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Administrative building at the State Orphans Home in Atchison, Kansas

Administrative building at the State Orphans Home in Atchison, Kansas
Creator: Lotus Engraving Company
Date: 1936
A photograph of the administration building at the State Orphans Home in Atchison, Kansas. In 1887 Kansas opened the Soldiers' Orphans' Home in Atchison for children of Union soldiers and sailors. This was the first such facility in the state for children who had lost their parents. At first limited to veterans' children aged five and under, regulations were altered in 1889 to admit all "dependent, neglected or abused children" between the ages of two and 14. The name was changed to the State Orphans' Home in 1909.


Aerial view of the Kansas State Children's Receiving Home in Atchison, Kansas

Aerial view of the Kansas State Children's Receiving Home in Atchison, Kansas
Date: 1962
An aerial view of the Kansas State Children's Receiving Home in Atchison, Kansas. In 1887, Kansas opened the Soldiers' Orphan's Home in Atchison for children of Union soldiers and sailors. This was the first such facility in the state for children who had lost their parents. At first limited to veterans' children aged five and under, regulations were altered in 1889 to admit all "dependent, neglected or abused children" between the ages of two and 14. The name was changed to the State Orphans' Home in 1909 and in 1953 to the Kansas Children's Home, and in 1955 to the Kansas Children's Receiving Home.


Aerial view of the Kansas State Children's Receiving Home in Atchison, Kansas

Aerial view of the Kansas State Children's Receiving Home in Atchison, Kansas
Date: 1960
An aerial view of the Kansas State Children's Receiving Home in Atchison, Kansas. In 1887, Kansas opened the Soldiers' Orphan's Home in Atchison for children of Union soldiers and sailors. This was the first such facility in the state for children who had lost their parents. At first limited to veterans' children aged five and under, regulations were altered in 1889 to admit all "dependent, neglected or abused children" between the ages of two and 14. The name was changed to the State Orphans' Home in 1909 and in 1953 to the Kansas Children's Home, and in 1955 to the Kansas Children's Receiving Home.


Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe Railway Company's steam locomotive #384

Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe Railway Company's steam locomotive #384
Date: Between 1880 and 1919
This black and white photograph shows children standing by the Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe Railway Company's steam locomotive #384. The children are possibly orphans that came west in search of families.


Children seated in the dining room at the State Orphans Home, Atchison, Kansas

Children seated in the dining room at the State Orphans Home, Atchison, Kansas
Creator: Lotus Engraving Company
Date: 1936
A photograph of children in the dining room of the State Orphans Home in Atchison, Kansas. In 1887 Kansas opened the Soldiers' Orphans' Home in Atchison for children of Union soldiers and sailors. This was the first such facility in the state for children who had lost their parents. At first limited to veterans' children aged five and under, regulations were altered in 1889 to admit all "dependent, neglected or abused children" between the ages of two and 14. The name was changed to the State Orphans' Home in 1909.


Display of works from the State Orphans Home in Atchison, Kansas

Display of works from the State Orphans Home in Atchison, Kansas
Creator: Lotus Engraving Company
Date: 1936
A photograph of a display showing the work of the Manual Training Department and the Girls Department at the State Orphans Home in Atchison, Kansas. In 1887 Kansas opened the Soldiers' Orphans' Home in Atchison for children of Union soldiers and sailors. This was the first such facility in the state for children who had lost their parents. At first limited to veterans' children aged five and under, regulations were altered in 1889 to admit all "dependent, neglected or abused children" between the ages of two and 14. The name was changed to the State Orphans' Home in 1909. This home protected orphan children, and gave them a chance to enjoy their childhoods.


Girls at the State Orphans Home in Atchison, Kansas

Girls at the State Orphans Home in Atchison, Kansas
Creator: Kansas. State Orphans Home
Date: 1926
A photograph of a group of girls from the State Orphans Home in Atchison, Kansas. This photograph was copied from the 20th Biennial Report for the State Orphans Home, 1926. In 1887, Kansas opened the Soldiers' Orphan's Home in Atchison for children of Union soldiers and sailors. This was the first such facility in the state for children who had lost their parents. At first limited to veterans' children aged five and under, regulations were altered in 1889 to admit all "dependent, neglected or abused children" between the ages of two and 14. The name was changed to the State Orphans Home in 1909.


Governor Clyde M. Reed correspondence, Orphans Home applications

Governor Clyde M. Reed correspondence, Orphans Home applications
Creator: Kansas. Governor (1929-1931 : Reed)
Date: 1929-1931
This file includes subject correspondence relating to applications of employment with the Orphans Home in Atchison, Kansas. Originally called the Soldiers and Sailors Orphans Home, the Orphans' Home operated from 1887 to 1976. This file is part of a bigger collection of Governor Clyde M. Reed correspondence.


Governor Clyde M. Reed correspondence, orphans

Governor Clyde M. Reed correspondence, orphans
Creator: Kansas. Governor (1929-1931 : Reed)
Date: 1929-1931
This file includes subject correspondence relating to orphanages. Topics in the correspondence cover but is not limited to orphan placement, scarlet fever epidemic at the State Orphans' Home and the establishement of an orphanage for Native American children. This file is part of a bigger collection of Governor Clyde M. Reed correspondence.


Orphan train riders Howard, Clara and James Reed

Orphan train riders Howard, Clara and James Reed
Date: Unknown
This photograph shows three siblings who came to Kansas on an orphan train: Howard Dowell, Clara Morgan and James Elliott. In New York, the children had the surname Reed.


School building and cottages at the State Orphans Home in Atchison, Kansas

School building and cottages at the State Orphans Home in Atchison, Kansas
Creator: Lotus Engraving Company
Date: 1936
A photograph of the school building and cottages at the State Orphans Home in Atchison, Kansas. In 1887 Kansas opened the Soldiers' Orphans' Home in Atchison for children of Union soldiers and sailors. This was the first such facility in the state for children who had lost their parents. At first limited to veterans' children aged five and under, regulations were altered in 1889 to admit all "dependent, neglected or abused children" between the ages of two and 14. The name was changed to the State Orphans' Home in 1909. This home protected orphan children, and gave them a chance to enjoy their childhoods.


Soldier's Orphan's Home, Atchison, Kansas

Soldier's Orphan's Home, Atchison, Kansas
Date: Between 1887 and 1908
Two views of the Soldier's Orphan's Home in Atchison, Kansas. In 1887, Kansas opened this facility for children of Union soldiers and sailors. This was the first such facility in the state for children who had lost their parents. At first limited to veterans' children aged five and under, regulations were altered in 1889 to admit all "dependent, neglected or abused children" between the ages of two and 14. The name was changed to the State Orphans' Home in 1909. This home protected orphan children, and gave them a chance to enjoy their childhoods.


Soldier's Orphan's Home, Atchison, Kansas

Soldier's Orphan's Home, Atchison, Kansas
Date: 1904
A photograph of the Soldier's Orphan's Home in Atchison, Kansas. A 1904 calendar is also included. In 1887, Kansas opened this facility for children of Union soldiers and sailors. This was the first such facility in the state for children who had lost their parents. At first limited to veterans' children aged five and under, regulations were altered in 1889 to admit all "dependent, neglected or abused children" between the ages of two and 14. The name was changed to the State Orphans' Home in 1909.


Strawberry picking at the State Orphans Home, Atchison, Kansas

Strawberry picking at the State Orphans Home, Atchison, Kansas
Creator: Lotus Engraving Company
Date: 1936
This is a photograph of children picking strawberries at the State Orphans Home in Atchison, Kansas. In 1887 Kansas opened the Soldiers' Orphans' Home in Atchison for children of Union soldiers and sailors. This was the first such facility in the state for children who had lost their parents. At first limited to veterans' children aged five and under, regulations were altered in 1889 to admit all "dependent, neglected or abused children" between the ages of two and 14. The name was changed to the State Orphans' Home in 1909.


Showing 1 - 14

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