Brooch from 14EL430
Date: 1869-1870
This delicate brass brooch was made in a filigree-like floral pattern with a possible silver center. The brooch was collected at a site that may be the location of a camp used by General George A. Custer and the Seventh Calvary. The site is near Fort Hays in Ellis County. Elizabeth Bacon Custer joined her husband, General George Custer, whenever possible at the 7th Cavalry camps. Perhaps this brooch belonged to her? Fort Hays was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1971.


Cavalry Button from 14EL428

Cavalry Button from 14EL428
Date: 1869-1870
This military button was collected during a survey in 2017 in Ellis County. The button has a "C" on the front that designates it as a cavalry button. There is embossed lettering on the button back, too faint to decipher the manufacturer's name. The site may be the location of one of General George Custer's and the Seventh Cavalry's camp sites near Fort Hays in Ellis County.


Cavalry and Infantry Buttons from 14EL430

Cavalry and Infantry Buttons from 14EL430
Date: 1869-1870
These military buttons were collected at a site that may be the location of a camp used by General George A. Custer and the Seventh Calvary. The site is near Fort Hays in Ellis County. The smaller button has a "C" on the front, for cavalry, while the larger button has an "I" on the front, for infantry.


Comanche

Comanche
Date: 1886
This black and white photograph shows a member of the 7th U. S. Cavalry holding the reins of the famous war horse "Comanche" and the 7th U. S. Cavalry flag at Old Fort Meade near Sturgis, South Dakota. Comanche was ridden by Colonel Miles Keogh at the Battle of the Little Big Horn in late June 1876 in Montana. One of many 7th U. S. Cavalry horses to survive the battle, Comanche was found two days later very badly wounded and barely able to stand. He was nursed back to health and was officially retired for life with special honors, as a living relic of that terrible struggle. Comanche died at Fort Riley, Kansas in 1890.


Daniel Read Anthony

Daniel Read Anthony
Creator: Dudensing, R.
Date: Between 1870s and 1890s
This engraving shows Daniel Read, Anthony, (1824-1904), brother of suffragist Susan B. Anthony. He migrated to the Kansas territory in 1854 as a member of the New England Emigrant Aid Company and later settled in Leavenworth, Kansas; where he established a long and successfully career as a newspaper editor and publisher. Anthony owned and operated the Leavenworth Conservative, the Bulletin, and later, in 1871, the Leavenworth Times. With the outbreak of the Civil War he left the newspaper business to enlist in the Union army as a lieutenant colonel of the First Kansas Cavalry later reassigned as the Seventh Kansas Regiment. Anthony was involved in several skirmishes and battles during the Civil War but led troops to victory at the Battle of the Little Blue. In 1862, Anthony's military career was marked with controversy for not following orders issued under General Robert Mitchell's command. On September 3, 1862, he resigned from his post and returned to Leavenworth, Kansas. Anthony became actively involved in the community serving several terms on the city council and two terms as mayor of Leavenworth. He was also elected, in 1868, President of the Republican State Convention and served as President of the Kansas Historical Society from 1885 to 1886. For nearly a century Anthony was associated with the issues and concerns of Leavenworth, Kansas. On November 12, 1904, he passed away at the age of eighty in Leavenworth, Kansas.


Daniel Read Anthony

Daniel Read Anthony
Date: Between 1880 and 1904
This black and white photograph shows Daniel Read Anthony, (1824-1904), brother of suffragist Susan B. Anthony. He migrated to the Kansas territory in 1854 as a member of the New England Emigrant Aid Company and settled in Leavenworth, Kansas; where he established a long and successfully career as a newspaper editor and publisher. Anthony owned and operated the Leavenworth Conservative, the Bulletin, and later, in 1871, the Leavenworth Times. With the outbreak of the Civil War he left the newspaper business to enlist in the Union army as a lieutenant colonel of the First Kansas Cavalry, later reassigned as the Seventh Kansas Regiment. Anthony was involved in several skirmishes and battles during the Civil War but led troops to victory at the Battle of the Little Blue. In 1862, his military career was marked with controversy for not following orders issued under General Robert Mitchell's command. On September 3, 1862, he resigned from his post and returned to Leavenworth, Kansas. Anthony became actively involved in the community serving several terms on the city council and two terms as mayor of Leavenworth. He was also elected, in 1868, President of the Republican State Convention and served as President of the Kansas Historical Society from 1885 to 1886. For nearly a century Anthony was associated with the issues and concerns of Leavenworth, Kansas. On November 12, 1904, he passed away at the age of eighty in Leavenworth, Kansas.


Daniel Read Anthony

Daniel Read Anthony
Date: Between 1854 and 1874
This carte de visite shows Daniel Read Anthony, (1824-1904), brother of suffragist Susan B. Anthony. He migrated to the Kansas territory, in 1854, as a member of the New England Emigrant Aid Company and settled in Leavenworth, Kansas; where he established a long and successfully career as a newspaper editor and publisher. Anthony owned and operated the Leavenworth Conservative, the Bulletin, and later, in 1871, the Leavenworth Times. With the outbreak of the Civil War he left the newspaper business and enlisted in the Union army as a lieutenant colonel of the First Kansas Cavalry, later reassigned as the Seventh Kansas Regiment. Anthony was involved in several skirmishes and battles during the Civil War but successfully led troops to victory at the Battle of the Little Blue. In 1862, his military career was marked with controversy for not following orders issued under General Robert Mitchell's command. On September 3, 1862, he resigned from his post and returned to Leavenworth, Kansas. Anthony became actively involved in the community serving several terms on the city council and two terms as mayor of Leavenworth. He was also elected, in 1868, President of the Republican State Convention and served as President of the Kansas Historical Society from 1885 to 1886. For nearly a century Anthony was associated with the issues and concerns of Leavenworth, Kansas. On November 12, 1904, he passed away at the age of eighty in Leavenworth.


Daniel Read Anthony

Daniel Read Anthony
Date: Between 1840 and 1860
This engraving shows Daniel Read Anthony, (1824-1904), brother of suffragist Susan B. Anthony. He migrated to the Kansas territory in 1854 as a member of the New England Emigrant Aid Company and settled in Leavenworth, Kansas; where he established a long and successful career as a newspaper editor and publisher. Anthony owned and operated the Leavenworth Conservative, the Bulletin, and later, in 1871, the Leavenworth Times. With the outbreak of the Civil War he left the newspaper business and enlisted in the U.S. army as a lieutenant colonel of the First Kansas Cavalry, later reassigned as the Seventh Kansas Regiment. Anthony was involved in several skirmishes and battles during the Civil War but led troops to victory at the Battle of the Little Blue. In 1862, his military career was marked with controversy for not following orders issued under General Robert Mitchell's command. On September 3, 1862, he resigned from his post and returned to Leavenworth, Kansas. Anthony became actively involved in the community serving several terms on the city council and two terms as mayor of Leavenworth. He was also elected, in 1868, President of the Republican State Convention and served as President of the Kansas Historical Society from 1885 to 1886. For nearly a century Anthony was associated with the issues and concerns of Leavenworth, Kansas. On November 12, 1904, he passed away at the age of eighty in Leavenworth.


Edmund G. Ross correspondence

Edmund G. Ross correspondence
Date: 1856-1865
Correspondence to and from Edmund G. Ross. A number of letters are from Ross to his wife Fannie Lathrop Ross. There is one letter from S. C. Pomeroy about Ross's request to raise a company of men. There are also a number of telegrams relating to military activities. During the Civil War Ross served in Company E of the 11th Kansas Cavalry. In 1866 he was appointed by the governor to fill the unexpired United States Senate term of James Lane, who had committed suicide. Ross served in the Senate until 1871. Transcriptions of some of the letters are included with the images of the originals.


Experiments in domestication and breeding of buffaloes (1889)  by Ado Hunnius

Experiments in domestication and breeding of buffaloes (1889) by Ado Hunnius
Creator: Hunnius, Ado, 1842-1923
Date: 1889
Written by Carl Julius Adolph "Ado" Hunnius, a collection of his thoughts on the subject of buffalo that would likely have been supported by his experiences in the U.S. Army during the American Civil War, as well as the Indian Wars that followed. Hunnius served as an enlisted man in the ranks that Custer and Hancock commanded during the 1867 campaign to pacify Native Indian tribes on the Great Plains.


General Service Buttons from 14EL430

General Service Buttons from 14EL430
Date: 1869-1870
These military buttons were collected at a site that may be the location of a camp used by General George A. Custer and the Seventh Calvary. The site is near Fort Hays in Ellis County. The four larger buttons and the small button on the left were manufactured by the Scoville Manufacturing Company of Waterbury, Connecticut. The other small button has no back mark.


George Armstrong Custer

George Armstrong Custer
Creator: Edric Eaton Studios
Date: January 11, 1872
This black and white photograph taken from a tintype shows George Armstrong Custer (1839-1876). The tintype was taken at Edric Eaton Studios, which was located in the 1200 block of Farnum in Omaha, Nebraska. Custer, a United States army cavalry officer, is remembered for commanding the U.S. Seventh Cavalry Regiment into the Battle of the Little Bighorn, on June 25, 1876, in which all of his soldiers and Custer himself were attacked and killed by a coalition of Plains Indians.


George Armstrong Custer

George Armstrong Custer
Date: Between 1860s and 1870s
This formal portrait shows George Armstrong Custer (1839-1876). Custer, a United States army cavalry officer, is remembered for commanding the U.S. Seventh Cavalry Regiment into the Battle of the Little Bighorn, on June 25, 1876, in which all of his soldiers and Custer himself were attacked and killed by a coalition of Plains Indians.


Hole-in-Top Cans from 14EL430

Hole-in-Top Cans from 14EL430
Date: 1869-1870
These two tin cans were collected at a historic site that may be the location of General George A. Custer and the Seventh Calvary's camp near Fort Hays in Ellis County. The tin cans were filled through a large hole in the top. After filling, a cap was soldered into place with lead. A pin-hole opening left for steam to vent. This final hole was sealed with lead.


Horse Tack from 14EL430

Horse Tack from 14EL430
Date: 1869-1870
These two center bar buckles were recovered from a site that may be the location of a camp used by General George A. Custer and the Seventh Calvary in Ellis County near historic Fort Hays. The buckles would have all been used for tack for either horses or mules.


Horseshoes from 14EL428

Horseshoes from 14EL428
Date: 1869-1870
These two horseshoes were among several that were collected during a survey in 2017. The shoe on the left is a government pattern. The shoe on the right is for a rear hoof. The site may be the location of one of General George Custer's and the Seventh Cavalry's camp near Fort Hays in Ellis County.


John Brown Jr. correspondence

John Brown Jr. correspondence
Creator: Brown, Jr., John
Date: 1862
Letters from John Brown Jr. concerning the 7th Kansas Cavalry and their tendency to protect slaves rather than returning them to their owners. John Brown Jr. was the son of well known abolitionist, John Brown, Sr.


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