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Anna Freud correspondence

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[Page 1 Box 1 Folder 1]

 

Anna Freud

Wien, IX., Berggasse 19.

 

Dec. 30, 1936

 

Dear Dr. Menninger,

 

I just notice that a request of yours for reprint of my article “On the Theory of Analysis of Children” remained unanswered.  But I am sorry to say that I did not get any reprints from the Journal.  The article was afterwards included in the second edition of my small book on child-analysis.

 

With best regards,

 

Yours

 

Anna Freud

 

[Page 2 Box 1 Folder 1]

 

Anna Freud

 

Vienna, Dec. 31, 1936.

 

Dear Dr. Menninger,

 

This only brings you greetings for 1937.  I hope all goes well with you and your clinic.  I was glad to meet one of your co-workers at the Congress.

 

Sincerely yours,

 

Anna Freud

 

[Page 1 Box 1 Folder 2]

 

[in pencil] Please return to Kain

[in pen] Thank you [X.XX.]

 

24th February, 1948.

 

Dear Dr. Menninger,

 

It was very nice to hear from you again and I am grateful for your great patience with me.  That my visit to America has not come off yet, should not be a sign that my interest in whatever happens there in the field of analytic treatment, teaching, and research is not very great.

 

I have very good friends in Cleveland and I am in close touch with them.  In the near future one of their future co-workers will come to London to have his training analysis with me, and the same may happen about a second one.  But as you see, my co-operation with them is from the distance.  I am working very hard here and have no plans for leaving.

 

Will I see you in London in August 1948 for the Mental Health Congress, or next  year only for the International Psychoanalytic Congress which we hope will be arranged by then?

 

Yours sincerely,

 

Anna Freud

 

[Page 1 Box 1 Folder 3]

 

[Top of page]: [XXX] 3

[in pencil] Dr Frank

                  Kan[xxx]

 

24th November, 1948.

 

Dear Dr. Menninger,

 

I have just had a letter from Dr. Sarasin in Zurich telling me that the Congress date agreed to by the American Psychoanalytic Association is August 22nd 1949.  This is quite a change from what we had originally expected, but we are all very glad to have found a date which is convenient for the American friends so that the Congress can become a real reunion.  I do hope that it will be possible for you to come over, since in your last letter to me you indicate that this probably will be the case.  We are all looking forward to it.

 

You have surely had many news about the Mental Health Congress.  It was quite impressive as a big gathering of people from all countries and it was enjoyable that we at least snatched the opportunity for having small analytic gatherings on the side.  On the whole, I believe that this part of it, too, was quite successful.

 

I was most interested in your Institute programme and in the discussion of “Problems of Psychoanalytic Training” as discussed in the Bulletin of the American Psychoanalytic Association, volume 4, no. 3.  It is instructive to see how identical our training problems always are in spite of the fact that quantitatively they are always on a bigger scale in America.  My function in the Institute here in the last three years is mainly to give the course on “Principle of Psycho-Analysis” for the first year candidates, a course which goes through all the three terms on 24 evenings.  This gives me a good opportunity to judge the interests and theoretical abilities of incoming students.  While in some years the group of candidates is mostly intent on practical application to therapy, other groups show real psychological interest.  I find it easier now than some years ago to induce students to read.  Probably there are waves in this respect as there are in other things.

 

p.t.c.

 

[Page 2 Box 1 Folder 3]

 

I look forward to talks with you in Zurich.

 

Yours Sincerely,

 

Anna Freud

 

[Page 1 Box 1 Folder 4]

 

[A postcard, the front shows ruins of the Odeon of Herod Atticus in Athens, Greece.  Has text description in Greek and French.]

 

[Page 2 Box 1 Folder 4]

 

[Reverse of Postcard]

 

Athens, 31.12.48 [December 31, 1948]

 

My best New Year wishes from the very wonderful holiday in Greece.

 

Anna Freud

 

[Page 1 Box 1 Folder 5]

 

13th April, 1949.

 

Dear Mr. Ekstein,

 

May I ask you for a quick decision concerning the following proposal:-

 

I have in possession a paper on “Aggression” which I think, would suit your memorial number.  It is somewhat longer than the size you desire, but on American-sized paper I expect it would be 14 pages.  It is the lecture which I gave at the Mental Health Congress last summer.  I have asked the Congress Officials for their permission, and they have answered as follows:

 

“There is, of course, no objection to your having this paper published also in an American Scientific Journal, but, in this event, we would ask you to insert a footnote to the effect that this paper was delivered by you at a plenary session of the International Conference on Child Psychiatry, and is appearing in the Congress Proceedings to be distributed shortly.  The Proceedings of the Conference will be published by Messers. H.K. Lewis & Co., Ltd., 136 Gower Street, London, W.C.l, in Great Britain, and the Columbia University Press in the U.S.A.[”]

 

The symposium to which this paper was contributed had the title “Aggression in Relation to Emotional Development; Normal and Pathological”, a title which we would have to refer to in the footnote.  But I would suggest calling the paper as a contribution to your issue quite simply “Notes on Aggression”.  The paper was very carefully thought out and is, therefore, better than one I could write for you now at the spur of the moment.  To give you an idea of the content, I enclose a table of contents made up of the subheadings.

 

Please let me know your decision.  If possible send me a yes or no by cable so that I do not lose time in case you should not find this proposal acceptable.

 

Yours sincerely,

 

Anna Freud

 

ENCLOSURE.

 

[Page 1 Box 1 Folder 6]

 

20. Maresfield Gardens.

London. N.W.3.

 

25th April 1949.

 

Dear Mr. Ekstein,

 

After receiving your cable I am glad to send you my contribution for the Bulletin.

 

Yours very sincerely,

 

Anna Freud

 

Enclosure.

 

P.S. I have sent your letter to the Congress Authorities to make quite sure about the legal position and await their answer.  But I feel certain that it is all right.

 

A.F.

 

[Page 1 Box 1 Folder 7]

 

COPY

 

WOLRD FEDERATION FOR MENTAL HEALTH

19 Manchester Street

London, W.l.

 

28th April 1949.

 

Dear Miss Freud,

 

Thank you for your letter of 26th April.  I have read the letter from the American Editor of the Menninger Bulletin, and think you can set his mind at rest regarding the publication of your article.

 

The copyright of the Proceedings rests with the Congress, and the publishers are simply acting as our agents for distribution.

 

I return the Editor’s letter herewith.

 

Yours sincerely,

 

Signed: W.H. Duncan.

 

Miss Anna Freud,

20, Maresfield Gardens,

London, N.W.3.

 

[Page 2 Box 1 Folder 7]

 

20 Maresfield Gardens,

London, N.W.3.

 

4th May, 1949.

 

Dear Mr. Ekstein,

 

I had a very satisfactory answer from the Mental Health Congress Organizers concerning the copyright of my paper.  I enclose a copy of their letter.

 

Yours sincerely,

 

Anna Freud

 

Enclosure.

 

[Page 1 Box 1 Folder 8]

 

20 Maresfield Gardens,

London, N.W.3.

 

19.7.49 [July 19, 1949]

 

Dear Miss Lee,

 

I return the galley proof of my article with 5 printing errors, marked with red crosses.  Perhaps there is time still to correct them.

 

I enclose my order for 100 reprint copies.

 

Yours sincerely,

 

Anna Freud

 

[Page 1 Box 1 Folder 9]

 

20 Maresfield Gardens,

London, N.W.3.

 

9th February, 1950.

 

Dr. Karl Menninger,

The Menninger Foundation,

Topeka, Kansas.

 

Dear Dr. Menninger,

 

I have not forgotten my promise to come to Topeka, and I feel badly that I cannot redeem it this time.

 

The rumour about Clark University is true.  They sent me an invitation to take part in a symposium held in honour of their sixtieth anniversary and, rightly or wrongly, I felt tempted by it.  This immediately involved me in all sorts of difficulties, since their date just misses the easter holiday and is not as near to the American Convention as I would have wished.  Besides, I am naturally bound by working obligations here which permit no shifting.  So I am coming to America for a little more than a fortnight and I leave most of my wishes and plans unfulfilled.

 

My long planned visit in Topeka belongs to this unfulfilled part.  But if you do not feel too cross with me about it, I will make up for it on my next visit which, I suppose, will be easier to carry out and better planned than the present one.

 

I hope to see you for a day at least in Detroit.

 

Yours very sincerely,

 

Anna Freud

 

[Box 1 Page 1 Folder 10]

 

[In pencil]: Dorothy -

 

20 Maresfield Gardens,

London, N.W.3.

 

24th May, 1950.

 

Dr. Karl Menninger,

The Menninger Foundation,

Topeka, Kansas.

 

Dear Dr. Menninger,

 

Thank you so much for your letter which interested me very much.  I shall feel very honoured, indeed, to receive the draft of your chapter, and I shall be very glad to let you have my comments.  It is a subject which has never ceased to interest me and I am always happy to find that it has an equal fascination for others.  I look forward to the arrival of the copy.

 

I was very sorry not to see you in Detroit, but I quite agree that it is impossible to travel too much and do work, both at the same time.  I had a very good time in America and was greatly interested by all I saw and heard.  I was also very much spoilt by everybody.

 

I still feel very sorry that I had to break my promise to you, and I will make better arrangements definitely next time.

 

Yours very sincerely,

 

Anna Freud

 

[Page 1 Box 1 Folder 11]

 

20 Maresfield Gardens,

London, N.W.3.

 

5th October, 1950.

 

Dr. Karl Menninger,

The Menninger Foundation,

Topeka, Kansas.

 

Dear Dr. Menninger,

 

I should be very glad, indeed, to have your revised chapter of the forthcoming book.  I shall feel shy about sending you my comments, but will do so if you really want them.

 

I am glad to know that the Menninger Foundation still wants me to come.

 

Yours sincerely,

 

Anna Freud

 

[Page 1 Box 1 Folder 12]

 

London, 24th November 1951.

 

Dear Dr. Menninger,

 

I was very touched by the expression of your sympathy.  Thank you very much, and please thank the colleagues of your Institute and Society for me.

 

Yours sincerely

Anna Freud

 

[Page 2 Box 1 Folder 12]

 

[Envelope, Postmarked: Hampstead N.W.3.  25 Nov. 1951]

 

Dr. Carl Menninger

The Menninger Clinic

3617 West 6th Avenue

Topeka, Kansas

U.S.A.

 

[Page 1 Box 1 Folder 13]

 

[In pen]: Thank you

 

20 Maresfield Gardens,

London, N.W.3.

 

28th April, 1951.

 

Dr. Karl Menninger,

The Menninger Foundation,

Topeka, Kansas.

 

Dear Dr. Menninger,

 

I was delighted with your letter of the 13th of April and very glad, indeed, to hear that you were pleased with Hedy Schwarz’s activities and that you thought that the ideas which she put forward and the way in which she did it was clear, convincing and satisfying.  She does belong to a good team of workers here, and we are all trying to learn more while we teach, which is, I believe, a healthy way of appreciating one’s duties as a teacher.

 

You may have heard perhaps that recently the Field Foundation in New York has given me and our small group of workers here the necessary funds to build up a small clinic for child guidance and treatment.  We are still involved in the difficulties of finding a house, but when that is overcome I hope that we shall be able to do interesting work, and it would be very satisfactory, indeed if from time to time we could share our experiences with your clinic (compared to which in size we shall only be as large as a speck of dust).

 

I am most interested in the manuscript which you have sent me, and have jotted down notes on it but not yet in the form which I dare to send back.

 

This has been a bad winter here and I had to go on convalescence after a series of influenzas.  I have just returned and hope to be in better working order from now on.

 

Yours sincerely,

 

Anna Freud

 

[Page 1 Box 1 Folder 14]

 

20 Maresfield Gardens,

London, N.W.3.

Hampstead 2002.

 

19th September 1952.

 

Dear Dr. Menninger,

 

I write this letter with great regret since I know that you will be very cross with me when you receive it.  I have hesitated a long time, waiting for some shift in the plans which might make it possible for me to extend my visit to American and come to Topeka.  But the plans have remained unalterable and again I have to say that I cannot accept your invitation this time.

 

I go to Harvard for four weeks this time as a guest lecturer with a very busy program which does not allow for much outside activity.  You may wonder that I have chosen the academic world to work in, rather than the analytic world where lecturing might be more satisfying.  Perhaps it was not wise.  Anyway, it is a new experience for me and I want to do my best to carry it through properly.  I know that it would go beyond my strength to do both.

 

[Page 2 Box 1 Folder 14]

 

-2-

 

Please, forgive me once more.  If you do, I shall still consider that I have an obligation towards you which I will fulfill at a more favorable moment.

 

Yours sincerely

 

Anna Freud

 

[Page 1 Box 1 Folder 15]

 

[In pencil]: K A M

 

20 Maresfield Gardens,

London, N.W.3.

Hampstead 2002.

 

16th October 1953.

 

Dear Dr. Menninger,

 

I was very touched when I received your letter and, thinking about it, I felt that it was the nicest letter that anybody has ever written to me.  I shall think of your sentences whenever life seems specially strenuous or specially difficult, and they will help me.

 

I have tried to remember what my father said about Albert Schweiker, but there are no specific comments which I can remember.  There is only the general feeling of respect and admiration which he had for him and his work and his unselfishness.  He had a special expression on his face and a tone in his voice when he spoke of a man whom he thought admirable and I know that he had this feeling for Schweiker.

 

I am looking forward to the books.

Thank you so very much.

Yours sincerely

 

Anna Freud

 

[Page 1 Box 1 Folder 16]

 

As from:

20 Maresfield Gardens,

London, N.W.3.

Hampstead 2002.

 

9th August, 1956

 

Dr. Karl Menninger,

The Menninger Foundation,

Topeka, Kansas.

 

Dear Dr. Menninger,

 

I hope you do not think that I am a very heartless person with regard to Lee Yong Ho but, actually, I have nothing to do with the permissions for publication rights.  All I can do is to pass on such things to Imago Publishing Co. and to my brother, Ernst, who deals with the Sigmund Freud Copyrights.  I believe that they are very reluctant to give permission to unknown people abroad.  Is there anything that you know of Lee Yong Ho?  If so, I should like to tell my brother.

 

With best regards,

 

Yours sincerely,

 

Anna Freud

 

Enclosure.

 

[Page 1 Box 1 Folder 17]

 

20 Maresfield Gardens,

London, N.W.3.

Hampstead 2002.

 

14th October 1959.

 

Dear Dr. Menninger,

 

Thank you very much for sending me the pictures of my brother on his visit with you.  They are excellent and he looks so pleased and interested that it leaves no doubt that this was very enjoyable for him.  I hope that he also gave pleasure to his hosts!

 

We had a wonderful

 

[Page 2 Box 1 Folder 17]

 

summer here and it made up for the exertions of the Congress (which was very good in its level0.

 

With best regards,

yours sincerely

 

Anna Freud

 

[Page 1 Box 1 Folder 18]

 

20 Maresfield Gardens,

London, N.W.3.

Hampstead 2002.

 

31st October, 1960.

 

Dr. Bernard H. Hall,

Chairman,

Committee on Historical Library,

The Menninger Foundation,

Topeka, Kansas.

 

Dear Dr. Hall,

 

The four tape records of my New York lectures arrived safely this morning.  Thank you very much for sending them.  I only hope that having this copy made was not a great expense to your library.

 

I am very happy to know the original to be in your possession and I shall be glad to discuss any further use of it with you.

 

With my best regards,

 

Yours sincerely,

 

Anna Freud

 

[Page 2 Box 1 Folder 18]

 

[Airmail Envelope, postmarked Hampstead N.W.3. 1 Nov 1960]

 

Dr. Bernard H. Hall

Committee on Historical Library

 

THE MENNINGER FOUNDATION

 

Topeka, Kansas.

 

U.S.A.

 

[Page 1 Box 1 Folder 19]

 

Inter Office Memo

Date Sent August 14, 1961

To: Vesta Walker

From J. Tarlton Morrow, Jr., M.D./at

Subject: Bulletin of the Philadelphia Association for Psychoanalysis, June, 1961, Vol. II, pg. 80, “Special Scientific Meeting – Four Contributions to the Psychoanalytic Study of the Child,” by Anna Freud.

 

Dear Vesta:

 

Thank you for the summary of Miss Freud’s lectures in New York.  I am attaching my own summary of notes made there.  If you want to keep a copy in your library, you may.  If not, just send it back.  I was glad to know that the notes had been summarized; I didn’t know this before.

 

Although I know Miss Freud is slow about publishing some things (rightfully so), I wonder if you might write her asking if the lecture given in Philadelphia of 1954, entitled, “The Diagnosis and Assessment of Early Childhood Difficulties” is going to be published, expressing out interest in it.

 

If you feel this is unwise to do, I would understand.

 

[In handwriting]: Above Bull.[etin] returned and checked in. D.

 

[Page 2 Box 1 Folder 19]

 

August 25, 1961

 

Miss Anna Freud

20 Maresfield Gardens

London, N.W.3

 

Dear Miss Freud:

 

Dr. J. Tarlton Morrow, a member of our staff, has asked me to write to you concerning the possible publication of a lecture you gave in Philadelphia in 1954.  The paper was entitled “The Diagnosis and Assessment of Early Childhood Difficulties.”  Can you tell me if you are planning to publish this paper – if so when and where is it to be published?  Dr. Morrow and other staff members in our children’s division are interested in this subject and hope your paper will be published.  Any information you can give me would be most appreciated.

 

Sincerely,

 

THE MENNINGER CLINIC LIBRARY

 

By:

 

(Miss) Vesta Walker, Librarian

 

VEW/jr

[Page 3 Box 1 Folder 19]

 

[Airmail Envelope postmarked Southwold Suffolk 13 Sep 1961]

 

Miss Vesta Walker

Librarian

The Menninger Foundation

Topeka, Kansas

U.S.A.

 

[Page 4 Box 1 Folder 19]

 

20 Maresfield Gardens,

London, N.W.3.

Hampstead 2002.

 

13th September 1961.

 

Dear Miss Walker,

 

My paper on the “Diagnosis and Assessment of Early Childhood Difficulties” given in Philadelphia 1954, has never been published in this form.  But its contents will be included in a future book on the same subject on which I am working now.

 

Yours sincerely

 

Anna Freud

 

[Page 5 Box 1 Folder 19]

 

Dr. Morrow,

 

I think you will be interested in this correspondence.  Please return.

 

Thanks

 

Vesta

 

[In handwriting] Thank you very, very much.  Tarlton 9-19-61

 

[Page 1 Box 1 Folder 20]

 

20 Maresfield Gardens,

London, N.W.3.

Hampstead 2002.

 

14th December, 1961.

 

Dr. Karl Menninger,

The Menninger Foundation,

Topeka, Kansas.

 

Dear Dr. Menninger,

 

Thank you very much for you letter of November 14th and for your very friendly and generous invitation to me.  As you know, the plan of coming as a visitor to the Menninger Foundation has been in my mind for a long time, but I have to thank you for your extreme patience in waiting for its fulfillment. 

 

In this letter I wonly [sic] want to shat that I shall be glad to come and very glad to accept your offer of a Sloan Visiting Professorship.  My worry is only whether it is really all right for me to accept it for the short visit which I am able to make, and whether my commitments can be arranged in a way which will not overtax my strength.

 

As you suggest, I will write to Dr. Ramzy and Dr. Klemmer about all the details and I shall also ask them which period in the second half of September will be all right.  I have to be back in London for work on September 30th.

 

I look forward to meeting you again,

 

Yours sincerely,

 

Anna Freud

 

[Page 1 Box 1 Folder 21]

 

as from:

 

20 Maresfield Gardens,

London, N.W.3.

Hampstead 2002.

 

August 29, 1962.

 

Dear Dr. Murphy,

 

Thank you so much for your charming letters and offers of help and hospitality.  The visit to Topeka seems very near now and naturally I am a little frightened whether I can live up to all the various commitments.

 

The “[XXXXXXX] acres” look most tempting.  I do hope the schedule will leave me time to see them.  I gather there is a special weekend program on Child-Analysis.

 

Ramzy makes my program.  Could you possibly tell him that I should very much like to join your conference on Monday 11 a.m.?

 

I look forward to meeting you again and I do hope you are quite recovered from flu.  My bronchitis is all right again and I do feel adventurous after the summer rest.

 

Yours very sincerely

 

Anna Freud

 

[Page 1 Box 1 Folder 22]

 

20 Maresfield Gardens,

London, N.W.3.

Hampstead 2002.

 

September 30, 1962

 

Dear Dr. Karl,

 

I am home again and I want to thank you very much for everything that you have done for me: for visiting me, for being so nice to me, for the lovely rugs, and for the last encouraging telephone call.  But above all, I want to thank you for everything that you have done and are doing for psychoanalysis.  Although there are many analysts, I always feel that there are very few people who have really caught its spirit and realised its possibilities, -- and you have done both.  It was very exciting for me to see that, and I am full of respect. 

 

Please, give my love also to Mrs. Jean.

 

Yours very sincerely

 

Anna Freud

 

[Page 1 Box 1 Folder 23]

 

rec’d 10-29-62 ML

 

20 Maresfield Gardens,

London, N.W.3.

Hampstead 2002.

 

25th October, 1962.

 

Mrs. K. Menninger,

The Menninger Foundation,

Topeka, Kansas.

 

Dear Mrs. Menninger,

 

I enclose my paper on “Regression” which I gave as the C.F. Menninger Lecture in Topeka and which I promised for your Bulletin.  I had to make some alterations to it and that is why it took some time.

 

Please disregard the numbering of pages.  It begins with page III/38A, but this refers to the context in which the paper belongs.

 

Also the list of contents is not meant to be printed, but I thought  you might find it useful as a guidance for the arrangements of the headings and sub-headings.

 

And thank you once more very much for the lovely times which I had in your house.

 

Yours very sincerely,

 

Anna Freud

 

Enclosure.

 

P.S. Does the Bulletin provide for reprints?  May I ask you to let me know and what the conditions are?

A.F.

 

[Page 1 Box 1 Folder 24]

 

20 Maresfield Gardens,

London, N.W.3.

Hampstead 2002.

 

December 30, 1962.

 

Dear Dr. Karl,

 

It was the nicest present of all that your Indian rugs arrived just at Christmas time and, in their unspoiled beauty, were a surprise and a gift all over again.  After quite unnecessary bickering about trifles of red tape, the customs decided to release them suddenly, and made me very happy.  I have not quite decided yet whether to hang them up or have them on the floor; they look equally good both ways.

 

As you know, I want to send a small gift to your Museum and now I am in doubt about it.  I should have liked to send you a small MS [manuscript] of my father’s but the Archives have their hand on them and I am not free to take one away.  Now I wonder whether a

 

[Page 2 Box 1 Folder 24]

 

- 2 -

 

Photostat of one of the earliest ones would be acceptable to you, or whether that is not good enough.  Please, let me know and do not hesitate to say it if it is the wrong thing.  I shall then look further.

 

I have thought a great deal of you since I left, and only with pleasure.

 

My best wishes for the New Year to you and your wife and lovely daughter, and to the Menninger Foundation.

 

Yours sincerely

 

Anna Freud

 

[Page 1 Box 1 Folder 25]

 

20 Maresfield Gardens,

London, N.W.3.

Hampstead 2002.

 

24.2.63 [February 24, 1963]

 

Dear Mrs. Menninger,

 

Please, excuse me for being so late with my answer.  I was overwhelmed with urgent work recently and had to wait for this free weekend.

 

Now I am sending you my after-dinner talk, corrected.  Do use it, if you really want to.  I find it a little embarrassing to see something like that in print but I do not mind too much.  (I do hope you are publishing Dr. Karl’s speech on that occasion which gave such and impressive picture of the past.)

 

But I cannot say the same for my talk to the patients.  This is really too bitty and scrappy and should not be read.  Also too many pieces in it are taken from other papers.

 

[Page 2 Box 1 Folder 25]

 

- 2 -

 

I hope you do not mind too much but I just could not stand seeing it in print.

 

I do not mind about the pictures and I shall choose one to-morrow (I write from the country) and write extra so as not to delay this.  It is also all right to use some in the Quarterly.

 

I am delighted that you will be in London in July.  Please, let me know beforehand so that I can keep some free time.

 

We are still in snow and ice; and no riding here either!

 

Yours very sincerely

 

Anna Freud

 

[Page 1 Box 1 Folder 26]

 

20 Maresfield Gardens,

London, N.W.3.

Hampstead 2002.

 

26.2.63 [February 26, 1963]

 

Dear Mrs. Menninger,

 

There are a few photos which I should like you to discard.  They are No. 3, 4, 12, 14, 17, 18.  I make such awful faces on them.

 

All the others are very  nice and good to choose from.  I like P-7 specially.

 

Yours very sincerely

 

Anna Freud

 

[Page 1 Box 1 Folder 27]

 

20 Maresfield Gardens,

London, N.W.3.

Hampstead 2002.

 

March 23, 1963.

 

Dear Dr. Klemmer,

 

The tapes which you announced to me in December took a long time to arrive but they are safely here now and I keep them as a reminder of my very pleasant visit to Topeka.  Thank you very much indeed.

 

Please, give my best greetings to all my colleagues in the Menninger Clinic.

 

Yours sincerely

 

Anna Freud

 

[Page 1 Box 1 Folder 28]

 

[Letterhead]: THE HAMPSTEAD CHILD-THERAPY COURSE AND CLINIC

12 & 21, Maresfield Gardens, London, N.W.3.

 

Psychiatrist in Charge: Liselotte Frankl, M.B., B.S., PH.D.

 

Director: Anna Freud, LL.D.

20 Maresfield Gardens,

London, N.W.3.

Tel: Hampstead 2002

 

28th March, 1963.

 

Mrs. Jean Menninger,

The Menninger Foundation,

Topeka, Kansas.

 

Dear Mrs. Menninger,

 

Do not be surprised if you and your husband get a special letter of invitation from the staff of the Hampstead Clinic for July.  My co-workers are quite excited about your coming and hope to be able to show you a “Menninger Clinic in miniature” here in Hampstead.

 

Yours very sincerely,

 

Anna Freud

 

Anna Freud, LL.D.

 

[Page 1 Box 1 Folder 29]

 

Yale Law School, New Haven,

29.4.63 [April 29, 1963]

 

Dear Mrs. Lee,

 

Enclosed are the corrected galley-proofs.  I have checked as far as possible and I am adding remarks to each piece separately.  I return home to-morrow.  I am glad that I was able to do this from here still.

 

Yours sincerely

 

Anna Freud

 

[Page 1 Box 1 Folder 30]

 

20 Maresfield Gardens,

London, N.W.3.

Hampstead 2002.

 

May 8, 1963

 

Dear Mrs. Douglas Lee,

 

Following my last letter, I have obtained as a footnote to my Regression paper, at least part of the Gillespie reference:

 

W.H. Gillespie: “Some Regressive Phenomena in Old Age.”

 

This has been accepted for publication in the British Journal of Medical Psychology, but has not appeared yet.  I am writing to the editor to find out, if possible, for which number it is scheduled.

 

Yours sincerely

 

Anna Freud

 

[Page 1 Box 1 Folder 31]

 

20 Maresfield Gardens,

London, N.W.3.

Hampstead 2002.

 

13.5.63. [May 13, 1963]

 

Dear Mrs. Lee,

 

I enclose the reference for Dr. Gillespie’s paper.

 

Yours sincerely

 

Anna Freud

 

[Page 1 Box 1 Folder 32]

 

20 Maresfield Gardens,

London, N.W.3.

Hampstead 2002.

 

20th May 1963.

 

Mrs. Mary Douglas Lee,

Editor’s Assistant,

The Menninger Foundation,

Topeka, Kansas.

 

Dear Mrs. Lee,

 

Thank you for your letter of May 11th.  In the meantime you will have received my further information about Dr. Gillespie’s paper.

 

As regards to copies or reprints:-  Can I please have five extra copies of the whole number and, if at all possible, fifty reprints of my paper on “Regression”?  Since this is a paper written on the basis of Clinic material, I need the extra reprints for the Foundations that maintain us.  For the latter purpose, of course, I cannot use the whole number.

 

With best regards,

 

Yours sincerely,

 

Anna Freud

 

[In margin]: order 100 ch Sloon? Fdn?

 

[Page 1 Box 1 Folder 33]

 

[Christmas Card with an Asian image of two men in a forest]

 

[In handwriting]: Anna Freud

 

[Caption of image]: Enquiring the Way    Fu Pao-Shih

 

[Page 2 Box 1 Folder 33]

 

[Inner message of card: Greetings for Christmas and the New Year]

 

With many thanks for the beautiful book and my love for 1964, Anna Freud

 

[Page 3 Box 1 Folder 33]

 

[Image of stamp and postmark]

 

[Page 1 Box 1 Folder 34]

 

20 Maresfield Gardens,

London, N.W.3.

Hampstead 2002.

 

March 15, 1964.

 

Dear Dr. Karl,

 

I am also very pleased to appear together with you on April 13th and to meet Topeka friends again.  Mrs. Burlingham will be there also, probably.

 

I can only come from New Haven for the evening since I have seminars in Yale Monday afternoon and Tuesday morning, but I do hope we shall meet for supper before your lecture.  Afterwards I shall live to return.

 

With many greetings,

 

Yours sincerely

 

Anna Freud

 

[Page 2 Box 1 Folder 34]

 

[Lecture Programme, front]

 

THE PSYCHOANALYTIC RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT FUND

announces The First Annual

HERMAN NUNBER LECTURE

 

April 13, 1964

8:30 P.M.

 

New York Academy of Medicine

2 East 103rd Street, New York City

 

[Page 3 Box 1 Folder 34]

 

[Lecture Programme, inside]

 

The Herman Nunberg Lecture has been established by the Psychoanalytic Research and Development Fund to mark the distinguished contribution which Dr. Nunberg has made to psychoanalysis.

 

It is the aim of the Psychoanalytic Research and Development Fund to promote research, teaching, and application of psychoanalysis in the great tradition established by Freud and carried on by Nunberg.

 

Lectures, to be chosen annually by the Professional Board of the Fund, will deal with basic topics in the theory and practice of psychoanalysis within this tradition.

 

[Page 4 Box 1 Folder 34]

 

[Program, continued]

 

Program

 

Greetings

            Peter B. Neubauer, M.D.

 

Introduction to the Herman Nunberg Lectureship: An Appreciation

            Anna Freud, LL.D.

 

The Herman Nunberg Lecture

            Karl Menninger, M.D.

            “The Greater Evil”

 

[Page 5 Box 1 Folder 34]

 

[Program, continued]

 

The Psychoanalytic Research and Development Fund, Inc. was established in 1956 as an independent, non-profit organization.  Its purposes include the initiation and carrying out of psychoanalytic research, the accumulation and dissemination of data, and of responsible opinion and the generation of interest in, and support for these activities.

 

HERMAN NUNBERG, M.D.

Chairman, Board of Directors

 

PETER B. NEUBAUER, M.D.

President

 

ALLAN D. EMIL

MORTIMER OSTOW, M.D.

Vice-Presidents

 

MORTIMER OSTOW, M.D.

Secretary

 

IRA A. SCHUR

Treasurer

 

SIDNEY S. FURST, M.D.

Professional Director

ROBERT C. BAK, M.D.

ALLAN D. EMIL

SIDNEY KAHR, M.D.

MARY B. LASKER

PETER B. NEUBAUER, M.D.

HERMAN NUNBERG, M.D.

MORTIMER OSTOW, M.D.

WILLIAM ROSENWALD

IRA A. SCHUR

RENE SPITZ, M.D.

ROBERT WAELDER, Ph.D.

JOSEPH S. WOHL

ALVIN R. YOUNG

 

4670 WALDO AVENUE, NEW YORK 71, N.Y.

 

[Page 6 Box 1 Folder 34]

 

[Airmail Envelope, postmarked Hampstead N.W.3. 18 MCH 1964]

 

Dr. Karl Menninger

The Menninger Foundation

Topeka, Kansas

U.S.A.

 

[Page 7 Box 1 Folder 34]

 

[Reverse of Airmail Envelope with return address]

 

From Anna Freud

20 Maresfield Gardens,

London, N.W.3.

Hampstead 2002.

ENGLAND

 

[Page 1 Box 1 Folder 35]

 

20 Maresfield Gardens,

London, N.W.3.

Hampstead 2002.

 

July 11, 1965.

 

Dear Dr. Menninger,

 

I am terribly sorry to miss your daughter when she comes to London.  But August is holiday time here, the clinic will be closed and I shall be away until late September.  Please, tell her how much I regret it.

 

Shall I see you in Amsterdam?

 

Yours sincerely

 

Anna Freud

 

[Page 2 Box 1 Folder 35]

 

[Airmail Envelope, postmarked Hampstead N.W.3. 13 JLY 1965]

 

Dr. Karl Menninger

The Menninger Foundation

Topeka, Kansas

U.S.A.

 

[Page 1 Box 1 Folder 36]

 

20 Maresfield Gardens,

London, N.W.3.

Hampstead 2002.

 

March 26, 1966.

 

Dear Dr. Karl,

 

Thank you for your charming letter.  I would love to try a ride with you and for Rosemary (if the horse promised to bear with me.)  It is difficult to decide about the second, or third, without knowing whether the first one is all right.  In any case, I shall bring my riding trousers.

 

And I shall love having supper at your house, family style.

 

Very sincerely yours

 

Anna Freud

 

[Page 1 Box 1 Folder 37]

 

Rathmore [XX], Baltimore, County Cork, Eire.

 

April 21, 1966.

 

Dear Dr. Karl,

After return from America, I am having a wonderful holiday here in the rocky wilds of Ireland.  I suppose it must be something like your trips to the Reservations, -- only the Red Indians missing.  But there is the same freedom of the daily worries and problems and of the human contacts and difficulties.

 

I want to thank you once more for everything this last visit to the Menninger Foundation has offered me.  I enjoyed it from beginning to end.  The only worry was that I mind deeply to see you unhappy and conflicted.  You have done more for analysis in the U.S. than almost anybody else and we all owe you an enormous debt.  People forget that over the day to day concerns but they should not and I hope that you yourself will find the right solution.  Do not ever leave the Menninger Foundation.  It could never be the same without your vision.

 

With love,

 

Yours

 

Anna Freud

 

[Page 1 Box 1 Folder 38]

 

as from:

 

20 Maresfield Gardens,

London, N.W.3.

Hampstead 2002.

 

April 21, 1966.

 

Dear Dr. Hill,

 

I want to thank you and your wife once more for the lovely lunch in your house with your charming family.  I enjoyed it very much, as I enjoyed my whole stay in the Menninger Foundation.

 

As I have been before, I was deeply impressed again by all the work which goes on in all the departments of the foundation and of the atmosphere and enthusiasm which are created one can only say there should be more places like this all over the world.

 

I send you my best wishes for your health.  I can imagine what a hard struggle for it lies behind you.

 

Yours very sincerely

 

Anna Freud

 

[Page 1 Box 1 Folder 39]

as from:

 

20 Maresfield Gardens,

London, N.W.3.

Hampstead 2002.

 

April 25, 1966.

 

Dear Dr. Klemmer,

 

Now that I have returned to Europe, I want to thank you once more for all your friendliness to me, and for giving me a part in the 20th Anniversary Reunion.  I think this Reunion was a wonderful occasion and I was struck by the way in which it showed the deep impression made by the years at Menninger’s on the various members.  There should be more Schools of Psychiatry able to create that spirit!

 

It was a pleasure for me to participate in it.

 

With best regards,

 

yours sincerely

 

Anna Freud

 

[Page 1 Box 1 Folder 40]

 

as from:

 

20 Maresfield Gardens,

London, N.W.3.

Hampstead 2002.

 

April 25, 1966.

 

Dear Mr. North,

 

Now that I have returned to Europe, may I thank you once more for all the trouble which my visit to the Menninger Foundation must have created for you.  I am also especially grateful for the efforts which you expended for the arrangements of the meetings of the American Association for Child Psychoanalysis.  It was my suggestion that the Association might meet in Topeka.  But I did not think at the time of all the work which would be involved in making it such a success.

 

Yours very sincerely

 

Anna Freud

 

[Page 2 Box 1 Folder 40]

 

[Airmail Envelope from Ireland dated 25 IV 66]

 

Mr. Emlin North

The Menninger Foundation

Box 829

Topeka, Kansas 66601

U.S.A.

 

[Page 1 Box 1 Folder 41]

 

as from:

 

20 Maresfield Gardens,

London, N.W.3.

Hampstead 2002.

 

April 30, 1966.

 

Dear Mr. North,

 

Thank you very much for sending me the transcription of my address so promptly.  It is a great help to have it.

 

Yours sincerely

 

Anna Freud

 

[Page 2 Box 1 Folder 41]

 

[Airmail Envelope]

 

Mr. Emlin E. North, Jr.

The Menninger Foundation

Topeka, Kansas 66601

U.S.A.

 

[Page 3 Box 1 Folder 41]

 

[Reverse of Envelope]

 

[Postmarked Birmingham, Ala. 3 May 1966]

 

[Page 1 Box 1 Folder 42]

 

20 Maresfield Gardens,

London, N.W.3.

Hampstead 2002.

 

May 7, 1966.

 

Dear Mr. North,

 

Thank you for sending me the transcript of my remarks to the American Assoc. for Child Psychoanalysis.  I was very glad to receive it, and the blank spaces do not detract at all from its usefulness.

 

Yours sincerely

 

Anna Freud

 

[Page 2 Box 1 Folder 42]

 

[Airmail Envelope postmarked Hamptstead N.W.3. 9 May 1966]

 

Mr. Emlin E. North, Jr.

The Menninger Foundation

Topeka, Kansas 66601

U.S.A.

 

[Page 1 Box 1 Folder 43]

 

20 Maresfield Gardens,

London, N.W.3.

Hampstead 2002.

 

25th May. 1966.

 

Dr. Karl Menninger,

The Menninger Foundation,

Topeka, Kansas 66601.

 

Dear Dr. Karl,

 

Thank you for your letter of May 10th.  When you arrive in London on July 30th, I shall have just begun my holiday in Walberswick, Suffolk, where I go on July 29th.  Do you think that you could possibly visit there with your wife during your stay in London?  You will be very welcome.

 

Yours sincerely,

 

Anna Freud

 

Anna Frued, LL.D., Sc.D.

 

[Page 1 Box 1 Folder 44]

 

Rathmore w. Baltimore,

County Cork, Eire.

 

September 15, 1966.

 

Dear Dr. Karl,

 

It seems a long way from England to here and the news of your brother’s death has reached me only yesterday.

 

I am thinking a great deal of you and what a difficult time this must be for you.  I know from my own experience what siblings mean in one’s life, quite apart from recent good or bad relations with them.  They share one’s past and one’s childhood as no one else can do and a bit of that dies with them.  I am very, very sorry.

 

I missed not seeing you in August.

 

Yours Sincerely,

 

Anna Freud

 

[In pencil beneath signature]

 

20 Maresfield Gardens

London N.W.3

England

 

[Page 1 Box 1 Folder 45]

 

[A card with a photo of Miss Freud on the cover, below inscribed:]

 

27.12.67 [December 27, 1967]

 

Dear Dr. and Mrs. Karl,

 

[Page 2 Box 1 Folder 45]

 

[Reverse of card]

 

Thank you so much for giving me the Bulletin again!

 

I send you both my very best wishes and love,

 

yours

 

Anna Freud

 

[Page 1 Box 1 Folder 46]

 

20 Maresfield Gardens,

London, N.W.3.

01-435 2002.

 

February 10, 1969.

 

Dear Dr. and Mrs. Menninger,

 

Thank you so much for giving me the Bulletin of the Menninger Clinic again for 1969.  It is always a pleasure to receive it, and I enjoy the publications as much as my colleagues in the Clinic do.

 

I hope that all is well with you.  I have a sad family loss quite recently.  My brother Oliver died rather suddenly after an operation in Williamstown.  I believe that you have known both him and his wife, now his widow.

 

With best regards,

 

yours sincerely

 

Anna Freud

 

[Page 1 Box 1 Folder 47]

 

[In ink at top of page]: “Special letters”

 

20 Maresfield Gardens,

London, N.W.3.

Hampstead 2002.

 

November 30, 1969.

 

Dear Dr. Karl Menninger,

 

Thank you very much for the nice pictures.  It is a good to remember your visit, and I do hope that you will repeat it soon.

 

With best regards to you and your wife,

 

yours sincerely,

 

Anna.

 

[Page 1 Box 1 Folder 48]

 

[Card with photo, inscribed beneath]:

 

Ireland 1969.

 

[Page 2 Box 1 Folder 48]

 

[Reverse of Card]

 

With my best thoughts for the “annual gift” of the Bulletin and good wishes for 1970, and my love,

 

Anna Freud

 

[Page 1 Box 1 Folder 49]

 

[At top, in pencil]: Freud, Anna

 

20 Maresfield Gardens,

London, N.W.3.

01-435 2002.

 

17th December, 1971.

 

Dear Dr. Karl and Mrs. Jean,

 

Thank you so much for your Christmas Greetings.  I can only say that a Christmas present is always welcome, and all the more when it will come separated from the rush time of the holidays.  It will be very welcome.

 

With my best regards and good wishes,

 

Yours sincerely,

 

Anna Freud

 

Dr. K. and Mrs. J. Menninger,

The Menninger Foundation, Box 829,

Topeka, Kansas 66601.

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