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This is a portrait of Catherine (Kate) German, who was taken captive with her sisters, Sophia, Julia, and Adelaide, by Cheyenne Indians after their family was killed. On September 11, 1874, the John German family, consisting of his wife and seven children, was attacked by a band of Cheyenne east of Ft. Wallace, Kansas. Only the four youngest, Sophia, Catherine, Julia, and Adelaide, were spared and taken captive. The two youngest, Julia and Adelaide (aged 7 and 5), were subsequently abandoned on the prairie in what is now the Texas panhandle. Sophia and Catherine were kept by their Cheyenne captors. Fort Wallace received word of the killings and began the search to find the girls and to negotiate their release. They found Julia and Adelaide, who had survived on their own for 6 weeks, and on February 26, 1875, the Cheyennes released Catherine and Sophia. The two girls were reunited with their younger sisters at Ft. Leavenworth, Kansas.

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Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening

Posted by Jocelyn Wehr (Digital Archivist) on Jan 8, 2014

You never know what you will find in a collection of records. The Menninger Archives has a group of records called the Historic Psychiatry collection.  Within that group of records are three letters that relate to Dr. Karl Menninger receiving an autographed copy of Robert Frost’s poem "Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening," originally written in 1922.  In a note written September 1, 1959, Dr. Karl explained how he came by the autographed copy of the poem.  He had shared a room with Dr. Merrill Moore at the American Psychiatric Association meeting in May 1940.  Dr. Moore was a well-known psychiatrist but also a poet.  Dr. Karl and Dr. Moore were sharing a room because the hotel was full.  Moore recited the Frost poem and Dr. Karl wrote that he “was entranced.”  Apparently, Dr. Karl wrote Dr. Moore after the conference.  On June 6, 1940, after sharing niceties, Dr. Moore responded that “Oddly enough the day your letter came Robert Frost was in my office consulting me so as he left I asked him to sign this poem for you.  Needless to say, he was delighted to do it.”  Enclosed with the letter was a typewritten copy of the poem with Robert Frost’s autograph.  He also wrote:  “To Dr. Karl Menninger of Topeka Kansas through the thoughtfulness of Dr. Merrill Moore of Boston, 1940."

 

[Post written by Pat Michaelis (Research Collections Division Director)]  


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