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A gathering at Jonathan Erickson's home, Russell County, Kansas

A gathering at Jonathan Erickson's home, Russell County, Kansas
Creator: Halbe, L. W. (Leslie Winfield), 1893-1981
Date: June 12, 1913
View of people gathered at Jonathan Erickson's home in Russell County, Kansas. Also visible are a carriage and many automobiles parked in the front yard, and a large group of people standing either on the porch or in the yard.


Allen D. Birch and family gathered to listen to radio

Allen D. Birch and family gathered to listen to radio
Date: 1920-1929
Allen D. Birch and family are gathered to listen to radio at their home in Topeka, Kansas, in the 1920s.


C. G. Dick to Samuel L. Adair

C. G. Dick to Samuel L. Adair
Creator: Dick, Campbell Graham
Date: April 21, 1857
Campbell G. Dick was Reverend Adair's brother-in-law, and wrote from his home in Marshall, Highland County, Ohio, that he supported the American Missionary Association as it promoted Christianity, but was pessimistic about the chances for Kansas Territory entering the Union as a free state. He wrote that the Democratic party was controlled by the south, and asked Adair to inform him if free state men intended to vote in the elections called by the "Bogus Legislature."


C. H. Strieby residence, Council Grove, Kansas

C. H. Strieby residence, Council Grove, Kansas
Date: 1910 or later
These two photographs show the C. H. Strieby residence in Council Grove, Kansas. The Strieby family started their blacksmith and wagon business on the Santa Fe Trail in the 1860s. The first photograph shows the house surrounded by a fence and flagstone sidewalk. C. H. Strieby built a total of seven houses in Council Grove.


Cyrus Kurtz Holliday to Mary Dillon Holliday

Cyrus Kurtz Holliday to Mary Dillon Holliday
Creator: Holliday, Cyrus Kurtz, 1826-1900
Date: January 7, 1855
Cyrus K. Holliday wrote from Topeka, Kansas Territory to his wife, Mary Holliday, in Meadville, Pennsylvania. After a loving introduction, he described Kansas Territory's sunny, breezy climate. Holliday mentioned letters received from his brother and Mr. Thomas Willson, both named in previous letters, who also wanted to emigrate. He described the principle building in Topeka, which served as meeting hall, hotel, and church, and where he slept with Frye W. Giles, a free state supporter from Chicago. Holliday ended with concern for Lizzie, Mary Holliday's younger sister.


Easter picnic, Rogler Ranch

Easter picnic, Rogler Ranch
Date: 1918
This black and white photograph shows a Easter picnic at the Rogler ranch. The individuals have been identified from left as Nichal Rogler, Emily Rogler, Noad kids, (?), Anna Yeager, (?), Aunt Emily Rogler, Uncle Jim Rogler, Uncle Dave Wood, Maud Rogler, (?), last three men Uncle Nichol Goslser, Charlie Yeager, Uncle Albert.


Eating watermelon, Bourbon County, Kansas

Eating watermelon, Bourbon County, Kansas
Date: August 13, 1911
This black and white photograph shows a group of people eating watermelon in Bourbon County, Kansas.


Ellen Douglas Denison Goodnow to Harriet Goodnow

Ellen Douglas Denison Goodnow to Harriet Goodnow
Creator: Goodnow, Ellen Denison (Mrs. Isaac T.)
Date: May 18, 1856
Ellen Goodnow, wife of Isaac Goodnow, wrote to her sister-in-law, Harriet, in New England. In this mostly personal letter, Goodnow reports on the joys and limitations of life in Kansas Territory, stating "I can say truly that I enjoy life as well here as I ever did anywhere." She did not anticipate trouble from border ruffians in their area, as her family's settlement was "too far from Missouri, too near Fort Riley", telling Harriet she would be "enraptured. . .in this country"; Ellen looked forward to a visit from her.


Family camping, Uniontown, Kansas

Family camping, Uniontown, Kansas
Date: April 12, 1914
This black and white photograph shows a family in front of their tent during a camping trip, near Uniontown, Kansas.


Family group at Rogler Ranch

Family group at Rogler Ranch
Date: Between 1900 and 1920
This photographs shows the Rogler family at the Rogler Ranch in Chase County, Kansas. Back row: Uncle Frank Sauble, Marion Ford, Aunt Mattie Ford, Henry Rogler, Maud & baby George, Grandma Sauble, aunt Maryme Tarbet. First Row: Frank Ford, Tinla Ford, Helen Rogler, Irene Rogler, Wayne Rogler, Kenneth Ford, Lois Tarbet.


Gamaliel Garrison to Samuel L. Adair

Gamaliel Garrison to Samuel L. Adair
Creator: Garrison, Gamaliel
Date: Probably December 15, 1856
Gamaliel Garrison is writing to his nephew, Samuel L. Adair, from Yellow Springs, Ohio, after returning from Osawatomie, Kansas Territory. He writes of the death of his son, David Garrison, and of Frederick Brown, both killed during the Battle of Osawatomie. Garrison indicates that he had expected all his sons to settle in Kansas and that David's wife, Rachel, still speaks well of the country. He hopes that it would be possible to hold on to David's claim for his heirs. The sheet of paper also contains a letter from James Garrison. (See item #90509.)


Harvey Jones to Samuel L. Adair

Harvey Jones to Samuel L. Adair
Creator: Jones, Harvey
Date: December 14, 1859
Jones, a Congregational minister who lived in Wabaunsee, Kansas Territory, wrote to Samuel L. Adair after John Brown's attack at Harpers Ferry, Virginia. Jones asked Adair to write to him about John Brown's character, and to indicate whether Brown was associated with a church.


Henry Werth farm, Schoenchen, Kansas

Henry Werth farm, Schoenchen, Kansas
Creator: Clark, M.D.
Date: Between 1880 and 1900
This black and white photograph shows a view of Henry Werth's farm in Schoenchen, Kansas. Standing before the structure are members of the Werth family dressed in their traditional Volga German clothing of dark and simple dresses and suits. Identified from left to right: John A. Werth, Mrs. Karl Werth, Rosa Werth, and Henry Werth.


J. Augusta Goodrich Griffing to James Griffing

J. Augusta Goodrich Griffing to James Griffing
Creator: Griffing, Jemima August (Goodrich)
Date: September 17, 1859
J. Augusta (Goodrich) Griffing wrote from Hartford, Connecticut, to her husband, James Griffing, in Topeka, Kansas Territory. Mrs. Griffing was visiting family and friends in the East for the first time since her arrival in Kansas Territory in 1855. She reported on her trip from Owego, New York, to Hartford, and her decision to leave their young son, Johnny, in the care of Mr. Griffing's family in Owego. She described Johnny's behavior in some detail, and informed Mr. Griffing that she planned to start her trip back to Kansas Territory in October, 1859.


James Garrison to Samuel L. Adair

James Garrison to Samuel L. Adair
Creator: Garrison, James
Date: December 15, 1856
James Garrison writes from Antioch College in Yellow Springs, Ohio, to his cousin Samuel Adair in Kansas Territory. The letter discusses relief efforts on behalf of the free state settlers and concerns about fraud on the part of agents collecting money and goods. Garrison writes that the Cincinnati Gazette had published a long list of names of Kansas citizens who had been refused clothing by the relief society. He feels an explanation to the public was needed if the relief efforts were to be continued. The letterhead included an engraving of Antioch College. The sheet of paper also contained a letter from Gamaliel Garrison. (See item #90260.)


James Garrison to Samuel L. Adair

James Garrison to Samuel L. Adair
Creator: Garrison, James
Date: December 29, 1856
James Garrison writes to his cousin, Samuel L. Adair, that he has collected $104.75 to be used for relief in Kansas. Garrison is concerned about how to get the money to Adair and suggests that, if Adair has been able to collect on the sale of Rachel Garrison's goods, Adair should use that money instead. He asks Adair to write a letter of acknowledgement to the "Free Presbyterian" published in Yellow Springs, Ohio.


James Garrison to Samuel L. Adair

James Garrison to Samuel L. Adair
Creator: Garrison, James
Date: February 27, 1857
James Garrison write his cousin, Samuel L. Adair, about the prospects for Kansas Territory and about being harassed by ruffians. Garrison states his belief that only a large migration of free state supporters to Kansas in the spring would prevent it from becoming a slave state and describes pro-slavery plans to prevent emigration to Kansas.


Jason Brown to Samuel L. Adair

Jason Brown to Samuel L. Adair
Creator: Brown, Jason
Date: April 4, 1859
Jason Brown writes to Samuel L. Adair from Akron, Ohio, in response, evidently, to an earlier letter Adair had written him concerning placing a claim for property lost while in Kansas Territory. Brown writes that he didn't think any radical anti-slavery supporters would receive any funds from Congress in the near future. He believes that if he had been on the pro-slavery side, his claim would have been paid. He asks Adair to check his young son's (A. Brown) grave in the Lawrence cemetery to ensure that T. L. Whitney had built a picket fence around it, as he'd requested, and to pay Whitney if it had been done (or that Adair would have it done and Brown would reimburse Adair).


Jason L. Brown  to John Brown, Mary Brown, and family

Jason L. Brown to John Brown, Mary Brown, and family
Creator: Brown, Jason
Date: June 23, 1855
From Osawatomie, Kansas Territory (or from the Browns' settlement which was located in southeastern Franklin Co.), son Jason wrote the family regarding there current circumstances. Overall, he was "well pleased with the country," which he described as "very rich and beautiful," despite the fact that he and his wife Ellen had just "laid little Austin in the grave." The Browns were still living in tents and needed stoves, but "All well."


Jeremiah R. Brown to Samuel and Florella Adair

Jeremiah R. Brown to Samuel and Florella Adair
Creator: Brown, Jeremiah Root
Date: November 1, 1856
Jeremiah R. Brown writes from Hudson, Ohio, to Samuel and Florella Adair in Osawatomie, Kansas Territory. Brown reports he has raised funds to send to Kansas Territory and mentions other efforts to aid people there. He writes about helping various Brown family members and of his concerns about the "aggression of the slave power."


Jeremiah Root Brown

Jeremiah Root Brown
Cased sixth plate daguerreotype portrait of Jeremiah Root Brown (1819-1874), the brother of Florella Brown Adair and the half brother of abolitionist John Brown. He did not settle in Kansas Territory but tried to support his relatives who lived here during the territorial era.


John Brown to Mary Brown & Children All

John Brown to Mary Brown & Children All
Creator: Brown, John, 1800-1859
Date: March 2, 1859
From Springdale, Cedar County, Iowa, Brown wrote this short letter to tell his family that all was "well," despite that persistent "ague," and to discuss some family business matters: buying a team, etc.


John Brown to Mary Brown and family

John Brown to Mary Brown and family
Creator: Brown, John, 1800-1859
Date: February 1, 1856
From Osawatomie, Brown wrote of the continued severe winter and "the fierce Winds of Kansas," as well as his desire to visit the family at North Elba, New York. But he also mentioned that they had "just learned of some new, & shocking outrages at Leavenworth; & that the Free State people there have fled to Lawrence." Although more conflict threatened, Brown expected little action until the weather improved.


John Brown to Mary Brown and family

John Brown to Mary Brown and family
Creator: Brown, John, 1800-1859
Date: December 16, 1855
Soon after his return from Lawrence, where he and other volunteers had successfully defended that place, John Brown wrote from Osawatomie to give his family "a brief account of the invasion," the so-called Wakarusa War. As it turned out, Brown provided some interesting details about their preparations and arrival in the besieged city and the negotiations that were ongoing when the Browns came on the scene. The Free State leaders, according to Brown, skillfully accomplished and signed an agreement with Governor Shannon that was "much to their own liking."


John Brown to Mary Brown and family

John Brown to Mary Brown and family
Creator: Brown, John, 1800-1859
Date: September 4, 1855
In Scott Co., Iowa ("about 4 miles West of the Mississippi"), on his way to Kansas Territory, John Brown wrote the family to say all was well despite some delays caused by their freight in Chicago and a sick horse. Brown commented mostly on the nature of there journey to date and some miscellaneous business matters.


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