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Home and Family - Courtship and marriage - Divorce

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Abandonment of Lucy Sharpe Brooks by Husband

Abandonment of Lucy Sharpe Brooks by Husband
Creator: Kansas. Governor (1915-1919: Capper)
Date: January 6, 1915
This file includes general correspondence relating to the abandonment of Lucy Sharpe Brooks by her husband. The first letter by Lucy Sharpe Brooks is reiterating her desire for justice of her husband after he married her and then left with her money, leaving her homeless and penniless. She is writing to Governor Capper after receiving no response from the previous Governor, George H. Hodges (1866-1947). The second letter is the Governor's office acknowledging the letter but saying the State has nothing to do with domestic matters such as Lucy Sharpe Brooks is writing about.


Abandonment of Mattie Marion by Husband

Abandonment of Mattie Marion by Husband
Creator: Kansas. Governor (1915-1919: Capper)
Date: 1913-1915
This file includes general correspondence relating to the abandonment of Mattie Marion by her husband. Topics included, but not limited to, in the correspondence is Mattie Marion being abandoned by her husband after moving to Missouri for him to return to Kansas, procedures to take her husband to court in Kinsley to support her and their child, and the role of the County and General Attorney and Governor in domestic cases. This is part of a bigger collection of Governor Arthur Capper correspondence.


Charles Robinson to Amos Adams Lawrence

Charles Robinson to Amos Adams Lawrence
Creator: Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894
Date: May 9, 1859
Transcription of a letter from the Amos Adams Lawrence Collection, Massachusetts Historical Society. Charles Robinson wrote from Lawrence, Kansas Territory, to Amos A. Lawrence in Massachusetts. Robinson described the complicated political situation which had arisen from the development of Quindaro. Personal disagreements between Abelard Guthrie, S.N. Simpson, Joel Walker, and himself were making progress difficult. Robinson hoped that, upon their resolution, they could move forward with securing a contract with the Parkville & Grand River Railroad, as well as plans for a college. Two church groups had expressed interest in opening up their own institutions, or working with Robinson to found one. Robinson included a plat map for a prospective site, to which he did not entirely give his support; he added comments regarding the admission of women to the college, and thanked Lawrence again for his support of their enterprises.


Cyrus Kurtz Holliday to Mary Dillon Holliday

Cyrus Kurtz Holliday to Mary Dillon Holliday
Creator: Holliday, Cyrus Kurtz, 1826-1900
Date: February 6, 1859
Cyrus K. Holliday, soon to return to Topeka after a productive territorial legislative session in Lawrence, wrote to his wife, Mary Holliday, in Meadville, Pennsylvania. He wrote about a festival held at the Eldridge House, and reported on several other incidents of note: the arrest of John W. Doy, captured by Missourians while helping former slaves travel to Iowa; John Brown's avoidance of capture by [John P.] Woods (at the Battle of the Spurs on January 31, 1859); and Charles Fischer's escape after being twice arrested as "a fugitive slave." Holliday also wrote that the legislature had passed and Governor Samuel Medary would approve a bill granting Josephine Branscomb a divorce. Despite Holliday's efforts, the constitutional convention would be held at Wyandotte in July. He had refused [Alfred L.] Winans' request for a recommendation.


Divorce Proctor Law

Divorce Proctor Law
Creator: Kansas. Governor (1915-1919: Capper)
Date: January 30-February 18, 1915
This letter and reply to and from Governor Capper's office discusses the divorce proctor law. In the letter from Wichita, Kansas, the author of the letter feels that the law is too general to satisfactorily settle their case. Governor Capper replies that the law was written to be general to address a variety of divorce cases across the state. This file is part of a bigger collection of Governor Arthur Capper correspondence.


John James Ingalls to Elias T. Ingalls

John James Ingalls to Elias T. Ingalls
Creator: Ingalls, John James, 1833-1900
Date: January 19, 1861
In Lawrence on January 19, 1861, attending the meeting of what proved to be the last territorial legislature, Ingalls wrote about everyone's interest in happenings outside the territory: namely, congressional action on the "Kansas Admission Bill" and the "Pacific Rail Road Bill," as well as "the condition of affairs of the South ['the secession movement']. Especially bad weather--"the snow is quite deep and the temperature below zero constantly"--had left Kansas somewhat isolated, and as they waited for news the legislature was "not doing much except discussing Union resolutions, endorsing Major [Robert] Anderson [commander of U.S. troops at Fort Sumter], and divorcing Every body that applies for rupture of the bonds of matrimony."


Legal Matters of Personal Nature

Legal Matters of Personal Nature
Creator: Kansas. Governor (1915-1919: Capper)
Date: 1915
This file includes a letter from Manchester, Kansas asking for Governor Capper's advice for a woman seeking a divorce from her husband. This is part of a bigger collection of Governor Arthur Capper correspondence.


Personal Problem - Divorce

Personal Problem - Divorce
Creator: Kansas. Governor (1915-1919: Capper)
Date: February 1915
James Fitzpatrick of Anthony, Kansas, is writing to Governor Capper for assistance in his divorce that will be before the Supreme Court. Plus, Fitzpatrick writes on behalf of his friend Mr. Hershe about getting copies of the book "The Horse and The Cow" to treat diseases. This file is part of a bigger collection of Governor Arthur Capper correspondence.


Thomas Ewing, Jr., to John J. Brasee

Thomas Ewing, Jr., to John J. Brasee
Creator: Ewing, Thomas, 1829-1896
Date: May 19, 1860
Ewing wrote this letter to John J. Brasee of Lancaster, Ohio (Ewing's hometown), in response to an apparent inquiry into the grounds for and the chances of someone acquiring an easy divorce in K.T.


Walker Winslow correspondence

Walker Winslow correspondence
Creator: Winslow, Walker, 1905-1969
Date: circa 1943 - 1969, undated (bulk 1948-1951)
This collection of papers largely consists of handwritten and typed correspondence between Walker Winslow (also under the name Harold Maine) and his third wife, Edna Mansley Winslow, the bulk of which dates from 1948-1951. The letters can be chatty and newsy, providing details about each of their daily lives and activities, what they were reading or music they were listening to, their work (his writing and therapy, her writing and painting), and other related topics. The letters could also be very self-reflective and analytical regarding their relationship to each other, discussing their sexuality and concepts of fidelity, relationships with others, their health and various injuries and illnesses they each had, money, their mutual loneliness, Edna's drinking, and other topics. Some of the letters were written while Winslow was working at and writing in Topeka. They were also written while the Winslows lived separately in Santa Fe, New Mexico; various parts of California (especially Big Sur or Oakland); various parts of New York (especially Rochester and New York City); and in Kansas. The letters document the rise and fall of their brief and intense relationship. Also in the materials are a few of Winslow's typed manuscripts and poems, many with copy-editing marks and annotations or corrections, including a copy of If a Man Be Mad, as well as two published versions of the book (one in French). There is also correspondence with friends and relatives of Winslow and/or Edna; Winslow family photographs; some sketches Edna drew, with her handwritten notes on the back, perhaps for letters to Winslow; a letter of recommendation from 1889 for Winslow's father; and extensive correspondence between Winslow and Dr. Karl Menninger. Some of this correspondence regards articles and the book Winslow wrote about the Menninger Clinic; there are also interview notes and transcripts from interviews Winslow conducted with Dr. C.F. Menninger. Topics of Winslow's writings include Henry Miller, psychiatry and life in asylums, and the Synanon Foundation.


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